Privately owned axe from Kaliningrad

At the end of July 2019 I was contacted by a Danish collector who wanted to consult a few pieces of early medieval axes before a purchase. He bought the axe described below from a private collector in Germany on my recommendation, because in my opinion there was the lowest chance of a forgery. If it was indeed a forgery, it would be extraordinarily well manufactured and its making cost would probably exceed the auction price. In August of the same year the axe has been lent to me for documentation, for which I sincerely thank the owner!

 

A brief description of the artifact

In our hands there is an exceptionally well preserved axe head which can be assigned to Petersen’s type M (Petersen 1919: 46-47), more specifically to its M1 subtype (Atgāzis 1997: 56), most precisely to Kotowicz’s type IIIA.5.3 (Kotowicz 2018: 85-87); it is therefore a wide axe head with the shaft part furnished by thorns on both sides and having a flat butt from the overhead view and straight from a side view and a blade that is not shaped into a beard. It is a very famous and historically popular type of battle axe, during the period of 10th to 14th century spread from Ireland to Russia. As reported by the collector, the artifact comes from a private collection in Munich, to which it got after being randomly found in Kaliningrad during the 1980’s. According to knowledge of its origin and analogies the axe can be dated to the 11th or 12th century (Atgāzis 1997: 56). In the Baltic area it is a popular militaria known from Latvia (250 examples, Atgāzis 1997: 53), Estonia (at least 18 examples, Atgāzis 1997: 1. att), Lithuania (at least 13 examples, Atgāzis 1997: 1. att) and the Kaliningrad region (at least 8 examples, Kazakevičius 1996: 234).

The object appears compact, only the thorn tips are fragile and there is a risk of their breaking. The surface, including the top as well as the bottom side, is furrowed by corroded dents. Blade’s surface and the inner part shaft hole are showing marks of rust. At a few spots of the shaft hole there are probable imprints of wood which had long fibers, seemingly coming from a broad-leaved tree. It is at least noticeable that the axe was thoroughly cleaned on its face sides and it might have been treated with a lacquer. It is not possible to estimate an exact process of manufacturing by plain observation, however it is probable that the weapon was made from a more malleable iron ingot with a steel plate welded on its front part, where the edge was then formed. That is evident from a characteristic raised profile of the blade as well as from the corroded cutting edge. The process of creating the shaft hole is disputable – it might have been made either by splitting, puncture or bending (Kotowicz 2018: 25-27). My personal opinion, which is based on poorly visible layers on the upper and lower side of the neck, the asymmetrical thickness of the shaft hole’s walls and a the blade’s slight inclination to jut out of the axis between the middle of the butt and the edge, is that the loop was made by bending, therefore the Kotowicz’s variant no. 5 (Kotowicz 2018: 27).

The axe head currently weights 333 (332.84) g. The length from the center of the butt to the center of the blade is 160 mm (from the center of the butt to the upper tip of the blade it is 173 mm; from the center of the butt to the lower tip of the blade it is 160 mm), the blade width is 175 mm and edge length is 181 mm. Minimum height of the neck is 23 mm, the collar thickness is 16.5 mm on the edge of the shaft hole. Maximum thickness of the axe at the shaft hole level is 28 mm, from where it is going down to 25.5 mm at the butt. The height of the shaft hole including the thorns is 39-41 mm. The butt height is 20.5 mm. The shaft hole, roughly tear-shaped, is approximately 25.7 × 21 mm; on the inner side there is a noticeable wood imprint. The less dominant upper thorns narrow down to the thickness of about 2.5 mm, while the more distinctive lower thorns probably narrowed down to sharp spikes and now there are rounded tips with 1.5-2 mm thickness. Thickness at the thinnest point of the blade is 2.6 mm, however the thickness of less than 3 mm is stable on solid 45 mm of the blade total length of 138 mm (from the shaft hole edge to the upper tip). Width of the welded edge is approximately 17-31 mm (shortest at the middle of the blade, longest at the tips) with a 7.5 mm maximum thickness, which steadily declines to the flat-honed edge being less than 1 mm thick even in the present day.

The connection to the M1 subtype is assumed by the analogies from the Baltic assemblage: the M1 subtype has a neck width of 20-25 mm, butt width of 20-25 mm and butt thickness up to 7 mm, as distinct from the M2 (25-35 mm neck width) and M3 (35-50 mm neck width) subtypes (Atgāzis 1997: 56). However, an raised profile of the welded edge is more typical for M2 subtype axes, possibly suggesting broader dating. With its parameters this axe fits well among its Baltic counterparts. Baltic axes are 125–235 mm long and 120–225 mm wide (Kazakevičius 1996: 233), while Polish axes are 136–210 mm long and 110-206 mm wide (Kotowicz 2014) and Russian ones are 170-220 mm long and 130-200 mm wide (Kirpičnikov 1966: 39). Speaking of its weight of 333 grams, it is not in accord with the axe’s original form, where it might have been heavier even by one third. Baltic axes rarely weigh more than 500-600 g and tend to be lighter, roughly about 400 g (Atgāzis 1997: 55). Similarly it is for Russian (200–450 g; Kirpičnikov 1966: 39) or Polish axes (100–450 g; Kotowicz 2014). With the shaft having to be very thin and therefore lightweight due to small dimensions of the shaft hole the whole weapon’s weight was definitely less than 1 kg. The shaft could probably be about 80-120 cm long with the axe being put on from above instead of from below (as it is usual for this type of axes), therefore the shaft was slightly wider just below the axe head. It is a masterfully constructed weapon, where the material is spread perfectly and efficiently so it has not a gram to waste and the quality material on the edge is held by the rest being of lower quality. Especially in this construction we can see the reason why this weapon remained in use throughout four centuries. The weight and size of the weapon allows ideas it was a multifunctional weapon serviceable by one or both hands as needed.


Baltic analogies from Palanga, Vilkumuiža, Pasilciems.
Source: Kazakevičius 1996: Rys. 1.


X-ray images and their evaluation

At the beginning of this year this axe has been introduced to Ing. Jiří Hošek Ph.D. from the Archeological Institute of AV ČR, which is a leading Czech authority in the field of medieval metallurgy. As a part of our meeting we conducted a cursory investigation as well as X-ray imaging. Mr. Hošek agrees with the description and does not consider it a forgery. In his words it complies with the parameters of medieval axes.

The X-ray images were taken by the Comet MXR-225HP/11 device. We focused on the shaft hole area and the edge, as we expected finding marks that suggest welding. However, the only weld mark was found in the shaft hole area, which confirms the assumption that the loop was created by bending and not by puncture. There are no marks of this weld on the side and none appear on the edge either. Mr. Hošek assumes that the edge was definitely welded. There might be several reasons for the welds not being visible – as Mr. Hošek remarks, the X-ray is unable to detect the welds themselves, only the lines of admixture enabling the radiation to permeate more easily. The fact that these lines are not visible in case of this axe might be caused by the combination of quality craftsmanship, good preservation and the geometry of the weld not being executed in a single line. He adds that if computed tomography or invasive methods were used, the result might have been more apparent.

Aside from the weld in the loop area we noticed two more curiosities – in the upper part of the blade there was a crack extending from a dimple on the upper edge, probably created by a hard blow. The second curiosity is the fact that the lower tip tends to bend in spiral when compared to the axis between the middle of the butt and the upper tip. Also it seems that the shaft hole is slightly conical when viewed from the side.

Thanks to Ing. Jiří Hošek Ph.D. for his kind reception and scholarly counsel.


Here we will finish this article. Thank you for your time and we look forward to any feedback. If you want to learn more and support my work, please, fund my project on Patreon or Paypal.


Bibliography

Atgāzis 1997 = Atgāzis, Māris (1997). Āvas cirvji Latvijā // Archeologija un etnogrāfija XIX. Riga: 53-63.

Atgāzis 1998 = Atgāzis, Māris (1998). Tuvcīņas ieroči senajā Latvijā 10.-13.gadsimtā. Doktorská práce, Latvijas Universitāte.

Kazakevičius 1996 = Kazakevičius, Vytautas (1996). Topory bojowe typu M. Chronologia i pochodzenia na źiemiach Bałtów. In: Słowiańszczyzna w Europie średniowiecznej, Wrocław: 233–241.

Kirpičnikov 1966 Кирпичников А. Н. (1966). Древнерусское оружие. Вып. 2: Копья, сулицы, боевые топоры, булавы, кистени IX – XIII вв, Москва.

Kotowicz 2014 = Kotowicz, Piotr N. (2014). Topory wczesnośredniowieczne z ziem polskich : Katalog źródeł, Rzeszów.

Kotowicz 2018 = Kotowicz, Piotr N. (2018). Early Medieval Axes from Territory of Poland, Kraków.

Petersen 1919 = Petersen, Jan (1919). De Norske Vikingesverd: En Typologisk-Kronologisk Studie Over Vikingetidens Vaaben. Kristiania.

Axes with perforated blades

valgard_sekera

Reconstruction of a cross axe. Author: Jakub Zbránek.

In the vortex of battle, we often encounter axes that have an atypical appearance – the center of the blade is cut and in some cases filled with a cross-like or hammer-like protrusion. This popular shape of axes has repeatedly provoked debates about authenticity, so we decided to gather known information into one summary article, the value of which may prove in the future with increasing material.

We will not include axes with one round hole in this article. Single round perforation is a common feature of 10th-13th century Central and Eastern European axes and its meaning can be reduced to two interpretations – the suspension hole for a sheath and decoration originally filled with a contrast metal (Kotowicz 2018: 35-6; Vlasatý 2015Vlasatý 2020b).


Catalogue

The catalog collects a total of 15 European Early Medieval axes, which have more significantly perforated blades. Typologically, they belong to axes of Petersen types L / M, double axes, hammer axes and T-shaped axes.

  • Ludvigshave, Denmark
    A cross axe of L/M type found in a mound discovered at the end of the 19th century. In the literature, the place is also known as Pederstrup. Axe length 21.9 cm, axe width 18 cm. At present, the axe is stored in the Danish National Museum with inventory number C9115.
    Literature: Brøndsted 1936: 181182, fig. 92:2; Paulsen 1956: 67, fig. 25:c; Pedersen 2014: 31, 74, Find list 2; Roesdahl – Wilson 2000: 279, no. 194.

The axe from Ludvigshave. Source: Natmus.dk.

  • Sortehøj, Denmark
    A cross axe of L/M type found in a mound discovered in 1831. In the literature, the place is also known as Gjersing. Axe length 18 cm, axe width 17.5 cm. At present, the axe is stored in the Danish National Museum with inventory number NM2866.
    Literature: Brøndsted 1936: 121, fig. 63; Pedersen 2014: Find list 2.

The axe from Sortehøj. Source: Natmus.dk.

  • Unknown place, central Jutland, Denmark 
    A cross axe of L/M type found in an unknown context Axe length 23 cm, axe width 22 cm. The neck and the butt are inlayed with copper alloy strips. At present, the axe is stored in the Silkeborg Museum.
    Literature: Schiørring 1978.

The axe from Silkeborg Museum. Source: Silkeborg Museum.

  • Närke, Sweden
    A cross axe of L/M type found in a damaged grave. Axe length 17.5 cm, axe width 16 cm. At present, the axe is stored in the State Historical Museum in Stockholm with catalog number SHM 10243.
    Literature: Hansson 1983: 7, 27; Paulsen 1956: 67, fig. 25:b.


The axe from Närke. Source: ATA, Riksantikvarieämbetet Stockholm.

  • Stentugu, Hejde, Gotland, Sweden
    A cross axe of L/M type, found as a stray find in 1931. Axe length 15.5 cm, axe width 14 cm. At present, the axe is stored in Visby Museum with catalog number GF C 7642.
    Literature: Thunmark-Nylén 1998: Taf. 260:5; 2000: 376; 2006: 312.

The axe from Stentugu. Source: Thunmark-Nylén 1998: Taf. 260:5.

  • Unknown place, vicinity of Płock, Poland
    A cross axe of Kotowicz type IIIA.5.1, probably originating from a damaged grave. The blade of the axe is equipped with a small cross-shaped perforation. Axe length 17 cm, axe width 15.9 cm. At present, the axe is stored in Płock Museum with catalog number VD/128.
    LiteratureKotowicz 2013: 51, Fig. 11; Kotowicz 2014: 201-2, Tabl. CLIV.1.


The axe from Płocku. Source: Kotowicz 2013: Fig. 11.

  • Unknown place, northeastern Bulgaria
    One of the double axes of Jotov type 4B from northeastern Bulgaria is equipped with four holes arranged in a cross. No further information is known.
    Literature
    : Jotov 2004: кат. No 582, обр. 51, табло L.


The axe from northeastern Bulgaria. Source: Jotov 2004: кат. No 582, обр. 51, табло L.

  • Unknown place, Russia
    The Krasnodar Museum in Russia houses an Early Medieval double axe, the blade of which is perforated. The axe has small dimensions. No further information is known.
    Literature
    : Vlasatý 2020a.

The axe from Krasnodar Museum.
Source: Краснодарский государственный историко-археологический музей-заповедник им. Е.Д.Фелицына.

  • Bilär, Russia
    A double axe with a perforated blade was found in the center of Volga Bulgaria. No further information is known.
    Literature
    : Izmailov 1997: 77-80, рис. 45.1.

The axe from Bilär. Source: Izmailov 1997: 77-80, рис. 45.1.

  • Moldovanovka, Russia
    A double axe with a perforated blade measuring 19.5 × 3.8 cm.
    Literature
    : Kočkarov 2006: 20, 22, Прил. 1, Табл. II.

The axe from Moldovanovka. Source: Kočkarov 2006: Табл. II.

  • Demenki, Russia
    A double axe with a perforated blade measuring 18.1 × 3.6 cm, found in grave no. 18 in Demenki, Perm, in 1953.
    Literature
    : Danič 2015: 112, 117, рис. 11. 57.

The axe from Demenki. Source: Danič 2015: рис. 11.57.

  • Unknown place, southern Ukraine
    A double axe with a perforated blade was found during illegal detector activity in 2015 and sold to a private collector. The axe was allegedly found in the grave along with another military, while the attached helmet was a fake.
    Literature
    : unpublished.

The axe that was illegally digged in southern Ukraine.

  • Unknown place, Sweden
    A hammer axe of Kotowicz type IA.6.33 with perforations that forms palmette-shape decoration. The dimensions of the axe are about 10-11 cm × 4.5-5.5 cm. The current state of the find is unknown, the last place of storage was the Falköping Museum.
    Literature
    : Paulsen 1956: 40, 64, Abb. 25d; Vlasatý 2020a.

The axe from Falköping Museum. Source: Paulsen 1956: Abb. 25d; Vlasatý 2020a.

  • Mikulčice, Czech Republic
    The 1994 grave hid a remarkable T-shaped axe (ref. No. 341/90), which had a triangular hole in the blade and a twisted neck. The axe burned down during a fire in the Mikulčice deposit in 2007.
    Literature
    Luňák 2010: 50, Obr. 22.

Sekera z Mikulčic. Source: Luňák 2010: Obr. 22.

  • Borovan, Bulgaria
    One of the Jotov type 5A axes from the Borovan locality is equipped with a rectangular hole. No further information is known.
    Literature
    Jotov 2004: кат. No 584, табло L.

The axe from Borovan. Source: Jotov 2004: кат. No 584, табло L.


Cross axes

A cross axe (Danish korsøkse) is a designation for a small group of Petersen axes of the L/M type, whose blades are perforated to form a cross. The types can be generally dated to approximately 950–1050 (Petersen 1919: 46–47), while cross axes were dated more accurately to the second half of the 10th century (Paulsen 1956: 67). So far, six pieces of these axes are known – three come from Denmark, two from Sweden and one from Poland. The distribution is therefore spread in the Baltic region. In terms of the frequency of these axes, they represent a marginal topic in the corpus of Scandinavian weapons, and even within the L/M types they cannot make up more than 1% of the total. It would be difficult to find a more eloquent statistic than Kotowicz’s analysis, which shows that only 0.45% of all Polish axes from the period 6th – 1st half of the 13th century were somehow decorated with a cross (Kotowicz 2013: 41).

The scientific literature pays surprisingly little attention to these axes. This is partly due to the fact that the finds are of an older date, which limits the possibilities of interpretation. Therefore, it is appropriate to list the literature that concerns this phenomenon. The website of the Danish National Museum reads:

Research indicates that such axes were robust enough for practical use. However, it is more likely that they were reserved for ceremonial purposes. The owners of these cross axes were not necessarily Christian, but the axes reflect the strong Christian currents that existed in this part of the Viking period.

danax

In the book “From Viking to Crusader: Scandinavia and Europe 800-1200” (Roesdahl – Wilson 2000: 279, no. 194) we find the same information and learn that axes “could have been used for ceremonial purposes, as were axes inlaid with silver and gold [eg axes from Mamten or Trelleborg].” We also read that such “perforated axes are unusual in Scandinavian times in Viking Period.” Finally, the book informs us that “during Christian missions, weapons were rarely buried in graves, but even at the end of the 10th century, the ax could have been a symbol of the warrior class.”

In her study “Materiel kultur, identitet og kommunikation” (Pedersen 2008: 15–16), Anne Pedersen considers that “the practical function of cross axes has been subordinated to symbolic significance“, and also deals with their distribution:

Due to the relatively uniform shape of the axes and their geographical distribution, it can be argued that they were a symbol that was used and understood in a broader context in a large area of Scandinavia. We can also assume that the few men who owned such an axe were part of a closer community, and the axe was thus a symbol of loyalty that was not limited to local space.

Hunnestad

Reconstructed scene of the runestone DR 282. Possible appearance of a Varangian. Taken from Ewing 2006: 112.

This is in line with Piotr Kotowicz’s study “The Sign of the Cross on the Early Medieval Axes – A Symbol of Power, Magic or Religion?“. He puts perforated axes into the broader context of axes decorated with crosses and shows that this is a northern European phenomenon of 6th to mid-13th century and that there was more frequent storage of axes with the dead after the Christianization of Scandinavia, which is also reflected by perforated axes (Kotowicz 2013: 42). Kotowicz understand cross axes as strictly Viking phenomenon. However, he does not state that the deposit of axes ended up in Scandinavia during the 11th century. This increase of axes in graves is truly remarkable and, according to Kotowicz, is related to the fact that the axe has become a symbol of the warrior profession, which can be compared to the Varagian Guard (sometimes referred to in period sources as pelekophori, literally “axe carriers”), in which Petersen’s type L/M axes were used for various ceremonies and saluting the monarch:

Guardsmen were holding them in the right hand, leaning the blade against the left wrist. When the Emperor came, they brought up the axes to lean them on their right shoulders. During the time of the name-day of the Emperor the Varangians saluted him and banged their axes, which emitted rhythmical sound.” (Kotowicz 2013: 52)

The distribution of axes along the Baltic Sea and the timing support this theory. Kotowicz also suggests that the use of perforated axes may be related to the cult of St. Olaf (Kotowicz 2013: 53). However, due to its use in the second half of the 10th century, we cannot agree with that. In addition to the above information, we can add that the hole in the blade certainly offered interesting options for attaching the case protecting the blade.

A Byzantine ivory plate depicting a man, apparently a member of Varangian Guard, with a two-handed axe and a sword. The axehead seems to be perforated. Dated around the year 1000.


Here we will finish this article. Thank you for your time and we look forward to any feedback. If you want to learn more and support my work, please, fund my project on Patreon or Paypal.


Bibliography

Brøndsted, Johannes (1936). Danish inhumation graves of the Viking Age. In: Acta Archaeologica VII: 81–228.

Danič 2015 = Данич А.В. (2015). Классификация средневековых топоров Пермского Предуралья // Труды КАЭЭ. Вып. X. Пермь. С. 71–124

Ewing, Thor (2006). Viking Clothing, Stroud.

Hansson, Pär (1983). Jägarbacken (Borrarbacken). Ett gravfält från yngre järnålder, Örebro.

Izmailov 1997 = Измайлов, И. Л. (1997). Вооружение и военное дело населения Волжской Булгарии X – начала XIII вв, Казань.

Jotov 2004 = Йотов, Валери (2004). Въоръжението и снаряжението от Българското средновековие VII— XI в., Варна.

Kočkarov 2006 = Кочкаров, У. Ю. (2006). Боевые топоры Северо-Западного Предкавказья VIII-XIV вв. // Arcaucasica.ru –археология Кавказа [online]. [cit. 2020-06-29].

Kotowicz, Piotr N. (2013). The Sign of the Cross on the Early Medieval Axes – A Symbol of Power, Magic or Religion? In: MAREK, Lech. Weapons Brings Peace? Warfare in Medieval and Early Modern Europe, Wratislavia Antiqua 18, Wrocław: 41–55, online.

Kotowicz, Piotr N. (2014). Topory wczesnośredniowieczne z ziem polskich : Katalog źródeł, Rzeszów.

Kotowicz, Piotr N. (2018). Early Medieval Axes from Territory of Poland, Kraków.

Luňák, Petr (2010). Výzdoba velkomoravských železných předmětů, Brno: Masarykova univerzita [diplomová práce].

Paulsen, Peter (1956). Axt und Kreuz in Nord- und Osteuropa, Bonn.

Pedersen, Anne (2008). Materiel kultur, identitet og kommunikation. In: Roesdahl, Else – Schjødt, Jens P. Beretning fra syvogtyvende tværfaglige vikingesymposium, 7–26.

Pedersen, Anne (2014). Dead Warriors in Living Memory. A study of weapon and equestrian burials in Viking-age Denmark, AD 800-1000, Publications from the National Museum. Studies in Archaeology & History Vol. 20:1 2. (Catalogue), Copenhagen.

Petersen, Jan (1919). De Norske Vikingsverd, Kristiania.

Roesdahl, Else – Wilson, David M. (2000). From Viking to Crusader: Scandinavia and Europe 800-1200, Uddevalla.

Schiørring, Ole (1978). Korset i øksen. In: Skalk 1978/6: 2829.

Thunmark-Nylén, Lena (1998). Die Wikingerzeit Gotlands II : Typentafeln, Stockholm.

Thunmark-Nylén, Lena (2006). Die Wikingerzeit Gotlands III: 1–2 : Text, Stockholm.

Thunmark-Nylén, Lena (2000). Die Wikingerzeit Gotlands IV:1–3 : Katalog, Stockholm.

Vlasatý, Tomáš (2015). Axe sheaths. In: Projekt Forlǫg: Reenactment a věda [online]. [cit. 2020-06-29]. Available at: http://sagy.vikingove.cz/pouzdra-na-sekery/

Vlasatý, Tomáš (2020a). The Axe from “Falköping Museum”. In: Projekt Forlǫg: Reenactment a věda [online]. [cit. 2020-06-29]. Available at: http://sagy.vikingove.cz/the-axe-from-falkoping-museum/

Vlasatý, Tomáš (2020b). Metal Axe Sheaths. In: Projekt Forlǫg: Reenactment a věda [online]. [cit. 2020-06-29]. Available at: http://sagy.vikingove.cz/metal-axe-sheaths/

Přehodnocení peněženky z Gokstadu

Peněženka z honosného hrobu z norského Gokstadu (počátek 10. století) patří mezi nejčastěji rekonstruované předměty raného středověku a je prodávána mnoha desítkami výrobců po celém světě. Její navržená rekonstrukce však pro svou nejednoznačnost opakovaně přitahuje pozornost reenactorů. V tomto článku se na peněženku podíváme podrobněji a navrhneme novou interpretaci, která doposud nebyla realizována. 


Dosavadní interpretace peněženky

Současná interpretace, která je používána reenactory a která je prezentována v akademické literatuře, byla navržena Birgit Heyerdahl-Larsen v jejím článku Gokstadhøvdingens pung (The Gokstad chiefstain´s pouch) roku 1981. V článku autorka doslova uvádí:

„V pohřební komoře byly spolu s osobními předměty náčelníka nalezeny kožené kusy, o kterých se Nicolaysen domníval, že jsou pozůstatky peněženky. Tyto kusy již bohužel neexistují. Kůže zřejmě vyschla a rozložila se, protože nebyla uložena v jílu. Moderní konzervační metody byly před stovkou let samozřejmě neznámé. V tomto článku se pustím do riskantního podniku a pokusím se [zrekonstruovat] peněženku na základě domněnek vyplývajících z nákresů třech kožených kusů publikovaných v The Viking-ship discovered at Gokstad in Norway a popisu, který lze nalézt v hlavním katalogu Kulturněhistorického muzea, jenž zní: 

‚Dva oválné kusy dvojité tenké kůže o velikosti 13,5 × 8,5 cm, na jedné hraně ostře uříznuté. Kusy si navzájem odpovídají a byly k sobě navzájem na okrajích přišité. Jeden kus má jemně provedené dekorativní otvory a byl podšit barevným materiálem, který musel v prostorech otvorů vytvářet příjemný kontrast. Pravděpodobně existoval další zdobený kus. Spolu s peněženkou byly nalezeny řemeny a podlouhlý, na obou koncích opotřebením zúžený kus, který byl od středu zdoben třemi řadami těsně naděrovaných otvorů. Švy podél okrajů zanechaly otvory ve všech těchto kusech.’ “ (Heyerdahl-Larsen 1981: 104)

Z textu vyplývá, že autorka peněženku nikdy neviděla a svou interpretaci založila na nákresu publikovaném Nicolaysenem (1882: Pl. IX.3-5) a popisu, který lze dnes nalézt v centrálním katalogu Unimus (Unimus 2020). Základem její interpretace je Nicolaysenova kresba oválného předmětu, ke kterému různými způsoby připevňuje kožený naděrovaný pás. Základem obou níže přiložených verzí je dvoudílná peněženka sešitá na okrajích, přičemž obě poloviny jsou zdobeny prořezaným ornamentem a uvnitř jsou vyloženy textilní výstelkou a opatřeny dvěma kapsami. Tento základ má podle autorky velikost 13,5 × 8,5 cm. Verze vlevo umisťuje naděrovaný kožený pás na ústí tohoto základu, zatímco verze vpravo tento pás umisťuje na okraj základu. Peněženka je v obou případech doplněna o držadlo, snad volně inspirované zužovaným koženým pásem, který Nicolaysem přiřadil k nálezu (1882: Pl. IX.5).

Interpretace navržené Birgitou Heyerdahl-Larsenovou.
Heyerdahl-Larsen 1981: 37.

Tuto interpretaci přebírají reenactoři po celém světě, kteří peněženku používají jako takřka jediný dochovaný exemplář svého druhu nalezený ve vikinském Norsku. V jejich rukách vznikají jak kusy, které se tvarově a materiálově shodují s navrženou rekonstrukcí, tak i verze, který se více či méně odchylují. Nejznatelnějším rozdílem mezi jednotlivými pokusy jsou rozměry, použitý kontrastní materiál a materiál vyztužení ústí, kterým se občas stává dřevo nebo paroh.

Verze peněženky vyrobená dle dosavadní interpretace.
Výrobce: Dominik Schörkl (vlevo), Královo řemeslo (vpravo).

Verze peněženky vyrobená dle dosavadní interpretace.
Výrobce: Bjorn This Way (vlevo), norther73 (vpravo).


Nesrovnalosti

Při detailnějším pohledu stávající interpretaci provází několik nesrovnalostí, které se týkají tří oblastí – tvaru, velikosti a konstrukce.

Tvar

Aby peněženka mohla být opatřena zesilující manžetou na ústí, Heyerdahl-Larsenová navrhuje tvar, který by bylo možné nazvat ledvinovitý. To je v rozporu s původním Nicolaysenovým nákresem, který ukazuje zaoblenější tvar a absenci manžety. Vezmeme-li do úvahy degradaci předmětu v době objevu, která mohla jednoduše zapříčinit zkreslení kresby, lze předpokládat, že předmět byl symetrický a měl tvar oválu anebo přesýpacích hodin.

Za zmínku rozhodně stojí, že také prořezávaná dekorace na Nicolaysenově kresbě působí poněkud rozdílně a fragilněji.

Původní Nicolaysenova kresba. Nicolaysen 1882: Pl. IX.3.

Velikost

Nejčastější otázka reenactorů na adresu gokstadské peněženky se týká rozměrů. Zde si nemůžeme odpustit kritiku Heyerdahl-Larsenové, která peněženku osobně neprozkoumala a považovala ji za zničenou. Pokud by podnikla snahu peněženku najít, zjistila by nejen, že existuje, ale také, že její velikost poněkud vybočuje od udaných informací. Připomínáme, že Heyerdahl-Larsenová udává rozměr 13,5 × 8,5 cm.

Do dnešního dne se v rozeznatelném stavu zachovala zhruba polovina předního dílu peněženky s jednou prořezanou spirálou. Její fotografie je digitalizována a uložena v centrálním katalogu Unimus pod katalogovým číslem C10460 (Unimus 2020). Z přiloženého měřítka, jehož správnost v osobní diskuzi potvrdil autor fotografie Vegard Vike, je patrné, že rozměr 13,5 × 8,5 cm se vztahuje pouze k této jedné polovině předmětu. Teoreticky vzato by tak celá peněženka nabývala velikosti zhruba 17 × 13,5 cm, což v kombinaci se zesilující manžetou a poutkem není příliš pravděpodobné.

Jistou indikací, jak veliký mohl být původní předmět, udává Nicolaysen ve své původní kresbě, která má uvedené měřítko 1:2. Drobné předměty, které jsou do dnešního dne zachované, jsme v souvislosti s měřítkem ověřili, s tím výsledkem, že předměty jsou zakresleny správně či pouze s minimálními odchylkami. Pokud tedy budeme měřítku důvěřovat, přední díl brašny dle kresby měřil zhruba 15 × 11 cm. Rozměry bohužel není možné ověřit v textové části Nicolaysenovy práce, která tento detail z důvodu velmi rychlého vypublikování neobsahuje.

Věříme, že rozdíl mezi 17 × 13,5 cm a 15 × 11 cm je způsoben skutečností, že fotografie současného stavu zkresluje. Předmět je natažený a oblast dekorace je významně roztažená, díky čemuž předmět působí relativně dlouze i široce. Pokud by bylo možné zúžit rozestupy mezi prořezanou dekorací na minimum, jako je tomu u Nicolaysenovy kresby, věříme, že by to ovlivnilo velikost. Z toho důvodu nelze brát rozměr 17 × 13,5 cm příliš směrodatně a je možné se přiklonit k menšímu rozměru, zhruba 15 × 11 cm. Přestože tento rozměr se nezdá jako dramaticky rozdílný oproti původní navrhované velikosti, jde o rozměr, který znemožňuje některé způsoby použití. Nutno v této souvislosti ještě připomenout poznámku konzervátora Vegarda Vikeho, že celý předmět velmi pravděpodobně po objevu prošel výrazným seschnutím, a tím pádem došlo ke smrštění. Odhadovanou velikost zakresleného stavu je proto potřeba brát s jistou rezervou a lze ji považovat za minimální. Další skutečnost, která musí nutně přijít do úvahy, je převracení hotového výrobku, kterým peněženka z Gokstadu určitě prošla.

Současný stav peněženky. Unimus 2020.

Konstrukce

Nesrovnalosti konečně vidíme v popisu, jak jsou jednotlivé díly peněženky poskládány. Nicolaysenův původní text obsahuje strohou následující větu, která pouze naznačuje, že kůže byla podšita barevnou textilií (Nicolaysen 1882: 47m):

Několik kožených fragmentů s jemnými otvory po švech, nepochybně pozůstatky peněženky, která byla uvnitř podšita barevnou textilií, jež bylo vidět skrze prořezy v kůži.

Nejvíce informací podává současná verze katalogu Unimus, která po jazykové stránce odpovídá vzniku v zhruba před 100 lety a z níž vycházela Heyerdahl-Larsenová (Unimus 2020):

„Několik kusů tenké kůže. Dva z těchto kusů jsou oválného tvaru, na jedné straně seříznuté do roviny, 13,5 cm široké a 8,5 cm vysoké, které si navzájem odpovídají a byly k sobě na okrajích přišité. Nepochybně se jedná o peněženku. Oba jsou z dvojité kůže, z nichž jeden je prořezán a byl na spodní straně podšit textilem. Zdá se, že existuje fragment dalšího prořezávaného kusu. Dalšími koženými kusy jsou řemeny, částečně s otvory po prošití ve středové části.

Tato zpráva je naprosto zásadní pro pochopení celého předmětu, neboť jde o nejstarší popis z doby, kdy byl předmět kompletnější, než je dnes. Dočítáme se o dvou dvouvrstvých oválných kusech o rozměru 13,5 × 8,5 cm, přičemž k sobě byly přišity a zdobený byl pouze jeden oválný dvouvrstvý kus. Současně se dozvídáme, že tento celek zřejmě měl stejně zdobený protikus. Z tohoto vyplývá, že text se vztahuje pouze k polovině peněženky, což fotografie předmětu potvrzuje – prořezaný díl je dvouvrstvý (druhý, neprořezaný dvouvrstvý díl není zachován) a rozměrově odpovídá.

Oproti tomu Heyerdahl-Larsenová klade rovnítko mezi Nicolaysenovu kresbu a popis dvou dvouvrstvých kusů. Dvouvrstvost si Heyerdahl-Larsenová vykládá tím, že peněženka “měla dvě kapsy” a informaci o prořezaném protikusu přetváří do myšlenky, že byla “pravděpodobně zdobená na obou stranách” (Heyerdahl-Larsen 1981: 37).

Řemení bylo k peněžence přiřazeno Nicolaysenem a jak bylo výše poznamenáno, oválný tvar nenasvědčuje navrhovanému použití řemenů. Objektivně vzato nelze potvrdit ani vyvrátit, zda řemení bylo skutečně součástí peněženky.


Nová interpretace

V červnu roku 2020 jsme byli kontaktování dánským řemeslníkem Thomasem Nicholsem z dílny Nichols Naturligvis, který upozornil na některé z výše uvedených nesrovnalostí a vyjádřil pochybnost, zda je peněženka rekonstruována správně. Společně jsme peněženku zevrubně prodiskutovali a touto cestou bychom rádi zveřejnili naše čtení předmětu, který byl – dle našeho soudu – dodnes chybně chápán.

Tvar peněženky lze zakládat na Nicolaysenově kresbě, která zobrazuje přibližně oválný tvar. Průřez peněženky je pak nutné zakládat na zprávě z katalogu Unimus – přední díl byl prořezaný, dvouvrstvý a přišitý k zadnímu, nezdobenému dvouvrstvému dílu, který musel představovat kapsu. Zadní zdobený díl peněženka postrádala. Z Nicolaysenova textu i katalogu vyplývá, že textilní vrstva z kontrastní látky byla umístěna mezi oba dvouvrstvé díly. Z tohoto vyplývá, že peněženka byla původně přehnutá a Nicolaysenova kresba zobrazuje peněženku v rozloženém stavu. Tuto úvahu podporují 4 symetricky umístěné otvory, které byly v dosavadní interpretaci považovány za dekoraci. Otvory lze chápat jako konstrukční rys sloužící k zapínání peněženky pomocí řemínku, který v nich byl zřejmě protažený. Stejným případem může být středový podlouhlý otvor, který nemusí být dekorací, nýbrž mohl sloužit k ukládání předmětů do peněženky.

Nejbližší analogií námi navržené interpretace je peněženka ze Sigtuny (Sigtuna Museum 2019aSigtuna Museum 2019b). Tento předmět, nalezený v lokalitě Trädgårdsmästaren a datovaný do let 1030-1050, sestává z předního dílu, který má velikost 14 × 11 cm, tvar přesýpacích hodin, jednoduchý geometrický dekor a možný středový otvor. Vnitřní díly peněženky chybí, stejně jako u současné verze gokstadského nálezu.

Peněženka ze Sigtuny. Sigtuna Museum 2019aSigtuna Museum 2019b.

Pokusná rekonstrukce peněženky ze Sigtuny. Autor: Oleksii Malev.

Vnitřní prostor peněženky nabízí více možných interpretací. V níže přiložené vizualizaci navrhujeme tři varianty:

  1. obě strany peněženky jsou k sobě přišity a peněženka není otevíratelná. Vnitřní prostor je půlen jedním dvouvrstvý koženým plátem, který vytváří dvě kapsy. Textilní vrstva zabraňuje vypadnutí předmětů, které jsou do peněženky zasouvány otvorem na horní hraně.
  2. obě strany peněženky jsou ponechány nesešité a peněženka je otevíratelná. Textilní vrstva je pošita koženým dílem, který je překryt dvěma kapsami. Otvor na horní hraně je překryt textilem.
  3. obě strany peněženky jsou ponechány nesešité a peněženka je otevíratelná. Textilní vrstva je částečně pošita koženým dílem, který je překryt dvěma kapsami. Otvor na horní hraně je překryt textilem. Prostor mezi koženým dílem a textilem lze využít k ukládání předmětů, peněženka tak má celkem čtyři kapsy.

Povahu použitého textilu bohužel neznáme. Jedinou informací, kterou máme k dispozici, je barevnost této textilní vrstvy, která vytvářela kontrast. Není nemožné, že se mohlo jednat o hedvábí, které je gokstadském hrobu zastoupeno (Vedeler 2014: 41-2).

Pozici řemení, které bylo k nálezu přiřazeno Nicolaysenem a následně interpretováno Heyerdahl-Larsenovou, nelze odhadnout. Neměli bychom vyloučit možnost, že tyto fragmenty vůbec nepřináleží k peněžence.


Vizualizace nové interpretace

V součinnosti s reenactorem a sedlářem Thomasem Nicholsem z dílny Nichols Naturligvis jsme připravili vizualizaci popsané interpretace, která v případě druhé varianty navrhuje konstrukci krok za krokem. Autor poznamenává, že výroba peněženky trvá zhruba 2,5 hodiny, což je v porovnání s 9-11 hodinami, které trvala výroba peněženky dosavadní interpretace, výrazné zrychlení.

Fotografie všech tří variant lze jednoduše stáhnout pomocí následujícího odkazu:


Varianta 1


 

Varianta 2

 

Varianta 3


Poděkování

Revize nálezu by nebyla možná bez všímavých očí a odhodlané mysli Thomase Nicholse z dílny Nichols Naturligvis, který vytvořil funkční model nově interpretované peněženky a kterému tímto srdečně děkujeme.

Pevně věřím, že jste si čtení tohoto článku užili. Pokud máte poznámku nebo dotaz, neváhejte mi napsat nebo se ozvat níže v komentářích. Pokud se Vám líbí obsah těchto stránek a chtěli byste podpořit jejich další fungování, podpořte, prosím, náš projekt na Patreonu nebo Paypalu.


Bibliografie

Heyerdahl-Larsen, Birgit (1981). Gokstadhøvdingens pung = The Gokstad chiefstain´s pouch. In: Wexelsen, Einar (ed). Gokstadfunnet : et 100-års minne = The Gokstad excavations : centenary of a Norwegian Viking find, Sandefjord, 36-7, 104-5.

Nicolaysen, Nicolay (1882). Langskibet fra Gokstad ved Sandefjord = The Viking-ship discovered at Gokstad in Norway, Kristiania.

Sigtuna Museum (2019a). Veckans föremål. In: Sigtuna Museum & Art. Navštíveno 19.3.2020, dostupné z: https://www.facebook.com/sigtunamuseumandart.se/photos/a.424430047633243/1963497667059799/?type=3.

Sigtuna Museum (2019b). Uppdatering av Veckans föremål. In: Sigtuna Museum & Art. Navštíveno 14.6.2020, dostupné z:
https://www.facebook.com/sigtunamuseumandart.se/photos/pcb.1991639364245629/1991636104245955/?type=3&theater.

Unimus (2020). C10460. In: Unimus [online]. [2020-06-14]. Dostupné z:
http://www.unimus.no/artefacts/khm/search/?oid=67669&museumsnr=C10460&f=html

Vedeler, Marianne (2014). Silk for the Vikings, Oxford – Philadelphia.

Rethinking the wallet from Gokstad

The wallet from the rich grave of Gokstad, Norway (early 10th century), is one of the most frequently reconstructed objects of the Early Middle Ages and is sold by many dozens of manufacturers around the world. However, its proposed reconstruction repeatedly attracts the attention of reenactors due to its ambiguity. In this article, we will take a closer look at the wallet and we will propose a new interpretation that has not yet been implemented.


Current interpretation of the wallet

The current interpretation, which is used by reenactors and which is presented in the academic literature, was proposed by Birgit Heyerdahl-Larsen in her article Gokstadhøvdingens pung (The Gokstad chiefstain´s pouch) in 1981. In the article, the author literally states:

[…] some ready-cut pieces of leather or hide which Nicolaysen believed to be the remains of a pouch, were found in the burial chamber along with the chieftain´s personal effects. Unfortunately the pieces no longer exist. Probably the leather dried up and disintergrated when no longer protected by the blue clay of the mound. A hundred years ago modern methods of preservation were of course unknown. Nevertheless I venture to make the «pouch» the theme of an article basing my assumptions on drawings of three of the leather pieces in the publication «The Viking Ship Discovered at Gokstad near Sandefjord» and a description in the main catalogue of the Museum of Antiquities which reads as follows

‚Two oval pieces of double thin hide, 13.5 × 8.5 cm, cut straight at one edge. The pieces correspond and have been sewn together at the edges. One piece has fine openwork patterning and was lined with a coloured material which must have offered a pleasing contrast to the hide at the aperture. There was preasumbly yet another patterned piece. There were also straps and an oblong piece, worn thin at both ends, decorated with three rows of closely-punched holes down the centre. The seams along the edges had left holes in all the pieces.’ “ (Heyerdahl-Larsen 1981: 104)

The text indicates that the author never saw the wallet and its interpretation based on a drawing published Nicolaysen (1882: Pl. IX.3-5) and a description that can be found today in the central catalog Unimus (Unimus 2020). The basis of her interpretation is Nicolaysen’s drawing of an oval object, to which she attaches a perforated leather belt in various ways. The basis of the two versions attached below is a two-part wallet sewn on the edges – both halves are decorated with a openwork and are lined with a textile inside and equipped with two pockets. According to the author, this base has a size of 13.5 × 8.5 cm. The version on the left places a perforated leather strip at the mouth of the pouch, while the version on the right places this strip all around the edge of the pouch. In both cases, the wallet is complemented by a handle, perhaps loosely inspired by a narrowed leather belt, which Nicolays assigned to the find (1882: Pl. IX.5).

Interpretations proposed by Birgit Heyerdahl-Larsen.
Heyerdahl-Larsen 1981: 37.

This interpretation is adopted by reenactors around the world, who use the wallet as almost the only surviving specimen of its kind found in Viking Age Norway. Sometimes both pieces are created to match the shape and material of the proposed reconstruction, other times the versions deviate more or less. The most noticeable differences between the individual trials are the dimensions, the contrast material and the material of the mouth reinforcement, which sometimes is wood or antler.

Version of the wallet made according to the current interpretation.
Maker: Dominik Schörkl (left), Královo řemeslo (right).

Version of the wallet made according to the current interpretation.
Maker: Bjorn This Way (left), norther73 (right).


Discrepancies

However, on closer inspection, the current interpretation is burdened by several inconsistencies that concern three areas – shape, size and construction.

Shape

In order to be equipped with a reinforcing cuff at the mouth, Heyerdahl-Larsen suggests a shape that could be called a kidney-shaped. This is in contrast to Nicolaysen’s original drawing, which shows a more rounded shape and the absence of a cuff. If we take into account the degradation of the object at the time of discovery, which could simply have caused the distortion of the drawing, it can be assumed that the object was symmetrical and had the shape of an oval or an hourglass.

It is definitely worth mentioning that the openwork also looks somewhat differently and more fragile in Nicolaysen’s drawing.

Original Nicolaysen’s drawing. Nicolaysen 1882: Pl. IX.3.

Size

The most common question of reenactors regarding the Gokstad wallet concerns dimensions. Here we cannot forgive the criticism of Heyerdahl-Larsen, who did not personally examine the wallet and considered it destroyed. If she made an effort to find a wallet, she would find not only that it existed, but also that its size deviated somewhat from the provided information. Let us remind that Heyerdahl-Larsen states the size of 13.5 × 8.5 cm.

To this day, about half of the front part of the wallet with one cut spiral has been preserved in a recognizable condition. Its photograph is digitized and stored in the central catalog Unimus under catalog number C10460 (Unimus 2020). From the attached scale, the accuracy of which was confirmed in a personal discussion by the author of the photograph Vegard Vike, it is clear that the size of 13.5 × 8.5 cm applies only to this one half of the object. Theoretically, the whole wallet would take on a size of about 17 × 13.5 cm, which in combination with a reinforcing cuff and loop is not very likely.

Nicolaysen gives a certain indication of how large the original object could have been in his original drawing, which has a 1:2 scale. We have checked other small objects from the book that are preserved to this day, with the result that the objects are drawn correctly or with only minimal deviations. Therefore, if we trust the scale, the front part of the bag measured approximately 15 × 11 cm according to the drawing. Unfortunately, it is not possible to verify the dimensions in the text part of Nicolaysen’s work, which does not contain this detail due to its very fast publication.

We believe that the difference between 17 × 13.5 cm and 15 × 11 cm is due to the fact that the photograph distorts the current state. The object is stretched and the area of ​​decoration is significantly stretched, which makes the object relatively long and wide. If it were possible to reduce the spacing between the openwork decoration to a minimum, as is the case with Nicolaysen’s drawing, we believe that it would affect the size. For this reason, the size of 17 × 13.5 cm cannot be taken too decisively and it is possible to lean towards a smaller size, approximately 15 × 11 cm. Although this dimension does not appear to be dramatically different from the original proposed size, it is a dimension that precludes some means of use. In this context, it is necessary to recall the remark of the conservator Vegard Vike that the whole object most likely underwent significant drying after the discovery, and thus shrinkage. The estimated size of the drawn state must therefore be taken with some reserve and can be considered as minimal. Another fact that must necessarily be considered is the turning of the finished product, which is certainly the case of the wallet from Gokstad.

Current state of the wallet. Unimus 2020.

Construction

We finally see the discrepancies in the description of how the individual parts of the wallet are constructed. Nicolaysen’s original text contains the following simple sentence, which only indicates that the leather was lined with colored fabric (Nicolaysen 1882: 47m):

m. divers fragments of leather with fine puctures […] doubtless parts of a purse which had been lined inside with coloured cloth, that has shown itself between the openings cut in the leather […].“

The current version of the Unimus catalog is the most infomative (Unimus 2020). In terms of language it corresponds to the period about 100 years ago. It is clear that Heyerdahl-Larsen based her infomation on this text:

‚Several piece of thin leather. Two of these pieces are oval, cut straight at one edge, 13.5 wide and 8.5 cm high, which correspond to each other and have been sewn together at the edges. Doubtless parts of a purse. Both pieces are made of two-layered leather, one of which has fine openwork patterning and was lined with textile. There was preasumbly yet another patterned piece. There were also straps, partially equipped with seam holes in the middle part.“

This report is absolutely essential for understanding the whole object, as it is the oldest description from when the object was more complete than it is today. We read about two two-layered oval pieces measuring 13.5 × 8.5 cm that are sewn together. Only one oval two-layered piece was decorated. At the same time, we learn that the piece probably had the same decorated counterpart. The text relates only to half of the wallet, which confirms the photograph of the object – the piece with the openwork is two-layered (the second, uncut two-layer part is not preserved) and corresponds in size.

Heyerdahl-Larsen, on the other hand, equates Nicolaysen’s drawing with the description of two two-layered pieces. Heyerdahl-Larsen interprets the two layer information as “two pockets” and transforms the information about the openwork counterpart into the idea that it was “probably decorated on both sides” (Heyerdahl-Larsen 1981: 37).

The belt was assigned to the wallet by Nicolaysen and, as noted above, the oval shape does not indicate the proposed use of the belts. Objectively speaking, it is not possible to confirm or refute whether the straps were in fact parts of the wallet.


New interpretation

In June 2020, we were contacted by the Danish craftsman Thomas Nichols from the Nichols Naturligvis workshop, who pointed out some of the above-mentioned discrepancies and expressed doubts whether the wallet was reconstructed correctly. We discussed the wallet in detail together and here we would like to publish our reading of the object, which – in our opinion – has been misunderstood to this day.

The shape of the wallet can be based on Nicolaysen’s drawing, which shows an approximately oval shape. The cross-section of the wallet must be based on a report from the Unimus catalog – the front had openwork, was two-layered and sewn to the back, undecorated two-layered part, which had to be a pocket. The back decorated part of the wallet was missing. Nicolaysen’s text and catalog show that the textile layer of contrasting fabric was placed between the two two-layered parts, where it prevented the deposited objects from falling out. It means that the wallet was originally folded and Nicolaysen’s drawing shows the wallet in an unfolded state. This reading is supported by 4 symmetrically placed holes, which in the previous interpretation were considered as decoration. The holes can be understood as a construction feature used to fasten a strap, which was apparently stretched in them. The same case may be the central elongated opening, which may not be a decoration but may have been used to store items in the wallet.

The closest analogy to our proposed interpretation is the wallet from Sigtuna (Sigtuna Museum 2019a; Sigtuna Museum 2019b). The object, found in Trädgårdsmästaren and dated to 1030-1050, consists of a front part measuring 14 × 11 cm, of a hourglass shape, with a simple geometric decor and a possible central opening. The inner parts of the wallet are missing, as with the current state of the Gokstad find.

The purse from Sigtuna. Sigtuna Museum 2019aSigtuna Museum 2019b.

Experimental reconstruction of the purse from Sigtuna. Author: Oleksii Malev.

The interior of the wallet offers several possible interpretations. In the visualization attached below, we propose three methods:

  1. both sides of the wallet are sewn together and the wallet is not openable. The interior is halved by one two-layered leather plate that creates two pockets. The textile layer prevents objects from falling out. The objects are inserted into the wallet through an opening on the upper edge.
  2. both sides of the wallet are left unstitched and the wallet is openable. The textile layer is covered with a leather part, which is then covered with two pockets. The opening on the upper edge is covered with textile.
  3. both sides of the wallet are left unstitched and the wallet is openable. The textile layer is partially covered with a leather part, which is then covered with two pockets. The opening on the upper edge is covered with textile. The space between the leather part and the textile can be used to store items, so the wallet has a total of four pockets.

Unfortunately, we do not know the nature of the textile used. The only information we have is the color of this textile layer, which created a contrast. It is not impossible that it may have been the silk, which is represented by the other find from Gokstad mound (Vedeler 2014: 41-2).

The position of the belt, which was assigned to the find by Nicolaysen and subsequently interpreted by Heyerdahl-Larsen, cannot be estimated. We should not rule out the possibility that these fragments do not belong to the wallet at all.


Visualization of the new interpretation

In collaboration with the reenactor and saddler Thomas Nichols from the Nichols Naturligvis workshop, we have prepared a visualization of the described interpretation, which proposes the construction step by step. The author notes that the production of the wallet takes about 2.5 hours, which is a significant acceleration compared to the 9-11 hours that took the production of the wallet of the current interpretation.

Pictures of the variants can be easily downloaded via the following link:


Variant 1


 

Variant 2

 

Variant 3


Acknowledgement

Revision of the find would not be possible without observant eyes and a determined mind of Thomas Nichols from Nichols Naturligvis workshop, who created functional models of the newly interpreted wallet and whom I warmly thank.

Here we will finish this article. Thank you for your time and we look forward to any feedback. If you want to learn more and support my work, please, fund my project on Patreon or Paypal.


Bibliography

Heyerdahl-Larsen, Birgit (1981). Gokstadhøvdingens pung = The Gokstad chiefstain´s pouch. In: Wexelsen, Einar (ed). Gokstadfunnet : et 100-års minne = The Gokstad excavations : centenary of a Norwegian Viking find, Sandefjord, 36-7, 104-5.

Nicolaysen, Nicolay (1882). Langskibet fra Gokstad ved Sandefjord = The Viking-ship discovered at Gokstad in Norway, Kristiania.

Sigtuna Museum (2019a). Veckans föremål. In: Sigtuna Museum & Art. Visited 19th March 2020, available from:
https://www.facebook.com/sigtunamuseumandart.se/photos/a.424430047633243/1963497667059799/?type=3.

Sigtuna Museum (2019b). Uppdatering av Veckans föremål. In: Sigtuna Museum & Art. Visited 14th June 2020, available from:
https://www.facebook.com/sigtunamuseumandart.se/photos/pcb.1991639364245629/1991636104245955/?type=3&theater.

Unimus (2020). C10460. In: Unimus [online]. [2020-06-14]. Available from:
http://www.unimus.no/artefacts/khm/search/?oid=67669&museumsnr=C10460&f=html

Vedeler, Marianne (2014). Silk for the Vikings, Oxford – Philadelphia.

Candle holders from Gokstad

In 1880, one of the two most magnificent mounds of the Viking Age was explored in Gokstad, Norway. Despite the extensive set of artifacts, including an almost complete ship, the whole find was published bilingually just two years later by Nicolay Nicolaysen. This haste has meant that the description of the objects is not detailed, which seems to be an unfortunate solution due to the gradual degradation of organic materials. In contrast to the Oseberg find, which was discovered in 1904 and published in detail in the following decades, the Gokstad mound still represents an insufficiently described grave. In the following article, we will try to repay this debt by describing four interesting artifacts, interpreted as candle holders.


Description

At the aft of the Gokstad ship, between the “tent” and the rudder, a number of objects made of wood and metal were discovered. Among them were also four boards of various shapes, made of 5-10 mm thick oak wood, which were discovered on the steerer’s bench (Nicolaysen 1882: 45d, Pl. VIII.5; Unimus 2020a). The common denominator of these boards is a similar size and a central circular or oval hole. In one case, the central hole is burnt out and the space around it is charred, as a result of which the boards are interpreted as simple candle holders, candles being inserted into their holes (Heyerdahl-Larsen 1981: 111; Nicolaysen 1882: 45d; Unimus 2020a). The boards are simply decorated in two cases. Today they are stored in the Cultural History Museum in Oslo under catalog number C10404 (Unimus 2020a).

Board No. 1: rectangular board measuring 18 × 15 × 1 cm (Unimus 2020a). The surface of this board is decorated with two pairs of concentric lines, between which there is a simple engraved plait. The immediate vicinity of a hole (⌀ 2.3 cm; 1.8 cm according to Heyerdahl-Larsen 1981: 111) is charred and burnt, which, according to commentators, indicates that the seated candle has fallen (Heyerdahl-Larsen 1981: 111; Nicolaysen 1882: 45d, Pl. VIII.5).

The biggest board. Nicolaysen 1882: Pl. VIII.5.

Board No. 2: a square-shaped board measuring approximately 16.5 × 16.5 cm (or 17 cm, Unimus 2020a). The corners of this board are cut in a quarter circle (Unimus 2020a). The hole has a diameter of about 2.1 cm.

Board No. 3 and 4: two board of approximately circular shape. A board with a larger hole (⌀ 2.6 cm) is 15.5 cm in diameter, while a plate with a smaller hole (⌀ 1.3 × 1.5 cm) has a diameter of 16 cm.

Photos of all four boards in order:
No. 4 (top left), No. 2 (top right), No. 1 (bottom left), No. 3 (bottom right).
Unimus 2020a.

All four boards in the exposition of the Cultural History Museum in Oslo.
World Tree Project 2020
.


Visualisation

The great craftsman Václav Maňha created a series of all three shapes of Gokstad candle holders, which he photographed for this project together with wax candles made by archaeologist and candlemaker Jakub Havlíček.


Interpretation

In our opinion, there is nothing to prevent the assignment of four boards to candle holders – the burning of one piece and the presence of holes are sufficiently eloquent arguments to support the current interpretation. Candle holders are a practical solution for how to carry and support a candle. The closest analogies are floor lamps with spikes, of which we know a total of 10 pieces from Norway (Petersen 1951: 430-433). However, these lamps are designed to be stuck in the floor. A somewhat more mobile candlestick could have been a simple metal spike with a sleeve for a handle from a blacksmith’s grave in Bygland, Norway (Blindheim 1962: 74, Fig. 10). Finally, other parallels are soapstone oil lamps (eg Petersen 1951: 361; Unimus 2020b).

Candles and their holders are found in aristocratic graves not only in Scandinavia but also in Eastern Europe, leading some researchers to believe that candles were “expensive and therefore rarely used” (Short 2010: 90) or that they were used “only in rich households” (Foote – Wilson 1990: 163). Other researchers say that “wax candles began to be used only with the advent of Christianity in the late 10th century, and if access to wax was limited, tallow was used” (Roesdahl-Wilson 2000: 138). Andrzej Janowski mapped 18 localities in Western, Northern and Eastern Europe, where candles were used in male and female graves of 7th-10th century, and he interprets the candles in the graves as a sign of Christian conversion and attributes them apotropaic significance (Janowski 2014). The opinion that the lighting of a candle in graves was carried out for protective reasons is shared by other authors (eg Roesdahl – Wilson 2000: 305, no. 296). Candles were usually placed in graves or on top of chamber graves and lit during funerals. In some cases a large number of candles were placed in the grave (Gnězdovo C-301: 11 candles, C-306: 12 candles), in other cases one large candle was placed in the grave, such as a candle from Mammen, which is 55.5-57.4 cm high and weighs 3.71 kg (Iversen-Näsman 1991: 57).

However, lighted candles can be understood from another perspective – the people responsible for organizing the funeral tried to appeal to all the senses of onlookers to get the feeling that the deceased continues in life (Gardeła 2016: 191). The burial chamber or mound was an allegory of the hall in which the deceased reigns in his majesty and in which he holds a feast. Sounds (rattles, jingle bells), scents (prepared food, herbs) and game of light (candles) were certainly used to intensify this feeling.


Acknowledgment

This article would not have been possible without Michael Caralps, who aroused our interest in the topic and provided the initial visualization. The craftsman Václav Maňha, who created and photographed reproductions of candle holders, deserves a heartfelt thank you.

Here we will finish this article. Thank you for your time and we look forward to any feedback. If you want to learn more and support my work, please, fund my project on Patreon or Paypal.


Bibliography

Bill, Jan (2013). Revisiting Gokstad. Interdisciplinary investigations of a find complex investigated in the 19th century: In: Sebastian Brather – Dirk Krausse (ed.). Fundmassen. Innovative Strategien zur Auswertung frühmittelalterlicher Quellenbestände, Darmstadt, 75–86.

Blindheim, Charlotte (1962). Smedgraven fra Bygland i Morgedal. Et Utsnitt av et større Arbeide. In: Viking 26, 25-80.

Foote, Peter – Wilson, David M. (1990). The Viking Achievement, Bath.

Gardeła, Leszek (2016). Worshipping the dead: Viking Age cemeteries as cult sites? In: Matthias Egeler (ed.). Germanische Kultorte. Vergleichende, historische und rezeptionsgeschichtliche Zugänge, München, 169-205.

Heyerdahl-Larsen, Birgit (1981). Litt om Gokstadskipets kjøkkentøy = Some kitchen utensils in the Gokstad ship. In: Wexelsen, Einar (ed). Gokstadfunnet : et 100-års minne = The Gokstad excavations : centenary of a Norwegian Viking find, Sandefjord, 45-7, 110-1.

Iversen, Mette  Näsman, Ulf (1991). Mammengravens indhold. In: Iversen, Mette et al. (ed.). Mammen. Grav, kunst og samfund i vikingetid, Århus, 4566.

Janowski, Andrzej (2014). Przestrzeń rozświetlona. Znaleziska świec i wosku w grobach komorowych na terenie Europy Środkowowschodniej. In: Tomasz Kurasiński – Kalina Skóra (eds.). Grób w przestrzeni. Przestrzeń w grobie. Przestrzenne uwarunkowania w dawnej obrzędowości pogrzebowej, Łódź, 121–130.

Nicolaysen, Nicolay (1882). Langskibet fra Gokstad ved Sandefjord = The Viking-ship discovered at Gokstad in Norway, Kristiania.

Petersen, Jan (1951). Vikingetidens Redskaper, Oslo.

Roesdahl, Else – Wilson, David M. (2000). From Viking to Crusader: Scandinavia and Europe 800-1200, Uddevalla.

Short, William R. (2010). Icelanders in the Viking Age: The People of the Sagas, Jefferson, NC.

Unimus (2020a). C10404. In: Unimus [online]. [2020-06-21]. Available from:
http://www.unimus.no/artefacts/khm/search/?oid=67607&museumsnr=C10404&f=html

Unimus (2020b). T9174. In: Unimus [online]. [2020-06-22]. Available from:
http://www.unimus.no/artefacts/vm/search/?oid=9789&museumsnr=T9174&f=html

World Tree Project (2020). 2224; Candlesticks from the Gokstad Burial. In: World Tree Project [online]. [2020-06-21]. Available from:
http://www.worldtreeproject.org/document/2224

Svícny z Gokstadu

Roku 1880 byl v norském Gokstadu prozkoumán jeden ze dvou nejvelkolepějších hrobů doby vikinské. Navzdory rozsáhlému souboru artefaktů, mezi nimiž drží hlavní příčku takřka kompletní plavidlo, byl celek dvojjazyčně vypublikován o pouhé dva roky později Nicolayem Nicolaysenem. Tato uspěchanost zapříčinila, že popis předmětů není detailní, což se vzhledem k postupné degradaci organických materiálů jeví jako nešťastné řešení. Oproti oseberskému souboru, který byl objeven roku 1904 a v následujících dekádách poměrně detailně publikován, představuje gokstadská mohyla stále nedostatečně popsaný hrob. V následujícím článku se pokusíme tento dluh splatit popsáním čtyř zajímavých artefaktů, interpretovaných jako svícny. 


Popis

Na samé zádi gokstadské lodě, mezi přístřeškem a kormidlem, bylo objeveno množství předmětů ze dřeva a kovu. Mezi nimi byly také čtyři desky o různých tvarech, vyrobené z 5-10 mm tlustého dubového dřeva, které byly objeveny na lodivodově lavici (Nicolaysen 1882: 45d, Pl. VIII.5; Unimus 2020a). Společným jmenovatelem těchto desek je podobná velikost a středový kruhový či oválný otvor. V jednom případě je středový otvor propálený a prostor kolem něj ohořelý, na základě čehož jsou desky interpretovány jako jednoduché svícny, do jejichž otvorů byly zavedené svíce (Heyerdahl-Larsen 1981: 111; Nicolaysen 1882: 45d; Unimus 2020a). Desky jsou ve dvou případech jednoduše zdobeny. Dnes jsou uloženy v Kulturněhistorickém muzeu v Oslu pod katalogovým číslem C10404 (Unimus 2020a).

Deska č. 1: deska s obdelníkovým tvarem o rozměrech 18 × 15 × 1 cm (Unimus 2020a). Povrch této desky je zdoben dvěma páry soustředných linií, mezi kterými se nachází jednoduchý rytý pletenec. Nejbližší okolí otvoru o průměru zhruba 2,3 cm (1,8 cm dle Heyerdahl-Larsen 1981: 111) je ohořelé a zuhelnatělé, což podle komentátorů svědčí o tom, že se usazená svíčka převrátila (Heyerdahl-Larsen 1981: 111; Nicolaysen 1882: 45d, Pl. VIII.5).

Největší deska. Nicolaysen 1882: Pl. VIII.5.

Deska č. 2: deska o čtvercovém tvaru o rozměrech zhruba 16,5 × 16,5 cm (či 17 cm, Unimus 2020a). Rohy této desky jsou čtvrtkruhově vykrojené (Unimus 2020a). Otvor má průměr zhruba 2,1 cm.

Deska č. 3 a 4: dvě desky o přibližně kruhovém tvaru. Deska s větším otvorem o průměru zhruba 2,6 cm má v průměru 15,5 cm, zatímco deska s menším otvorem o rozměrech zhruba 1,3 × 1,5 cm má průměr 16 cm.

Fotografie všech čtyřech desek v pořadí:
č. 4 (vlevo nahoře), č. 2 (vpravo nahoře), č. 1 (vlevo dole), č. 3 (vpravo dole).
Unimus 2020a.

Všechny čtyři desky v expozici Kulturně historického muzea v Oslu.
World Tree Project 2020.


Vizualizace

Skvělý řemeslník Václav Maňha vytvořil sérii všech tří tvarů gokstadských svícnů, které pro potřeby tohoto článku nafotil společně s voskovými svícemi vyrobenými archeologem a svíčkařem Jakubem Havlíčkem.


Pokus o interpretaci

Dle našeho soudu přiřazení čtyř desek ke svícnům nic nebrání – ohoření jednoho kusu a přítomnost otvorů jsou dostatečně výmluvné argumenty pro podpoření stávající interpretace. Svícny představují praktické řešení, jak lze přenášet a podepřít svíčku. Nejbližší analogií jsou stojací lampy s bodákem, jichž z Norska známe celkem 10 kusů a které sloužily k nabodnutí svíčky (Petersen 1951: 430-433). Tyto lampy jsou však určeny k zabodnutí do podlahy. Poněkud mobilnějším svícnem mohl být jednoduchý kovový bodák s objímkou pro násadu z kovářova hrobu z norského Byglandu (Blindheim 1962: 74, Fig. 10). Konečně dalšími paralelami jsou mastkové olejové lampičky (např. Petersen 1951: 361; Unimus 2020b).

Svíčky a jejich držáky jsou nacházeny v aristokratických hrobech nejen ve Skandinávii, ale také ve východní Evropě, což vede některé badatele k názoru, že svíčky byly “drahé, a proto zřídka používané” (Short 2010: 90) či že byly používané “jen na bohatých statcích” (Foote – Wilson 1990: 163). Jiní badatelé říkají, že “voskové svíčky se začaly používat až s příchodem křesťanství na konci 10. století a v případě, že byl přístup k vosku omezený, se používal lůj” (Roesdahl – Wilson 2000: 138). Andrzej Janowski zmapoval 18 lokalit v západní, severní a východní Evropě, kde byly svíčky použity v mužských i ženských hrobech 7.-10. století, a svíčky v hrobech interpretuje jako známku křesťanské konverze a přisuzuje jim apotropaický význam (Janowski 2014). Názor, že zapálení svíčky v hrobech bylo prováděno z ochranných důvodů, sdílí i jiní autoři (např. Roesdahl – Wilson 2000: 305, no. 296). Obvykle se svíčky umisťovaly do hrobů či na horní desky komorových hrobů a během pohřbů se zapalovaly. V některých případech bylo do hrobu ukládáno větší množství svíček (Gnězdovo C-301: 11 svíček, C-306: 12 svíček), v jiných případech byla do hrobu umístěna jedna velká svíce, jako například svíce z Mammenu, která má 55,5-57,4 cm na výšku a váží 3,71 kg (Iversen – Näsman 1991: 57).

Zapálené svíce lze však chápat i jinou optikou – lidé zodpovědní za organizaci pohřbu se snažili apelovat na všechny smysly přihlížejících, aby docílili pocitu, že zemřelý pokračuje v životě (Gardeła 2016: 191). Pohřební komora či mohyla byla alegorií síně, ve které zemřelý panuje ve svém majestátu a ve které pořádá hostinu. K umocnění tohoto pocitu se určitě využívalo zvuků (chrastidla, rolničky), vůní (připravený pokrm, byliny) a hry světla (svíce).


Poděkování

Tento článek by nevznikl bez Michaela Caralpse, který v nás probudil zájem o téma a poskytl prvotní vizualizaci. Srdečné poděkování si zaslouží řemeslník Václav Maňha, který vytvořil a nafotil reprodukce svícnů.

Pevně věřím, že jste si čtení tohoto článku užili. Pokud máte poznámku nebo dotaz, neváhejte mi napsat nebo se ozvat níže v komentářích. Pokud se Vám líbí obsah těchto stránek a chtěli byste podpořit jejich další fungování, podpořte, prosím, náš projekt na Patreonu nebo Paypalu


Bibliografie

Bill, Jan (2013). Revisiting Gokstad. Interdisciplinary investigations of a find complex investigated in the 19th century: In: Sebastian Brather – Dirk Krausse (ed.). Fundmassen. Innovative Strategien zur Auswertung frühmittelalterlicher Quellenbestände, Darmstadt, 75–86.

Blindheim, Charlotte (1962). Smedgraven fra Bygland i Morgedal. Et Utsnitt av et større Arbeide. In: Viking 26, 25-80.

Foote, Peter – Wilson, David M. (1990). The Viking Achievement, Bath.

Gardeła, Leszek (2016). Worshipping the dead: Viking Age cemeteries as cult sites? In: Matthias Egeler (ed.). Germanische Kultorte. Vergleichende, historische und rezeptionsgeschichtliche Zugänge, München, 169-205.

Heyerdahl-Larsen, Birgit (1981). Litt om Gokstadskipets kjøkkentøy = Some kitchen utensils in the Gokstad ship. In: Wexelsen, Einar (ed). Gokstadfunnet : et 100-års minne = The Gokstad excavations : centenary of a Norwegian Viking find, Sandefjord, 45-7, 110-1.

Iversen, Mette  Näsman, Ulf (1991). Mammengravens indhold. In: Iversen, Mette et al. (ed.). Mammen. Grav, kunst og samfund i vikingetid, Århus, 4566.

Janowski, Andrzej (2014). Przestrzeń rozświetlona. Znaleziska świec i wosku w grobach komorowych na terenie Europy Środkowowschodniej. In: Tomasz Kurasiński – Kalina Skóra (eds.). Grób w przestrzeni. Przestrzeń w grobie. Przestrzenne uwarunkowania w dawnej obrzędowości pogrzebowej, Łódź, 121–130.

Nicolaysen, Nicolay (1882). Langskibet fra Gokstad ved Sandefjord = The Viking-ship discovered at Gokstad in Norway, Kristiania.

Petersen, Jan (1951). Vikingetidens Redskaper, Oslo.

Roesdahl, Else – Wilson, David M. (2000). From Viking to Crusader: Scandinavia and Europe 800-1200, Uddevalla.

Short, William R. (2010). Icelanders in the Viking Age: The People of the Sagas, Jefferson, NC.

Unimus (2020a). C10404. In: Unimus [online]. [2020-06-21]. Dostupné z:
http://www.unimus.no/artefacts/khm/search/?oid=67607&museumsnr=C10404&f=html

Unimus (2020b). T9174. In: Unimus [online]. [2020-06-22]. Dostupné z:
http://www.unimus.no/artefacts/vm/search/?oid=9789&museumsnr=T9174&f=html

World Tree Project (2020). 2224; Candlesticks from the Gokstad Burial. In: World Tree Project [online]. [2020-06-21]. Dostupné z:
http://www.worldtreeproject.org/document/2224

Wood species used for sword grips

In the internet discussions, I was asked whether I happened to have any source that would describe the wood species used for swords grips in 9th-11th century. As I went through the archaeological materials, I was surprised to find that this detail is rarely mentioned and is missing in the monographs. Therefore, I decided to describe 18 analyzed grips from the period.


Introduction

If we approach the the period swords in general, first of all we surprised by the low number of analyzed wooden grips compared to the huge number of several thousand swords that we have at our disposal.

Several factors contribute to this fact. Well-preserved handles that could be analyzed are generally rare and are usually associated with swords found in water or well-preserved graves. A large number of swords were discovered more than 50 years ago, when it was not the standard to publish swords in detail with analyzes, and over time, organic components often degraded so that they could not be examined at this time. A specific case is the Mikulčice swords – the organic parts of which burnt during a depository fire in the 2007. Some well-preserved handles, which are still covered with a metal, textile or leather wrapping, are not analyzed to prevent damage to the wrapping. The main reason, however, is the general lack of interest in the analysis of the organic parts of swords, which often persists to this day.

The absence of analyzes of used tree species in monographs (eg Androščuk 2014; Geibig 1991; Košta – Hošek 2014) means that no serious attempt has been made to summarize the issue so far. The catalog below is probably the most extensive work that can be continuously supplemented with new findings.


Analyzed grips

 

Cirkovljan-Diven, Croatia

A sword belonging to Petersen’s type K, found at the bottom of Drava River. The handle, which is one of the best-preserved organic grips of the period, is made in one piece, is barrel-shaped, oval in cross-section and has been wrapped in a 2 cm wide linen ribbon.

Material: beech.
Source: Bilogrivić 2009: 132-3.

The sword from Cirkovljan-Diven. Bilogrivić 2009: T. III: 3.

Lednica, Poland

A sword with brazil nut pommel (MPP/A/31/33/84), belonging to type α var. 1 according to Nadolski and type X.A/B.1 according to Oakeshott, was discovered at the bottom of Lednica Lake. The grip was made of four parts attached to the sides of the tang, which were densely wrapped with a strip of leather.

Material: all four parts of the grip are made of maple.
Source: Stępnik 2011: 71.

The sword from Lednica. Stępnik 2011: Fot. 1, 2.

Lednica, Poland

Petersen’s type H sword (MPP/A/74/3/94), found at the bottom of Lednica Lake, has a handle made of four parts attached to the sides of the tang. The parts fit together and show no signs of gripping, which may indicate the use of glue.

Material: wider parts are made of yew, side parts are made of maple.
Source: Stępnik 2011: 71-2.

The sword from Lednica. Stępnik 2011: Fot. 3, 4.

Giecz, Poland

A Mannheim or H-type sword, found in connection with a former bridge, has a preserved piece of wood on one side of the tang that can be analyzed. The construction of the handle is not known, the wrapping is not visible.

Material of the preserved piece: deciduous tree wood.
Source: Stępnik 2011: 73.

The sword from Giecz. Stępnik 2011: Fot. 5, 6.


Donnybrook, Ireland

The type D sword found in the mound had a grip fitted with metal ferrules, thanks to which a piece of analyzable wood was preserved.

Material: coniferous wood.
Source: Hall 1978: 79.

The sword from Donnybrook. Hall 1978: Fig. 4.

Haithabu, Germany

In his detailed study of swords from the port of Haithabu, Alfred Geibig states that for five swords it was possible to determine what kind of wood was used to make the grip. The grips are fragmentary and their construction, shape and cross-section cannot be determined.

Grip material of the sword No. 1 (Mannheim type): maple. Scabbard made of oak.
Grip material of the sword No. 2 (Petersen type H): alder. Scabbard made of beech.
Grip material of the sword No. 3 (Petersen type H?): willow. Scabbard made of alder.
Grip material of the sword No. 5 (Petersen type N): alder. Scabbard made of beech.
Grip material of the sword No. 12 (type unceirtan): willow.
Source: Geibig 1999: 40.


Hegge Østre, Norway

The L-type sword found in the mound (T16054) has an exceptionally well-preserved handle with silver ferrules.

Material: from the look of the grip, it is clear that the wood used was Karelian birch.
Source: Unimus 2020a.

The sword from Hegge Østre. Unimus 2020a.


Hoven, Norway

The L-type sword found in the mound (T8257) has an exceptionally well-preserved handle with silver ferrules.

Material: from the look of the grip, it is clear that the wood used was Karelian birch, similarly to the sword from Hegge Østre.
Source: Unimus 2020b.

The sword from Hoven. Unimus 2020b.

Gulli, Norway

The M-type sword found in the tomb (C53315) has a well-preserved grip of oval cross-section that was most likely wrapped.

Material: linden. The same material was used to make the scabbard and axe shaft from the same grave.
Source: Gjerpe 2005: 40-1.

The sword from Gulli. Gjerpe 2005: Figur 22.


Gulli, Norway

The L-type sword found in the tomb (C53660) has a well-preserved handle with metal ferrules.

Material: oak. The same material was used to make the scabbard, axe shaft, knife handle, chest, hammer and some other pieces of tools from the same grave.
Source: Gjerpe 2005: 62.

The sword from Gulli. Gjerpe 2005: Figur 39.


Klepp, Norway

A sword of the indeterminate type found in the tomb (S12274) has a partially preserved handle of oval cross-section.

Material: most likely birch. The same material was probably used to make a knife handle from the same grave.
Source: Unimus 2020c.

The sword from Klepp. Unimus 2020c.


Tjora, Norway

The H-type sword found in the grave (S5460) has a partially preserved handle.

Material: deciduous tree wood.
Source: Unimus 2020d.


Dalen, Norway

The H-type sword accidentally found during plowing (T20736) has a partially preserved handle.

Material: deciduous tree wood.
Source: Unimus 2020e.

The sword from Dalen. Unimus 2020e.


Repton, Great Britain

The M-type sword found in grave No. 511 has a partially preserved handle of oval cross-section that has been wrapped in a strip of fabric.

Material: coniferous wood.
Source: Biddle – Kjølbye-Biddle 1992: 49.

The sword from Repton. Biddle – Kjølbye-Biddle 1992: Fig. 5.7.


Conclusions

The wooden grips of the swords were made by different methods, in different shapes and also from different materials. The information contained in the catalog allows us to state that the grips were usually made from locally available wood species. However, we would like to point out four interesting facts.

The grips are more often made of deciduous trees. Maple, beech and oak are known for their strength and durability and were often used in the early Middle Ages to make handles and shafts. The choice of linden, willow or conifer shows a lack of these materials or other preferences in the design of the handle.

An interesting phenomenon is the use of two materials in the case of the H-type sword from Lednica, Poland. This solution probably has no practical or aesthetic meaning and could have a certain symbolism for the owner (Stępnik 2011: 79).

Although most of the wooden handles were covered with a textile or leather strap, two Norwegian L-type swords show that an aesthetically impressive material was deliberately chosen that was not wrapped in any way.

The last interesting point is the match or mismatch of the grip material with the scabbard material. In the case of Haithabu swords, the examined grips do not correspond to the scabbards, but in the case of the Gulli tombs, it is clear that almost all the wooden products contained in the tombs were made from the same materials. This fact may be conditioned by the unavailability of other tree species, but perhaps also by the practical handling of the material. The idea of production of all the tool and weapon handles at one time – whether before or after the death of a man buried in a grave – is very tempting.


Here we will finish this article. Thank you for your time and we look forward to any feedback. If you want to learn more and support my work, please, fund my project on Patreon or Paypal.


Bibliography

Androščuk, Fedir (2014). Viking Swords : Swords and Social aspects of Weaponry in Viking Age Societies, Stockholm.

Biddle, Martin – Kjølbye-Biddle, Birthe (1992). Repton and the Vikings. In: Antiquity, Vol. 66, 38–51.

Bilogrivić, Goran (2009). Karolinški mačevi tipa K / Type K Carolingian Swords. In: Opuscula archaeologica 33, 125–82.

Geibig, Alfred (1991). Beiträge zur morphologischen Entwicklung des Schwertes im Mittelalter : eine Analyse des Fundmaterials vom ausgehenden 8. bis zum 12. Jahrhundert aus Sammlungen der Bundesrepublik Deutschland, Neumünster.

Geibig, Alfred (1999). Die Schwerter aus dem Hafen von Haithabu. In: Berichte über die Ausgrabungen in Haithabu 33, Neumünster, 9-99.

Gjerpe, Lars Erik (2005). Gravene: en kort gjennomgang. In: Gjerpe, Lars Erik (ed.). Gravfeltet på Gulli. E18-prosjektet Vestfold. Bind I. Varia 60, 24-104.

Farrar, R. A. – Hall, R. A.(1978). A Viking-age Grave at Donnybrook, Co. Dublin. Medieval Archaeology, 22(1), 64–83

Košta, Jiří – Hošek, Jiří (2014). Early Medieval swords from Mikulčice, Brno : Institute of Archaeology of the Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic.

Stępnik, Tomasz (2011). Drewniane okładziny rękojeści mieczy. In: Wyrwa, A. M. – Sankiewicz, P. – Pudło, P. (2011). Miecze średniowieczne z Ostrowa Lednickiego i Giecza, Dziekanowice – Lednica, 71-79.

Unimus (2020a). T16054. In: Unimus [online]. [2020-06-09]. Available from:
http://www.unimus.no/artefacts/vm/search/?oid=180869&museumsnr=T16054&f=html

Unimus (2020b). T8257. In: Unimus [online]. [2020-06-09]. Available from:
http://www.unimus.no/artefacts/vm/search/?oid=8897&museumsnr=T8257&f=html

Unimus (2020c). S12274. In: Unimus [online]. [2020-06-09]. Available from:
http://www.unimus.no/artefacts/am/search/?oid=34514&museumsnr=S12274&f=html

Unimus (2020d). S5460. In: Unimus [online]. [2020-06-09]. Available from:
http://www.unimus.no/artefacts/am/search/?oid=19688&museumsnr=S5460&f=html

Unimus (2020e). T20736. In: Unimus [online]. [2020-06-09]. Available from:
http://www.unimus.no/artefacts/vm/search/?oid=37376&museumsnr=T20736&f=html

Druhy dřeva na rukojetích mečů

V rámci internetových diskuzí jsem byl dotázán, zda nedisponuji materiály, které by popisovaly druhy dřev použité na rukojetích mečů z 9.-11. století. Když jsem se probíral archeologickými materiály, s překvapením jsem zjistil, že tento detail je jen zřídkakdy zmiňován a chybí v monografiích. Proto jsem se rozhodl popsat 18 rukojetí z vymezeného období, u nichž byl proveden rozbor.


Úvod do problému

Přistoupíme-li k mečům vymezeného období jako celku, v první řadě nás zaručeně překvapí nízké množství analyzovaných dřevěných rukojetí v porovnání s ohromným množstvím několika tisíc mečů, které máme k dispozici.

Na této skutečnosti se podílí několik faktorů. Dobře zachovaných rukojetí, u kterých by bylo možné provádět analýzy, je obecně málo a obvykle se pojí s meči nalezenými ve vodě nebo dobře zakonzervovaných hrobech. Velké množství takových mečů bylo objeveno před více než 50 lety, kdy nebylo standardem meče publikovat detailním způsobem s analýzami, a v průběhu času organické komponenty často zdegradovaly tak, že je není možné v současné chvíli zkoumat. Specifickým případem jsou mikulčické meče, jejichž organické části podlehly ohni při požáru depozitu roku 2007. Některé dobře zachované rukojeti, které jsou stále kryté kovovou, textilní nebo koženou omotávkou, nejsou analyzované proto, aby nedošlo k poškození omotávky. Zásadním důvodem je však obecný nezájem o analýzy organických částí mečů, který mnohdy bohužel přetrvává do dnešních dob.

Absence analýz použitých dřevin v monografiích (např. Androščuk 2014; Geibig 1991; Košta – Hošek 2014) znamená, že doposud nebyl proveden žádný seriózní pokus shrnout problematiku. Níže přiložený katalog je tak zřejmě nejrozsáhlejším počinem, který může být průběžně doplňován o nové nálezy.


Prozkoumané rukojeti

 

Cirkovljan-Diven, Chorvatsko

Meč náležící k Petersenovu typu K, nalezený na dně Drávy. Rukojeť, která patří mezi nejlépe zachované organické rukojeti sledovaného období, je vyrobena z jednoho kusu, je soudkovitého tvaru, oválného průřezu a byla omotána 2 cm širokou lněnou stuhou.

Materiál rukojeti: buk.
Zdroj: Bilogrivić 2009: 132-3.

Meč z Cirkovljan-Diven. Bilogrivić 2009: T. III: 3.

Lednica, Polsko

Meč s paraořechovou hlavicí (MPP/A/31/33/84), přináležící k typu α var. 1 dle Nadolského a typu X.A/B.1 dle Oakeshotta, byl objeven na dně Lednického ostrova. Rukojeť byla vyrobena ze čtyř dílů přiložených na boky řapu, které byly hustě omotány proužkem kůže.

Materiál: všechny čtyři díly rukojeti jsou vyrobeny z javoru.
Zdroj: Stępnik 2011: 71.

Meč z Lednice. Stępnik 2011: Fot. 1, 2.

Lednica, Polsko

Meč Petersenova typu H (MPP/A/74/3/94), nalezený na dně Lednického ostrova, má rukojeť vyrobenou ze čtyř dílů přiložených na boky řapu. Díly k sobě doléhají a nenesou známky omotávky, což může naznačovat použití lepidla.

Materiál: širší díly jsou vyrobeny z tisu, boční díly jsou vyrobeny z javoru.
Zdroj: Stępnik 2011: 71-2.

Meč z Lednice. Stępnik 2011: Fot. 3, 4.

Giecz, Polsko

Meč typu Mannheim či H, nalezený v souvislosti s bývalým mostem, má na jedné straně řapu zachovaný kus dřeva, který lze analyzovat. Konstrukce rukojeti není známa, omotávka není patrná.

Materiál zachovaného dílu: dřevo listnatého stromu.
Zdroj: Stępnik 2011: 73.

Meč z Giecze. Stępnik 2011: Fot. 5, 6.


Donnybrook, Irsko

Meč typu D nalezený v mohyle měl rukojeť opatřenou kovovými objímkami, díky kterým se zachoval kus analyzovatelného dřeva.

Materiál: dřevo jehličnatého stromu.
Zdroj: Hall 1978: 79.

Meč z Donnybrooku. Hall 1978: Fig. 4.

Haithabu, Německo

Alfred Geibig ve svém detailním zpracování mečů z přístavu v Haithabu uvádí, že u pěti mečů bylo možné určit, jaký druh dřeva byl použit na výrobu rukojeti. Rukojeti jsou fragmentární a jejich konstrukce, tvar ani průřez nelze určit.

Materiál rukojeti meče č. 1 (typ Mannheim): javor. Pochva vyrobena z dubu.
Materiál rukojeti meče č. 2 (Petersenův typ H): olše. Pochva vyrobena z buku.
Materiál rukojeti meče č. 3 (Petersenův typ H?): vrba. Pochva vyrobena z olše.
Materiál rukojeti meče č. 5 (Petersenův typ N): olše. Pochva vyrobena z buku.
Materiál rukojeti meče č. 12 (typ nejednoznačný): vrba.
Zdroj: Geibig 1999: 40.


Hegge Østre, Norsko

Meč typu L nalezený v mohyle (T16054) má výjimečně dobře zachovanou rukojeť opatřenou stříbrnými objímkami.

Materiál: z vizuálu rukojeti je patrné, že použitou dřevinou byla karelská bříza.
Zdroj: Unimus 2020a.

Meč z Hegge Østre. Unimus 2020a.


Hoven, Norsko

Meč typu L nalezený v mohyle (T8257) má výjimečně dobře zachovanou rukojeť opatřenou stříbrnými objímkami.

Materiál: z vizuálu rukojeti je patrné, že použitou dřevinou byla karelská bříza, stejně jako u meče z Hegge Østre.
Zdroj: Unimus 2020b.

Meč z Hovenu. Unimus 2020b.

Gulli, Norsko

Meč typu M nalezený v hrobu (C53315) má dobře zachovanou rukojeť oválného průřezu, která byla velmi pravděpodobně omotána.

Materiál: lípa. Stejný materiál byl použit na výrobu pochvy a topůrka sekery ze téhož hrobu.
Zdroj: Gjerpe 2005: 40-1.

Meč z Gulli. Gjerpe 2005: Figur 22.


Gulli, Norsko

Meč typu L nalezený v hrobu (C53660) má dobře zachovanou rukojeť opatřenou kovovými objímkami.

Materiál: dub. Stejný materiál byl použit na výrobu pochvy, topůrka sekery, rukojeti nože, truhly, kladiva a některých dalších kusů nářadí z téhož hrobu.
Zdroj: Gjerpe 2005: 62.

Meč z Gulli. Gjerpe 2005: Figur 39.


Klepp, Norsko

Meč neurčitého typu nalezený v hrobu (S12274) má částečně zachovanou rukojeť oválného průřezu.

Materiál: s největší pravděpodobností bříza. Stejný materiál byl pravděpodobně použit na výrobu rukojeti nože z téhož hrobu.
Zdroj: Unimus 2020c.

Meč z Kleppu. Unimus 2020c.


Tjora, Norsko

Meč typu H nalezený v hrobu (S5460) má částečně zachovanou rukojeť.

Materiál: dřevo listnatého stromu.
Zdroj: Unimus 2020d.


Dalen, Norsko

Meč typu H náhodně nalezený při orbě (T20736) má částečně zachovanou rukojeť.

Materiál: dřevo listnatého stromu.
Zdroj: Unimus 2020e.

Meč z Dalenu. Unimus 2020e.


Repton, Velká Británie

Meč typu M nalezený v hrobu č. 511 má částečně zachovanou rukojeť oválného průřezu, která byla ovinuta pruhem textilu.

Materiál: jehličnaté dřevo.
Zdroj: Biddle – Kjølbye-Biddle 1992: 49.

Meč z Reptonu. Biddle – Kjølbye-Biddle 1992: Fig. 5.7.


Závěr

Dřevěné rukojeti mečů byly vyráběny různými metodami, v různých tvarech a také z různých materiálů. Informace obsažené v katalogu nám umožňují tvrdit, že rukojeti byly zpravidla vyráběny z místních dostupných dřevin. Nicméně bychom rádi upozornili na čtyři zajímavé skutečnosti z katalogu vyplývající.

Rukojeti jsou častěji vyráběné z listnatých dřevin. Javor, buk a dub jsou známé pro svoji pevnost i odolnost a v raném středověku byly často používány pro výrobu násad a rukojetí. Volba lípy, vrby nebo jehličnanů ukazuje nedostatek těchto materiálů nebo jiné preference při konstrukci rukojetí.

Zajímavým úkazem je použití dvou materiálů v případě meče typu H z polské Lednice. Toto řešení pravděpodobně nemá žádný praktický ani estetický rozměr a mohlo mít určitou symboliku pro nositele (Stępnik 2011: 79).

Přestože většina dřevěných rukojetí byla překryta textilním nebo koženým řemínkem, dva norské meče typu L ukazují, že byl záměrně zvolen esteticky působivý materiál, který nebyl nijak omotáván.

Posledním zajímavým bodem je shoda či neshoda materiálu rukojeti s materiálem pochvy. V případě mečů z Haithabu zkoumané rukojeti materiálově neodpovídají pochvám, avšak v případě hrobů z Gulli je patrné, že stejné materiály byly použity takřka všechny dřevěné výrobky obsažené v hrobech. Tato skutečnost může být podmíněná nedostupností jiných druhů dřevin, ale možná také praktickým zacházením s materiálem. Myšlenka, která operuje výrobou všech nástrojových a zbraňových rukojetí v jeden okamžik – ať už před smrtí nebo po smrti člověka uloženého v hrobu – , je velmi lákavá.


Pevně věřím, že jste si čtení tohoto článku užili. Pokud máte poznámku nebo dotaz, neváhejte mi napsat nebo se ozvat níže v komentářích. Pokud se Vám líbí obsah těchto stránek a chtěli byste podpořit jejich další fungování, podpořte, prosím, náš projekt na Patreonu nebo Paypalu


Bibliografie

Androščuk, Fedir (2014). Viking Swords : Swords and Social aspects of Weaponry in Viking Age Societies, Stockholm.

Biddle, Martin – Kjølbye-Biddle, Birthe (1992). Repton and the Vikings. In: Antiquity, Vol. 66, 38–51.

Bilogrivić, Goran (2009). Karolinški mačevi tipa K / Type K Carolingian Swords. In: Opuscula archaeologica 33, 125–82.

Geibig, Alfred (1991). Beiträge zur morphologischen Entwicklung des Schwertes im Mittelalter : eine Analyse des Fundmaterials vom ausgehenden 8. bis zum 12. Jahrhundert aus Sammlungen der Bundesrepublik Deutschland, Neumünster.

Geibig, Alfred (1999). Die Schwerter aus dem Hafen von Haithabu. In: Berichte über die Ausgrabungen in Haithabu 33, Neumünster, 9-99.

Gjerpe, Lars Erik (2005). Gravene: en kort gjennomgang. In: Gjerpe, Lars Erik (ed.). Gravfeltet på Gulli. E18-prosjektet Vestfold. Bind I. Varia 60, 24-104.

Farrar, R. A. – Hall, R. A.(1978). A Viking-age Grave at Donnybrook, Co. Dublin. Medieval Archaeology, 22(1), 64–83

Košta, Jiří – Hošek, Jiří (2014). Early Medieval swords from Mikulčice, Brno : Institute of Archaeology of the Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic.

Stępnik, Tomasz (2011). Drewniane okładziny rękojeści mieczy. In: Wyrwa, A. M. – Sankiewicz, P. – Pudło, P. (2011). Miecze średniowieczne z Ostrowa Lednickiego i Giecza, Dziekanowice – Lednica, 71-79.

Unimus (2020a). T16054. In: Unimus [online]. [2020-06-09]. Dostupné z:
http://www.unimus.no/artefacts/vm/search/?oid=180869&museumsnr=T16054&f=html

Unimus (2020b). T8257. In: Unimus [online]. [2020-06-09]. Dostupné z:
http://www.unimus.no/artefacts/vm/search/?oid=8897&museumsnr=T8257&f=html

Unimus (2020c). S12274. In: Unimus [online]. [2020-06-09]. Dostupné z: http://www.unimus.no/artefacts/am/search/?oid=34514&museumsnr=S12274&f=html

Unimus (2020d). S5460. In: Unimus [online]. [2020-06-09]. Dostupné z:
http://www.unimus.no/artefacts/am/search/?oid=19688&museumsnr=S5460&f=html

Unimus (2020e). T20736. In: Unimus [online]. [2020-06-09]. Dostupné z:
http://www.unimus.no/artefacts/vm/search/?oid=37376&museumsnr=T20736&f=html

The Rebec from Haithabu

Among the wooden fragments from Haithabu, three pieces of musical instruments were found (Lawson 1984: 151–159; Westphal 2006: 83–84). These instruments, together with the bone flutes from Haithabu (Brade 1978), cast light on the music practiced in the town and in Scandinavia in general. In this article, we will describe one of the wooden instruments – a fragment, which is considered to be the oldest hard evidence of bowed string instruments of the European Middle Ages.

music-haithabu
Three types of musical instruments found in Haithabu.
Taken from Brade 1978: 28 and Schietzel 2014: 289

The fragment, bearing the inventory number HbS.916.001, was discovered while strengthening a creek dam (Lawson 1984: 151–155; Westphal 2006: 83, Taf. 61: 1). It consists of a one-piece body that is 43 cm long and made of alder wood (Lawson 1984: 151). The preserved fragment represents the rounded bottom of the sound box, which is roughly shaped into a pear or bowl shape. A flat neck is connected to that part. The roughened surface indicates that the product has not been finished, and it is even possible that it was subsequently used for a non-musical purpose, for example as a bowl.

haithabu-hedeby-rebec-fiddleFragment HbS.916.001 and its schematic drawing.
Taken from Westphal 2006: Taf. 61: 1.

gudok
Possible reconstruction of the fragment HbS.916.001.
Taken from Schietzel 2014: 289.

Although the object is only partial, it can be compared with other archaeological finds, pictorial and written material. In the English and German literature, one may find that the Haithabu find is a fiddle (Lawson 1984; Westphal 2006), but the term is not very precise because it refers to a stringed instrument that is later and differently shaped. At the same time, it can be found that the instrument is associated with the Eastern European instrument called gusli (Lawson 1984), but again, gusli is more similar to lyres or psalteries (Povetkin 2001: 235–240). The association with the Eastern European instrument called gudok, proposed by Kurt Schietzel (2014: 289), is closer because it refers to similar instruments made in the same period (Povetkin 2001: 241–243). The oldest specimen, or a fragment thereof, is dated to the middle of the 11th century (Povetkin 1997: 180–184, Tabl. 107: 1). However, the inclusion of Haithabu find in the corpus of Eastern instruments would ignore the relatively extensive number of pictorial and linguistic material that we have available for northwestern Europe. Generally speaking, an instrument of this type is traditionally referred to as a rebec in Europe. This instrument, like the bow, came to the Continent from an Islamic area and was probably domesticated as early as the 10th century (Bachmann 1964; Panum 1971: 341–346). As early as the 11th century, this string instrument appeared in European iconography.

In the Germanic environment, instruments of this kind were given a peculiar designation, which roots in the Proto-Germanic gīgana, which denotes movement. Therefore, we can find a number of string instruments that are based on this root – such as German violin (Geige), Shetland gue or Old Norse gígja. I believe that it is gígja, which is also a nickname used in the 10th century in Iceland (Jónsson 1908: 247), that best describes the relevant musical instrument from Haithabu. It should be added that the Old Norse dictionary also knows the terms gígjari (gígja-player) and draga gígju (literally “dragging the gígja”, to play gígja with a bow) (Baetke 2006: 196). The Haithabu fragment can be dated to the 10th or 11th century, making it the oldest archaeological evidence of bowed string instruments in Europe.

novgorod-gudok-fiddleGudok instruments from Novgorod, 11th–14th century.
Taken from Povetkin 1997: Tabl. 107: 1–5.

rebec-early-medievalRebec instruments depicted in Anglo-Saxon and French iconography, 11th–12th century.
1. St John’s College, Cambridge (MS B 18 f. 1), 12th century.
2. Bodleian Library, Oxford (MS Bodley 352 f. 6), 11th century.
3. University Library, Glasgow (MS Hunter 229 f. 21), 12th century.
4. Portal of St Mary’s Cathedral in Oloron-Sainte-Marie, 12th century.
5. British Library, London (MS Cotton Tiberius C VI f. 30), 11th century.

The top board of the instrument from Haithabu is not preserved. Although it can be assumed that it was made of wood, it is not certain how it could have been attached to the body. From comparative sources it can be concluded that these instruments could be two to four-stringed, but usually three-stringed. The strings could be made of intestines or horsehair, which could also be stretched on a bow. The tunning pegs and bridge can be assumed to be made of wood or bone / antler (Lawson 1984: 155). Iconography shows that the players used their right hands to drag the bow and their left hands to determine the pitch; the instrument rested either on the neck under the chin or on the knees. Kurt Schietzel (2014: 289) suggests the possibility of holding an instrument in arms, although this method – as far as I know – cannot be based on any source.

Bowed string instruments in iconography of 11th-12th century and possible reconstruction.
1. Universitätsbibliothek Leipzig (unknown manuscript), 11th century, Panum 1971: Fig. 276.
2. St John’s College, Cambridge (MS B 18 f. 1), 12th century.
3. British Library, London (MS Cotton Tiberius C VI f. 30), 11th century.
4. Church carving, church in Gamtofte, Fyn, 12th century, Panum 1971: Fig. 278.
5–6. University Library, Glasgow (MS Hunter 229 f. 21), 12th century.
7. Bibliothèque du Grand Séminaire de Strasbourg (Ms 37 f. 36), 12th century.
8. St Augustine’s Abbey, Canterbury (BL Arundel MS 91 f. 218v), 12th century.
9. Suggested reconstruction, Schietzel 2014: 289.

Bibliography

Bachmann, Werner (1964). Die Anfänge des Streichinstrumentenspiels, Leipzig.

Baetke, Walter (2006). Wörterbuch zur altnordischen Prosaliteratur [digitální verze], Greifswald.

Brade, Christine (1978). Knöcherne Kernspaltflöten aus Haithabu. In: Berichte über die Ausgrabungen in Haithabu 12, Neumünster: 24–35.

Jónsson, Finnur (1908). Tilnavne i den islandske oldlitteratur. In: Aarbøger for Nordisk Oldkyndighed og Historie 1907, Kjøbenhavn: 161–381.

Lawson, Graeme H. (1984), Zwei Saiteninstrumente aus Haithabu. In: Berichte über die Ausgrabungen in Haithabu 19, Neumünster: 151–159.

Panum, Hortense (1971). The Stringed Instruments of the Middle Ages, London.

Povetkin, Vladimir I. (2001). „Lärmgefäße des Satans“. Musikinstrumente im mittelalterlichen Novgorod. In: Müller-Wille, Michael (Hrsg.). Novgorod. Das mittelalterliche Zentrum und sein Umland im Norden Rußlands, Neumünster: 225–244.

Povetkin 1997 = Поветкин, В.И. (1997). Музыкальные инструменты // Археология. Древняя Русь. Быт и культура / Ответст. редакторы тома Б.А.Колчин, Т.И.Макарова. М .: Наука. Глава 11. С. 179–185

Westphal, Florian. (2006), Die Holzfunde von Haithabu. Die Ausgrabungen in Haithabu 11, Neumünster.

Schietzel, Kurt (2014). Spurensuche Haithabu, Neumünster – Hamburg.

Zdobené hroty zo Svébmi obývaného priestoru Čiech, Moravy a Slovenska

Je mi velkou ctí publikovat příspěvek “Zdobené hroty zo Svébmi obývaného priestoru Čiech, Moravy a Slovenska“, sepsaný fanouškem projektu Dušanem Kováčem. Příspěvek mapuje germánské nálezy zdobených hrotů kopí z našeho území, které lze zařadit do 2.-3. století našeho letopočtu.


Pevně věřím, že si čtení tohoto článku užijete. Pokud máte poznámku nebo dotaz, neváhejte mi napsat nebo se ozvat níže v komentářích. Pokud se Vám líbí obsah těchto stránek a chtěli byste podpořit jejich další fungování, podpořte, prosím, náš projekt na Patreonu nebo Paypalu