Petersen type M sword

Many Viking Age sword are richly decorated, which makes quality reconstruction very expensive. That is why I was asked by my colleagues to provide an overview of undecorated swords that would be more affordable to reconstruct. I chose Petersen’s type M for its simplicity and major representation among Scandinavian sword finds. Because this type is often overlooked these days, it certainly deserves our attention.


Description

The type M (also known as R. 489) describes a sword variant standing between types F and Q. It is characterised by a simple hilt in the shape of the letter I. Sharply cut cross-guard and upper guard are usually straight and of similar height. From the front view, both the upper and cross-guard are of rectangle shape, with the cross-guard slightly bent in rare cases. The upper guard is of simple shape similar to cross-guard, and the tang is held in place by hammering it into a rivet shape; the upper guard is never ended by a pommel. Sides of the guards are usually straight, less often rounded. An important feature of type M swords is undecorated hilt. Blades are usually double-edged (single-edged variants make up to 15% of finds according to Petersen) and simple, although we also know of some Norse and Swedish blades made of patern welded steel (Androščuk 2014: 386–7; Petersen 1919: 118). Petersen notes that none of Norse blades carries an inscription, which according to our information is still actual. That said, there is a variant of ULFBERHT inscription on a blade from Eura, Finland (Kazakevičius 1996: 39). While the swords are of simple design, they are made of quality materials.

typM-framdalir
Type M sword from area of Framdalir, Iceland.
Source: Androščuk 2014: 68, Fig. 23.

Type M swords are in general up to one meter long, usually between 80 and 90 cm. The longest sword that we know of is 95 cm long. An average width of Scandinavian blades is 5,5-6 cm, sometimes up to 6,5 cm. Measured swords of average length weigh 1100-1200 grams. The shortest piece we are aware of weighs 409 grams and is 47,7 cm long, with blade having 38,5 cm in length and 0,48 cm in thickness (Peirce 2002: 86). This sword, said to had been found in a boy’s grave, seems to be a miniaturised, yet fully functional version. In order to outline anatomy of this interesting type, we chose six relatively well-preserved swords that we will describe in more detail.

C59045_DovreDovre, Norway (C59045). Well-preserved sword found in a grave in 2013. Total length of 89 cm, blade length is 77 cm and 5,9 cm wide. Fuller is visible 12 cm from cross-guard up to 6 cm from blade point. Length of the hilt is 12 cm, with grip being 9,3 cm long and 3,4 cm wide. Cross-guard’s length, height and width are 9,4 × 1,1 × 2,3 cm. Upper guard has the measurements 7 × 1,3 × 2,2-2,3 cm. Total weight 1141,1 g. Photo source: Vegard Vike, Museum of cultural history, Oslo.

C58919_FlesbergÅsland, Norway (C58919). A preserved sword placed in a grave, found in 2013. Total length 87 cm. Length of grip 8,5 cm. Length, height and thickness of cross-guard is 11,6 × 1,2 × 2,6 cm. Length, height and width of upper guard is 8,1 × 1,2 × 2,7 cm. Photo source: Elin Christine Storbekk, Museum of cultural history, Oslo.

C24244_ArgehovdMogen, Norway (C24244). Well-preserved sword found in a grave before 1937. Total length 85 cm, blade width 5,5 cm. Grip length 9,6 cm. Length of cross-guard 12,9 cm, length of upper guard 8,3 cm. Photo source: Peirce 2002: 86, Museum of cultural history, Oslo.

C53462_TelemarkTelemark, Norway (C53462). Partially corroded sword donated to museum in 2004. Total length 71 cm, damaged blade is 59,5 cm long and 5,8 cm wide. Length of grip 9,7 cm. Length and height of cross-guard is 10,5 × 1 cm, length and width of upper guard 6,8 × 0,8 cm. Photo source: Ellen C. Holte, Museum of cultural history, Oslo.

parisUnknown French location, possibly found in a river (Musée de l’Armée, Paris; J3). Very well-preserved sword found before 1890. Total length 90 cm. Blade is 75 cm long and 5,3 cm wide. Length of cross-guard 10 cm. Length of grip 12 cm. Photo source: Peirce 2002: 86, Musée de l’Armée negativ K23710.

T19391-rorosRøros, Norway (T19391). Well-preserved sword found in 1973. Total length 90 cm, blade is 78 cm long and 5,5 cm wide. Length, height and width of cross-guard 12,2 × 1,3 × 2,3 cm. Measurements of upper guard are 8,1 × 1,3 × 2,1 cm. Photo source: Ole Bjørn Pedersen, Museum of cultural history, Oslo.

We should also pay an attention to organic remnants found on type M swords. In general, we could say that many swords show traces of wooden panelling of the grip and wooden scabbard. Let’s examine several specific examples. The sword find from grave 511 in Repton, England was stored in wooden scabbard, that was inlaid with sheep’s fleece and covered in leather (Biddle – Kjølbye-Biddle 1992: 49). The scabbard was held by a hanging system, of which only a single cast buckle survived. The handle was made of softwood, which was then wrapped with a cloth strip. The sword from Öndverðarnes, Iceland (Kt 47) had a wooden grip wrapped in thin, plaited cord, and a wooden scabbard covered in textile (Eldjárn 2000: 326). Traces of leather cover were found at the tip of the scabbard, with remnants of sword belt slider located 3 cm below the cross-guard. In another Icelandic grave from Sílastaðir (Kt 98) – was found a sword with grip of wooden panels that were retracted below the cross-guard and wrapped with a cord at the upper guard (Eldjárn 2000: 326). This sword’s scabbard is wooden, inlaid with textile and covered in linen and leather; there are still several spots with visible profiled wrappings. There was a metal strip placed 12 cm below cross-guard, most likely used for sword belt attachment. The scabbard had a leather chape at the tip.

Organic components are also often present at type M swords from Norway. One of the Kaupang swords had a wooden grip wrapped with a leather cord or strap, and a wooden scabbard covered in leather (Blindheim – Heyerdahl-Larsen 1995: 61). Fragments of wooden grips and scabbards were simultaneously found with swords from Brekke (B10670), Hogstad (C52343), Kolstad (T12963), Støren (Androščuk 2014: 76, Pl. 111) and Åsland (C58919). The sword from Nedre Øksnavad (S12274) had a wooden grip and scabbard covered in textile. The sword from Eikrem (T12199), which is most likely of type M, had a scabbard made of spruce with parts held together by metal clamps and covered in leather and textile. The sword from Soggebakke (T16395) had a wooden scabbard. Swords from Hallem søndre (T13555), Havstein (T15297) and Holtan (T16280) had fragments of wooden grips. This is only a limited inventory that I was able to list during my short research. Yet it is an immensely valuable source that provides us with a decent idea of what the typical type M sword looked like.


typM-ondverdarnestypM-kaupang

Swords from Öndverðarnes, Iceland and Kaupang, Norway.
Source: Blindheim – Heyerdahl-Larsen 1995: Pl. 48; Eldjárn 2000: 326, 161. mynd.


 

Distribution and dating

When it comes to distribution of the swords, it seems that type M was mainly a Norwegian domain. In 1919, Petersen noted that that there are at least 198 type M swords known in Norway, of which at least 30 were single-edged (Petersen 1919: 117–121). Nonetheless, in the past 100 years, an immeasurable amount of new swords were excavated, and the number increases every year – such as in Vestfold, which is absent in Petersen’s list, we already have 42 finds (Blindheim et al. 1999: 81). Highest concentration of type M swords is in Eastern Norway and Sogn, where we know of at least 375 swords according to Per Hernæs (1985). Mikael Jakobsson (1992: 210) registers 409 swords in Norway. And current number will undoubtedly be even greater. We will most likely not be far from truth while claiming that type M is together with type H/I one of the most widespread Norwegian swords. The number of sword finds in neighbouring areas is disproportionate. From Sweden, we only know of 10 swords (Androščuk 2014: 69), at least 4 from Iceland (Eldjárn 2000: 330), at least 4 from Great Britain (Biddle – Kjølbye-Biddle 1992: 49; Bjørn – Shetelig 1940: 18, 26), 4 from France (Jakobsson 1992: 211), 2 from Denmark (Pedersen 2014: 80), 3 from Finland, 1 from Ireland and 1 from Germany (Jakobsson 1992: 211; Kazakevičius 1996: 39). Vytautas Kazakevičius (1996: 39) registers at least 9 type M swords from Baltic, at least 2 from Poland and 2 from Czech Republic. Jiří Košta, the Czech sword expert, denies there is a single type M sword find from Czech Republic and according to him, claiming so is but a myth often cited in literature (personal discussion with Jiří Košta). Baltic swords are rather specific – they are shorter and with a narrower single-edged blade, features causing them being interpreted as local product. It is safe to say we know of over 440 pieces, though the real count being much higher.

When it comes to dating the finds, Petersen argues that first type M swords appear in Norway around the half of 9th century and prevail until the beginning of 10th century (Petersen 1919: 121). Recent archaeological finds from Eastern Norway, Kaupang especially, show that they were being placed in graves during first half of 10th century (Blindheim et al. 1999: 81). Two Swedish datable pieces come from the 10th century (Androščuk 2014: 69), which is also the case of two swords from Iceland (Eldjárn 2000: 330). Polish finds can be dated to 9th century (Kazakevičius 1996: 39). Type M swords are thus widely present from both geographical and chronological perspective, and one can only argue if the similarity is just a rather randomness caused by simple design.

typM
Type M sword distribution in Eastern Norway and Sogn.
Source: Blindheim et al. 1999: 81, Fig. 9, according to Hernæs 1985.


Intepretation

Generally speaking, a sword is a clear symbol of elite status and power. It is evident that Old Norse people, like people anywhere else, tended to compare to one another, be it in skills or wealth. This often resulted in quite a heated dialogue, in which men attempted to triumph in greatness of their qualities (so called mannjafnaðr). Swords undoubtedly played a role of wealth and status symbols in such situations. Looking from a broader perspective, one can find the answer in Norway that was multipolar in 9th and 10th century – ruling families were attempting centralisation, which resulted in creation of society with a strong feel for expressing its independence or importance through adopting the elitism model of sword ownership and its placing in graves. This led to Norway providing us with immense amount of sword finds, which is unprecedented. Social tensions affected everyone to a point, but only a few had the wealth to invest large in exclusive weaponry. “Simpler”, yet fully functional type M swords can be perceived as cheaper alternative that provided free men of lesser wealth with ability to improve reputation and identity of their families in times with no clear social stratification. This is supported by their look and amount present in both male and female graves (Kjølen, C22541).

„Simple iron parts without any precious metal decoration make up the hilt of the sword. It is a pragmatic sword, probably worn with pride, but not by the highest strata of society. Such simple and unpretentious swords seem to be the norm in mountain graves, and they were probably made or at least hilted in Norway.“ (Vike 2017)

 

Type M swords seem to be utility weapons that could had played a representative role to their owners. Two rare Norse swords – a sword from Strande (T1951) and sword from Lesja (C60900) – suggest that they were handed down for at least 50 years and were modified to match the latest fashion. This approach is also the case of other Viking Age swords (Fedrigo et al. 2017: 425). The swords from Strande has type E pommel, which was additionally attached to tang along with typologically younger cross-guard of type M (Petersen 1919: 78, Fig. 66). The sword from Lesja consists of blade with tang, to which a cross-guard of older sword style (type C) was attached together with type M upper guard (Vike 2017). It is also important to add that the sword from Lesja was found on an iceberg, where it most likely served a reindeer hunter 1000 years ago.

Lesja, Norway (C60900). Very well-preserved sword found in 2017 on an iceberg. Type C cross-guard with type M upper guard. Total length 92,8 cm, length and width of blade 79,4 × 6,2 cm. Thickness of blade 0,45 cm. Length of hilt 13,4 cm, grip is 10,1 cm long. Cross-guard measures 7,5 × 1,7 cm. Total weight 1203 g. Photo source: Vegard Vike, Museum of cultural history, Oslo.


Bibliography

Androščuk, Fedir (2014). Viking Swords : Swords and Social aspects of Weaponry in Viking Age Societies, Stockholm.

Biddle, Martin – Kjølbye-Biddle, Birthe (1992). Repton and the Vikings. In: Antiquity, Vol. 66, 38–51.

Bjørn, Anathon – Shetelig, Haakon (1940). Viking Antiquities in Great Britain and Ireland, Part 4 : Viking Antiquities in England, Bergen.

Blindheim, Charlotte – Heyerdahl-Larsen, Birgit (1995). Kaupang-funnene, Bind II. Gravplassene i Bikjholbergene/Lamøya. Undersøkelsene 1950–1957. Del A. Gravskikk, Oslo.

Blindheim, Ch. – Heyerdahl-Larsen, B. – Ingstad, Anne S. (1999). Kaupang-funnene. Bind II. Gravplassene i Bikjholbergene/Lamøya: Undersøkelsene 1950–57. Del B. Oldsaksformer. Del C. Tekstilene, Oslo.

Fedrigo, Anna et al. (2017). Extraction of archaeological information from metallic artefacts—A neutron diffraction study on Viking swords. In: Journal of Archaeological Science: Reports, 12, 425–436.

Hernæs, Per (1985). De østnorske sverdfunn fra yngre jernalder : en geografisk analyse. Magistergradsavhandling i nordisk arkeologi – Universitetet i Oslo, Oslo.

Jakobsson, Mikael (1992). Krigarideologi och vikingatida svärdstypologi, Stockholm : Stockholms Universitet.

Kazakevičius, Vytautas (1996). IX–XIII a. baltų kalavijai, Vilnius.

Pedersen, Anne (2014). Dead Warriors in Living Memory. A study of weapon and equestrian burials in Viking-age Denmark, AD 800-1000, Publications from the National Museum. Studies in Archaeology & History Vol. 20:1 1. (Text), Copenhagen.

Peirce, I. G. (2002). Catalogue of Examples. In: Oakeshott E. – Peirce, I. G. (eds). Swords of the Viking Age, Woodbridge, 25–144.

Petersen, Jan (1919). De Norske Vikingesverd: En Typologisk-Kronologisk Studie Over Vikingetidens Vaaben. Kristiania.

Vike, Vegard (2017). A Viking sword from Lesja. UiO Museum of Cultural History, Oslo.
https://www.khm.uio.no/english/research/collections/objects/15/sword_lesja.html

Origins of the “St. Wenceslas Helmet”


In December 2016, an extraordinary sword of Petersen’s type S, known for its rich decoration, was found in Lázně Toušeň in Central Bohemia. Although swords of the type were found in locations ranging from Ireland to Russia, this specific piece is the very first example from the Czech Republic. Thanks to my cooperation with Jiří Košta and Jiří Hošek on mapping the analogies, I had the opportunity to examine the weapon by myself. This and other events of the past two years affected me greatly and made me rethink my approach to many topics. Foremost I felt the need to once again review the so-called St. Wenceslas helmet, the nose-guard and browband in particular.

The helmet known as “St. Wenceslas helmet” is very well known and curious item, which has been kept in Bohemia from the Early Middle Ages, with many publications covering the topic (most notably by Hejdová 1964Merhautová 1992Schránil 1934). Along with a chainmail, a mail cloak and other items, it is a part of the crown jewels, playing its symbolic role in the past millennium. The recent research confirmed that the oldest of these artefacts originated in the 10th century (Bernart – Bravermanová – Ledvina 2014). Nowadays, the helmet consists of a dome, a nose-guard and browband, showing many, often low-quality repairs, which suggest the helmet undergone a complicated development. It is obvious that in its current form, the helmet is a compilation was meant for occasional exhibits and was never meant to be used on the actual head. Let’s thoroughly summarise what facts we have about the helmet, and what is just an assumption.

svatovaclavkaCondition of the St. Wenceslas helmet in 1934. Click for higher resolution.
Source: Schránil 1934: Tab. XIII and XIV.

On the helmet’s base, the measurements of the inner oval are 24,4 cm × 20,9 cm, with a circumference of 70 cm. The single-piece conical dome might have been crafted in Czech lands, and due to being dated in 10th century, it could have been around during St. Wenceslas’s reign (†935) (Bernart – Bravermanová – Ledvina 2014: 179). It is thus possibly one of the oldest preserved single-piece conical helmets, of which the closest parallels can be found in the Czech Republic and Poland (Bernart 2010). The helmet dome has height of 16 cm, with the helmet weighing a total of 1 kilogram. A presumption that the helmet dome was of younger date was not confirmed. The material of the helmet is substantially inhomogenous – on the forehead, the thickness is between 1,6 and 1,9 mm, while being 0,6 to 1,9 mm on the sides (personal discussion with Miloš Bernart). In the place where the nose-guard is attached today, there was originally an integral nose-guard that was later cut off and the area surrounding it was adjusted by hammering to fit the now-present part. Hejdová suggested that the original helmet had ear and neck protection prior to the adjustment, leaving holes around the edge (Hejdová 196619671968), but a recent analysis considers these to be a remnant after helmet padding (Bernart – Bravermanová – Ledvina 2014). These two aspects should not be viewed as separated – as is suggested in case of Lednica helmet, the helmet padding could be the base of the ear and neck protection that was attached to it (Sankiewicz – Wyrwa 2018: 217-219). The dome bears signs of several repairs, which had though avoided a rather specific hole on the helmet rear most likely either caused by a weapon blow or was meant to suggest so. Further details on measurements and repairs are summarised by Hejdová and Schránil (Hejdová 1964; Schránil 1934).

jednokusSelection of single-piece helmets from the Czech Republic and Poland.
Source: Bernart 2010.

Some time following the death of St. Wenceslas, but possibly still in 10th century, the helmet received various modifications linked to its exaltation to a sacred relic. The adjustments were possibly initiated either by Duke Boleslav II. (†999), who supported the cult of St. Wenceslas, or his wife, the duchess Emma (Bernart – Bravermanová – Ledvina 2014: 181). The existence of the modified helmet was possibly reflected by author of the so-called “Legend of Kristián”, dated 992-994 AD. The legend speaks of Duke Wenceslas meeting Duke Radslav of Kouřim, who laid down his weapon after seeing a mark of the Holy Cross shining on Wenceslas’s forehead. It is possible that Kristián, being a potential brother of Boleslav II. and therefore well aware of the Přemyslid dynasty affairs at the end of 10th century, meant the shining cross as a reference to the decorated nose-guard, a newly installed decoration on the helmet. According to Merhautová, the helmet could had been unveiled at the occasion of founding the Archdiocese of Prague in 973 AD (Merhautová 2000: 91).

One of lesser modifications done during the 10th century affected the lower edge of helmet dome, where an aventail holder made of folded silver strip was riveted. Today, only fragments of the strip holder on inner and outer edge remain. This type of holder represents a very laborious and highly effective protection; there are grooves cut or sheared into the fold of the strip, to which rings holding the aventail are inserted, held in place by a metal wire. This sophisticated method is known from at least ten other Early Middle Ages helmets and helmet fragments, where the strip is made from iron, brass or gilded bronze (Vlasatý 2015). The St. Wenceslas treasure guarded in Prague also contains a chainmail. It is accompanied by a square-shaped mail cloak, which upper part (a sort of “standing collar” with dimensions 50 × 7,5 cm) is fringed with three lines of almost pure gold rings (Schránil 1934). The uppermost line of rings is again made of iron. A detailed analysis confirmed that the collar is made of identical rings as the chainmail but differs from the rest of the mail cloak. The researchers (Bernart – Bravermanová – Ledvina 2014: 180181) suggest the collar was originally a standing collar of the chainmail, only later to be removed and re-used as an aventail attached to the helmet with iron rings. The aventail was possibly removed from the helmet during reign of Charles IV and became a basis for the mail cloak, later to be expanded to the current shape. Because of the original length of 7,5 cm and use of a silver holder, it seems this part of the helmet was purely decorative.

vaclav-limecDetail of the collar with golden fringe. Source: Bernart 2010: pic. 37.

Another modification, possibly done simultaneously with the previously mentioned improvements, was an installation of the nose-guard and the browband. We shall take a deeper look at this particular change as the nose-guard has been greatly discussed by many Czech researchers, and as I will attempt to show, many of the opinions were completely misleading and based on ignorance of wider context. The nose-guard is cross-shaped with a total height of 14,7 cm, width of 18,5 cm and is thick up to 5 mm. On three of its ends, it is attached to the dome by large iron rivets. The brow part is lobated on the upper edge and represents eye-brows. The nasal itself copies the shape of a nose and is 6,3 cm long and 3,3 cm wide. From the side view, the nasal seems to be slightly bent, which Miloš Bernart claims to be caused by falling on its lower end. There is a small thorn of unknown function coming out of the middle of the lower end of the nose-guard. Due to typological similarity with a helmets from Olomouc and Lednica, we could argue the thorn was expanded to a small hook used for attaching face-protecting aventail (Sankiewicz – Wyrwa 2018: 217-219). Nearest analogy of the cross-shaped nose-guard is known from Bosnian Trnčina, which is dated to 10th-11th century (D’Amato 2015: 67, Pl. 5) and is a second specimen of single-piece helmet with additional nose-guard. Lower part of St. Wenceslas helmet’s dome is edged with a decorative brow band covering the silver aventail holder, ending beneath the nose-guard. It was attached to the helmet by rivets, together with two larger rivets on the nose-guard; the rivets fastening the band were secured by copper pads on the inner side of the helmet. Circa three-quarters of this brow band survived to present day, which got probably damaged in the past to a point where it had to be repaired by additional attachments. Decorative band on a helmet is an uncommon feature, known mostly from Eastern Europe (Holmquist Olausson – Petrovski 2007: 234-236). The nearest analogy of the band is possibly a decoration of helmet from Nemia, Ukraine, dated to 11th century (Kirpičnikov 1971: Tabl. IX).

Schematic reconstruction of the helmet circa 1000 AD.
Source: Taken from Czech Radio website.

The silver surface of both the nose-guard and browband is decorated by overlay. This method is based on cutting into the base material in various directions, to which a more expensive metal is then hammered (Fuglesang 1980: 125–126; Moilanen 2015: 276–277). In the case of the nose-guard, the base metal is cut in three directions; this fact is apparent on X-ray photos, on some spots even with naked eye. The browband is most likely decorated the same way. Silver wire or plate was used for overlay, and analysis also shows traces of copper, gold, lead and corroded zinc, though not used for decoration (personal discussion with Miloš Bernart). According to Vegard Vike, the material used for decoration was silver wire mechanically hammered to the cuts, while a copper-alloy wire might had been used for outlines which are now missing. Miloš Bernart, Petr Floriánek and Jeff Pringle agree that the outlines were originally filled with niello, which fell out over time. The nearest analogical helmets with masks decorated by overlay are from Lokrume, Gotland, and Kiev, Ukraine (Vlasatý 2016Vlasatý 2018). Furthermore, a fragment from Lokrume is decorated by identical motifs as the St. Wenceslas helmet’s browband. Overlay decoration is also commonly used on weapons and riding equipment from 950 AD to beginning of 12th century in England and Scandinavia, from where this method could had expanded to neighbour countries together with motifs achieved by this method. Like in the case of the sword find from Lázně Toušeň, it is extremely difficult to determine the point of origin, because spread of fashion also included manufacturing processes, not only the final product. Overlay method thus only indicates that the item most likely originated in Northern or Eastern Europe.

Wenceslas_noseguard-ChristDetail of the St. Wenceslas helmet’s nose-guard. Source: Vegard Vike.

I believe that motifs achieved by this method on the nose-guard can help us narrow down the place of manufacturing. To displeasure of all Czech researchers who would love to deem the character depicted on the nose-guard as Norse god Oðinn (eg. Merhautová 1992Merhautová 2000Sommer 2001: 32), it is necessary to reject this theory once and for all. In fact, it is an early depiction of crucified Jesus Christ (as was suggested by Benda, Hejdová and Schránil), that has many parallels in European area up to 12th century (Fuglesang 1981Staecker 1999). Its function on the nose-guard is clear – to represent a Christian owner, depicts a formula of Christ’s redemption and his second coming, to induce fear and awe in the enemy. If Merhautová (2000: 91) writes that „cruficied Christ neither was, nor as a winner over death could not be depicted hairless, with shouting mouth and untreated moustache (…)“, it is only a proof of ignoring archaeological material, which we need to present on the example of finds of crosses, wood carvings and militaria.

jellingEarly Scandinavian depictions of Christ. Click for higher resolution.
A stone from Jelling, cast figure from Haithabu, wooden figure from Jelling mound, pendant from Birka grave Bj 660.

krizkyDepiction of Christ from Northern and Western Europe. 9th-12th century. Click for higher resolution.
Source: Staecker 1999: Abb. 59, 61, 68, 79; Kat. Nr. 14, 43, 46, 49, 51a, 53a, 54, 60, 65, 74, 81, 86, 100, 116a.

jezis_meceFigures on sword pommels interpreted as Jesus, 11th century.
Swords from Pada, Estonia and Ålu, Norway. Source: Ebert 1914: 121 and Unimus.no catalogue.

Let us take a closer look at separate parts of the nose-guard’s decoration. Most attention was paid to head of the figure which – although not being entirely preserved – has two staring eyes, open mouth with bared teeth, untreated moustache forked in many directions and a crown of unspecifiable shape. Such features were in the past perceived as a reason why this character can not be considered crucified Jesus Christ. All of them can be though found on early Christian art of Western, Central, Northern and Eastern Europe in 9th-12th century. The closest similarity can be seen on the face of Crucified on a cross found in Stora Uppakrå, Sweden (11th century; Staecker 1999: Kat. Nr. 51). Also from 11th century, a sword found in Ålu, Norway (C36640) has pommel depicting Christ with bared teeth, moustache, stare and tri-tipped crown on head (discussion with Vegard Vike). If we attempted to specify shape of the crown, we can then point out to analogies, in which crosses, rhombuses with cross motif, Hand of God, halos or hats are depicted above head of the Crucified, with the rhombus and Hand of God seem to be the closest. Depicted features belong to angry God, which one should be afraid of – this is common for era up to 1000 AD, when Christian Europe was under constant attacks. In newly Christianised lands, Jesus Christ was just one god of the local pantheon at first (Bednaříková 2009: 94), and had to achieve his preference by force, not by gestures of friendship and humility.

hlavaHeads of the Crucified in European art, 9th-12th century.
Click for higher resolution. Source: Staecker 1999.

Also, arms wound with two pair of bracelets similar with rings were in the past considered a reason why a figure cannot be considered crucified Jesus Christ. But the period iconography is in direct contradiction – on the contrary, it seems that early depictions of Jesus Christ often show Jesus bound, not only nailed to cross (Fuglesang 1981). The rings therefore represent loops binding arms, or pleated sleeve of tunic that the figure is wearing. Position of thumbs pointing upwards is then a feature undoubtedly pointing to Jesus on cross. An X-ray screening and detailed photos also seem to show a stigma or nails. Arms appear to be broken, to which we also find analogies on a crucifix from Hungarian Peceszentmárton (12th century; Jakab 2006).

rukaHands of the Cruficied in European and Turkish art, 9th-12th century.
Click for higher resolution. Source: Staecker 1999 and the Jelling stone.

Body of the figure seems to be dressed in a tunic or coat, which is tied in the waistline area with a massive belt or rope. The coat is also decorated with opposite lines creating a herringbone motif. It is also possible to find many parallels to these details in period iconography, with a bound belt being widely used in Scandinavian art. As for the legs, their decoration is mostly fallen out, which makes any reconstruction near to impossible; it is though obvious that the figure stands with legs apart, which is an uncommon feature.

hrud-pasBody of the Crucified in European art, 9th-12th century.
Click for higher resolution. Source: Staecker 1999 and Jelling finds.

Above the crown of the crucified character, there is a non-completely preserved plaited ornament, filling the area where the nose-guard narrows. This motif closely resembles a filling plait found on hilts of Petersen type L, R, S and T swords (Petersen 1919) and on spear sockets (eg. Fuglesang 1980). The plaits on the swords originating in 2nd half of 10th century are the nearest analogy, while the spear decorations evolving into more complicated forms categorised as Ringerike style can be dated between the end of 10th century and third quarter of 11th century (Fuglesang 1980: 18; Wilson – Klindt-Jensen 1966: 146).

strelka Plaited ornament on Scandinavian and Estonian weapons, 10th-11th century.
Source: Jets 2012: Fig. 1 and Unimus.no catalogue.

Above the arms and next to them are simple tri-tipped ornaments and intertwined loops. Their position on the nose-guard is symmetrical. It seems that this decoration was meant to fill in empty space that would otherwise remain there. As an analogy to tri-tipped decoration, one can mention triquetras on Jelling stone, located above arms and next to face of the Crucified. But there are more parallels: tri-tipped ornaments can also be found above arms of figure depicted on pommel of Pada sword and on Ålu sword pommel where there are two crosses next to a face of the character. Loops depicted between hands and large rivets have an analogy in a loop on sword guard from Telšiai, Latvia (Tomsons 2008: 94, 5. att), in wavy lines located beneath arms of the Cruficied on cross from Gullunge, Sweden (turn of 12th century) and Finnish Halikko (12th century). In the case of Halikko cross, the wavy lines possibly represent clouds or wind currents, as the area above the head is also filled with heavenly bodies (Moon and Sun). The whole composition might therefore depict Jesus as the lord of heavens. Some crosses in Byzantium tradition depict winged angels next to hands of the Crucified. In other cases, the area below arms is filled with text or heads of figures, and so one cannot rule out that the ornament might have a similar apotropaic meaning.

vlnovka A simple ornament: St. Wenceslas helmet, Gullunge, Halikko.
Source: Staecker 1999: Kat. Nr. 112, Abb. 96.

We can evaluate the decoration on helmet’s browband as a typical plaited ornament of Borre style, which has rich analogies in lands under Scandinavian influence – circa from Great Britain to Russia. In Scandinavia, the Borre style is dated between 1st half of 9th century and 2nd half of 10th century. In Poland, the Borre style found a wide use and became favoured and was still used during 11th century (Jaworski et al. 2013: 302). Ornaments of this kind can also be found on Lokrume helmet fragment, on several Petersen type R and type S swords, and we could possibly find it on other militaria as well. Although of different shape, intertwined loops are also present on decorative band on helmet from Nemia, Ukraine.

Emblems_1-5 Plaited ornaments used on Petersen type R and type S swords from Northern, Central and Eastern Europe.
Created by Tomáš Cajthaml.

obrouckaDecorative bands on St. Wenceslas helmet and on helmet from Nemia, Ukraine.
Source: Schránil 1934: Tab. XIII; Kirpičnikov 1971: Tab. IX.

If we were to suggest a place of manufacture of these decorated components, Scandinavia, or rather the island of Gotland definitely is the most probable (Schránil 1934Benda 1972Merhautová 2000Bravermannová 2012Bernart – Bravermanová – Ledvina 2014), although there are more possibilities. Potential candidates can also be Poland, Baltic lands, Finland, Russia or Ukraine, but definitely not Rhineland, as some suggested (Hejdová 1964196619671968). The components could have gotten to Central Europe via the Polish route, which was widely open up to 70s of 10th century thanks to a marriage of Mieszko I of Poland and Czech princess Doubrava, sister of Boleslav II. But we cannot either rule out even a later import, because as proven by Ethelred’s denarii, which were copied in Bohemia and transported back to Baltic sea, the route was also open in 80s and 90s of 10th century as well (Lutovský – Petráň 2004: 95; Petráň 2006: 168).

The St. Wenceslas helmet is a compilation of several, originally unrelated components, which was most likely put together of the initiative of Boleslav II. in order to support the growing cult of St. Wenceslas and therefore his own position. The helmet was modified and repeatedly repaired throughout the ages. Historical and cultural value of this item is incalculable. Currently, the helmet is on exhibition at Prague castle, where it receives a major attention both local and foreign visitors.

St. Wenceslas helmet with shining nose-guard.
Source: Jan Gloc, Prague castle administration.


Bibliography

Bednaříková, Jarmila (2009). Ansgar a problémy misií na evropském severu. In: Křesťanstvo v časoch sv. Vojtěcha, Kraków, 85–103.

Benda, Klement (1972). Svatováclavská přilba ve výtvarném vývoji přemyslovských Čech. In: Umění 20, no. 2, 114–148.

Bernart, Miloš (2010). Raně středověké přílby, zbroje a štíty z Českých zemí, Praha: Univerzita Karlova.

Bernart, Miloš  Bravermanová, Milena  Ledvina, Petr (2014). Arma sancti Venceslai: nová zjištění o přilbě, zbroji a meči zv. Svatováclavské. In: Časopis Společnosti přátel starožitností, Roč. 122, no. 3, 179182.

Bravermanová, Milena (2012). The so-called armour of St. Wenceslaus – a historical introduction. In: Acta Militaria Mediaevalia, VIII, Kraków – Rzeszów – Sanok 2011, 213–220.

D’Amato, Raffaele (2015). Old and new evidence on the East-Roman helmets from the 9th to the 12th centuries. In: Acta Militaria Mediaevalia, tom XI, red. Piotr N. Kotowicz, Kraków – Wrocław – Sanok, 27–157.

Ebert, Max (1914). Zu den Beziehungen der Ostseeprovinzen mit Skandinavien in der ersten Hälfte des 11. Jahrhunderts. In: Baltische Studien zur Archäologie und Geschichte : Arbeiten der Baltischen vorbereitenden Komitees für den XVI. Archäologischen Kongress in Pleskau 1914, Berlin, 117–139.

Fuglesang, Signe Horn (1980). Some Aspects of the Ringerike Style : A phase of 11th century Scandinavian art, Odense.

Fuglesang, Signe Horn (1981). Crucifixion iconography in Viking Scandinavia. In: Hans Bekker-Nielsen – Peter Foote – Olaf Olsen (eds.). Proceedings of the Eighth Viking Congress. Århus 24-31 August 1977, Odense, 73–94.

Hejdová, Dagmar (1964). Přilba zvaná „svatováclavská“.In: Sborník Národního muzea v Praze, A 18, no. 1–2, 1–106.

Hejdová Dagmar (1966). Der sogenannte St.-Wenzels-Helm (1. Teil). In: Waffen und Kostümkunde 8/2, 95–110.

Hejdová Dagmar (1967). Der sogenannte St.-Wenzels-Helm (Fortsetzung). In: Waffen und Kostümkunde 9/1, 28–54.

Hejdová Dagmar (1968). Der sogenannte St.-Wenzels-Helm (Fortsetzung und Schluß). In: Waffen und Kostümkunde 10/1, 15–30.

Holmquist Olausson, Lena – Petrovski, Slavica (2007). Curious birds – two helmet (?) mounts with a christian motif from Birka’s Garrison. In: FRANSSON, Ulf (ed). Cultural interaction between east and west, Stockholm, 231-238.

Jakab, Attila (2006). Bronzkorpuszok a nyíregyházi Jósa András Múzeum gyűjteményében (Bronze crucifixes in the collection of the Jósa András Musem). In: JAMÉ 48, 261–280.

Jaworski, Krzysztof et al. (2013). Artefacts of Scandinavian origin from the Cathedral Island (Ostrow Tumski) in Wroclaw. In: Scandinavian culture in medieval Poland, Wroclaw, 279–314.

Jets, Indrek (2012). Scandinavian late Viking Age art styles as a part of the visual display of warriors in 11th century Estonia. In: Estonian Journal of Archaeology, 2012, 16/2, 118–139.

Kirpičnikov 1971 = Кирпичников А. Н.(1971). Древнерусское оружие: Вып. 3. Доспех, комплекс боевых средств IX—XIII вв., АН СССР, Москва.

Lutovský, Michal – Petráň, Zdeněk (2004). Slavníkovci, Praha.

Moilanen, Mikko (2015). Marks of Fire, Value and Faith : Swords with Ferrous Inlays in Finland During the Late Iron Age (ca. 700–1200 AD), Turku.

Merhautová, Anežka. (1992) Der St. Wenzelshelm. In: Umění 40, no. 3, 169–179.

Merhautová, Anežka (2000). Vznik a význam svatováclavské přilby. In: Přemyslovský stát kolem roku 1000 : na paměť knížete Boleslava II. (+ 7. února 999), Praha, 85–92.

Petersen, Jan (1919). De Norske Vikingesverd: En Typologisk-Kronologisk Studie Over Vikingetidens Vaaben, Kristiania.

Petráň, Zdeněk (2006). České mincovnictví 10. století. In: České země v raném středověku, Praha, 161–174.

Sankiewicz, Paweł – Wyrwa, Andrzej M. (2018). Broń drzewcowa i uzbrojenie ochronne z Ostrowa Lednickiego, Giecza i Grzybowa, Lednica.

Schránil, Josef (1934). O zbroji sv. Václava. In: Svatováclavský sborník na památku 1000. výročí smrti knížete Václava svatého. I – Kníže Václav svatý a jeho doba, Praha, 159172.

Sommer, Petr (2001). Začátky křesťanství v Čechách: kapitoly z dějin raně středověké duchovní kultury, Praha.

Staecker, Jörn (1999). Rex regum et dominus dominorum. Die wikingerzeitlichen Kreuz- und Kruzifixanhänger als Ausdruck der Mission in Altdänemark und Schweden, Stockholm.

Tomsons, Artūrs (2008). Kuršu (T1 tipa) zobeny rokturu ornaments 11. – 13. gs. In: Latvijas Nacionālā Vēstures muzeja raksti, No. 14, 85104.

Vlasatý, Tomáš (2015). Další fragment přilby z Birky. In: Projekt Forlǫg: Reenactment a věda [online]. [quoted 2019-06-05]. Available from: http://sagy.vikingove.cz/dalsi-fragment-prilby-zbirky/

Vlasatý, Tomáš (2016). The helmet from Lokrume, Gotland. In: Projekt Forlǫg: Reenactment a věda [online]. [quoted 2019-06-05]. Available from: http://sagy.vikingove.cz/the-helmet-from-lokrume-gotland/

Vlasatý, Tomáš (2018). Přilba z Kyjeva. In: Projekt Forlǫg: Reenactment a věda [online]. [quoted 2019-06-05]. Available from: http://sagy.vikingove.cz/prilba-z-kyjeva/

Wilson, David M. – Klindt-Jensen, Ole (1966). Viking Art, London.

Kombinační typologie křidélek kopí

Když jsem před pěti lety napsal článek “O křidélkách na vikinských kopích“, netušil jsem, že se k problematice posléze vrátím a pod tíhou evidence své závěry opravím. Otázka křidélek je mezi bojujícími reenactory poměrně často probírána, zatímco odborníky je povšimnuta pouze okrajově. Obecně lze říci, že se jedná o časově i geograficky velmi rozšířený fenomén, který obklopuje řada mystifikací. Tento článek si klade za cíl popsat základní anatomii raně středověkých křidélek kopí a navrhnout jejich kategorizaci.


Jako křidélka nazýváme záměrně vytvořené velkoplošné výstupky připevněné na tulejku kopí, kde mohou plnit několik funkcí. V první řadě představují záštitu, která zvyšuje plochu tulejky a zabraňuje penetraci tulejky do těla zvířete či člověka. Zvýšení plochy tulejky bylo v raném středověku docíleno i dalšími způsoby, například instalací kuličky, kříže, řady nýtků či figurek zvířat. Křidélka jsou však tvarována i pro plnění dalších funkcí bojového charakteru – hákování, odklonu zbraní, krytům a podobně. Některá křidélka jsou zašpičatělá, a je možné jich tedy využít k prodloužení útočné části kopí při seku, anebo o ně mohly být výjimečně opřeny navazované čepelky, které přiléhaly k ostří hrotu a prodlužovaly tak útočnou plochu, jak tomu je u vídeňského Svatého kopí (Paulsen 1969). Křidélka jistě byla využita také ke snadnějšímu fixování pouzder. Jedná se zkrátka o praktický doplněk, který zvyšuje efektivitu zbraně a který použitím získal i symbolickou rovinu (Hjardar – Vike 2011: 177). Obvykle se kopí s křidélky dávají do souvislosti s lovem, k čemuž byla kopí tohoto typu určitě využívána od doby římské až do novověku (Fuglesang 1980: 136-140; Oehrl 2013: Příloha), nicméně je nepochybné, že přinejmenším v raném středověku našla uplatnění také ve válečných střetech, jak ukazuje četná ikonografie z tohoto období.

Viking spear sockets shapes
Raně středověké způsoby zvětšení plochy tulejky kopí : křidélka, kulička, kříž, řada nýtků a figurky zvířat.
Grafika: Tomáš Cajthaml.

V tomto článku nás budou zajímat pouze křidélka, která jsou integrální součástí tulejky. Pomineme dřevěná křidélka, která mohla být navazována na ratiště, jako tomu bylo v období pozdního středověku a raného novověku. Materiálem křidélek byly v drtivé většině železné, raritně také neželezné kovy, zpravidla slitiny mědi. Křidélka z železných kovů jsou takřka vždy navařena, neželezná křidélka mohla být odlita spolu s tulejkou.

Archeologický materiál vykazuje v oblasti křidélek velkou škálu možností, která odpovídá lokálním trendům či dokonce přizpůsobování potřebám jednotlivce. Archeologické bádání (např. Solberg 1984Westphal 2002: 254-266) se soustředil pouze na standardní typy, které se objevují ve větších množstvích. Tento stav se níže pokusíme napravit definováním variujících prvků. S narůstající pozorností, která bude věnována křidélkům, bude přibývat i počet variant, které nejsou zahrnuty. Tímto prosíme čtenáře a uživatele našich schémat o shovívavost a budeme rádi za jakékoli podněty a upozornění na nedostatky. Pokud by se tento nástroj určování křidélek kopí prosadil, bude zapotřebí vyřešit především problém špatného stavu křidélek, který může znemožňovat nebo pozměňovat zařazení.

Popis částí křidélek, které jsou zmíněné v textu.
Grafika: Tomáš Cajthaml.


Prvek 1: usazení vrchní strany křidélek
Vyjadřuje se k orientaci usazení vrchní strany křidélek vůči ose kopí. Usazením nazýváme počáteční bod křidélek.

Podle tohoto dělíme dělíme na:

A. usazení kolmé (usazení křidélek je kolmé vůči ose kopí)
B.
usazení přihnuté směrem k hrotu (úhel mezi osou kopí a usazením křidélka je menší než 90°)
C.
usazení přihnuté směrem k ratišti (úhel mezi osou kopí a usazením křidélka je větší než 90°)

Prvek 1: usazení vrchní strany křidélek.
Grafika: Tomáš Cajthaml.

 

Prvek 2: zakřivení vrchní strany vůči usazení
Vyjadřuje se ke vztahu vrchní strany křidélek vůči úhlu jejich usazení.

Podle tohoto dělíme dělíme na:

A. žádné (vrchní strana křidélek probíhá v přímce od usazení po vrcholek)
B.
konkávní (vrchní strana křidélek má tendenci probíhat od usazení po vrcholek ve vyduté křivce)
C.
konvexní (vrchní strana křidélek má tendenci probíhat od usazení po vrcholek ve vypuklé křivce)

Prvek 2: zakřivení vrchní strany vůči usazení.
Grafika: Tomáš Cajthaml.

 

Prvek 3: usazení a zakřivení spodní strany
Vyjadřuje se k podobě náběhu na spodní straně křidélek z tulejky kopí.

Podle tohoto dělíme dělíme na:

A. žádný náběh (spodní strana je kolmá vůči ose kopí)
B.
plynule konkávní náběh (spodní strana křidélek probíhá od usazení po vrcholek ve vyduté křivce)
C.
plynule konkávní náběh se schodem (spodní strana křidélek je odsazena schodem, někdy též zašpičatělým, následně probíhá po vrcholek ve vyduté křivce)
D.
přímý náběh (spodní strana křidélek probíhá od usazení po vrcholek v přímce)
E. plynule konvexní náběh (spodní strana křidélek probíhá od usazení po vrcholek ve vypuklé křivce)
F. plynule konkávní náběh s protaženými špicemi (vydutá spodní strana křidélek je protažena do dvou špicí přesahujících tulejku; mezi tyto nejsou počítány špice vytažené přímo z tulejky)
G. lomený náběh (spodní stranu křidélek tvoří dvě přímky, které se setkávají pod úhlem větším než 90°)

Prvek 3: usazení a zakřivení spodní strany.
Grafika: Tomáš Cajthaml.

 

Prvek 4: zakončení křidélek z čelního pohledu
Popisuje, jak vypadá vrchol křidélek při čelním pohledu.

Podle tohoto dělíme dělíme na:

A. zašpičatělý vrcholek (vrchní a spodní strana křidélek se setkávají v zašpičatělém bodu)
B.
plochý vrcholek (vrchní a spodní strana křidélek se setkávají v přímé plošce)
C.
plochý vrcholek se zpětnými háčky (vrchní a spodní strana křidélek se setkávají v přímé plošce se zpětnými háčky)
D.
vrcholek s oddělenými zpětnými háčky (vrchní strana křidélek je zakončena křivkou anebo přímou ploškou, spodní strana křidélek je zakončena zpětnými háčky, a mezi těmito se nachází jamka)
E.
zaoblený vrcholek (vrchní a spodní strana křidélek se setkávají v zaobleném vrcholku)
F. zaoblený vrcholek se zpětnými háčky (vrchní a spodní strana křidélek se setkávají v zaobleném vrcholku se zpětnými háčky)
G.
vrcholek s kuličkou (vrchní a spodní strana křidélek jsou zakončeny kuličkou)
H.
vrcholek se zvířecí hlavou (vrchní a spodní strana křidélek jsou zakončeny zvířecí hlavou)

Prvek 4: zakončení křidélek z čelního pohledu.
Grafika: Tomáš Cajthaml.


Prvek 5: zakončení křidélek z bočního pohledu
Popisuje, jak vypadá vrchol křidélek při bočním pohledu.

Podle tohoto dělíme dělíme na:

A. špice (vrcholek má z bočního pohledu ostrý, jednobodový profil)
B.
ostrá hrana (vrcholek má z bočního pohledu profil ostré či velmi úzké hrany do 3 mm)
C.
tupá hrana (vrcholek má z bočního pohledu tupou hranu)
D.
čtvercový či obdélníkový profil (vrcholek má z bočního pohledu profil ve tvaru širokého čtverce či obdélníku)
E.
kruhový či oválný profil (vrcholek má z bočního pohledu kruhový či oválný profil)
F. 
zvířecí hlava (vrcholek má z bočního pohledu vymodelovanou zvířecí hlavou)

Prvek 5: zakončení křidélek z bočního pohledu.
Grafika: Tomáš Cajthaml.

 

Prvek 6: profil křidélek při pohledu zespodu
Popisuje, jaký průřez má tulejka s křidélky při pohledu zespodu.

Podle tohoto dělíme dělíme na:

A. nezužovaný, rovný (z tulejky vystupují rovná a nezužovaná křidélka, ať úzká či tlustá)
B. nezužovaný a s ohnutými vrcholky (z tulejky vystupují rovná a nezužovaná křidélka, jejíž vrcholky jsou ohnuty)
C. zužovaný do špice (z tulejky vystupují křidélka, která se zužují do špice)
D. zužovaný do tupé hrany na vrcholku (z tulejky vystupují křidélka, která se zužují do tupé hrany)
E. zužovaný ve vlnovce (z tulejky vystupují vlnitá křidélka, která se zužují)
F. zužovaný, před vrcholkem rozšířený do útvaru (z tulejky vystupují zužovaná křidélka, která se následně rozšiřují do útvaru, např. zvířecí hlavy, tvořícího vrcholek)
G. nezužovanýrovný, na vrcholku rozšířený do kuličky (z tulejky vystupují rovná a nezužovaná křidélka, jejíž vrcholky tvoří kuličky či podobné útvary)
H. schodovitý (z tulejky vystupují schodovitě zužovaná křidélka)
I. zužovaný a zahnutý (z tulejky vystupují křidélka zahnutá na jednu stranu, která se zužují)

Prvek 6: profil křidélek při pohledu zespodu
Grafika: Tomáš Cajthaml.


Nyní je na čase, abychom postoupili k praktické části, do které jsme prozatím zařadili 23 kusů raně středověkých kopí s křidélky. Zařazení křidélek bude probíhat podle kompletnějšího či zachovalejšího křidélka. Je možné se setkat s kopími, jejichž každé křidélko lze zařadit různě, jedná se však spíše o výjimky, neboť výrobci se většinou snažili dosáhnout symetrie.

1A.2A.3A.4B.5C.6A
Niederstotzingen, hrob 6, datované do 650-680. Westphal 2002: 246-247, kat. č. 3.3.8.

 

1A.2A.3B.4B.5C.6A
Walsum, hrob 6, datované do 2. čtvrt. 8. století. Westphal 2002: 242-243, kat. č. 3.3.4.

 

1A.2A.3B.4A.5A.6C
Hage, Norsko, Solberg typ VI 1B, spadající do let cca 750-850. Kat č. B11315.

 

1A.2A.3C.4B.5C.6A
Straume, Norsko, Solberg typ IX 1B, spadající do let cca 950-1050. Kat č. C24488.

 

1A.2A.3G.4B.5C.6A
Lutomiersk, datováno do 11. století. Nadolski 1954: Tab. XXVII:4.

 

1A.2A.3B.4B.5D.6B
Dugo Selo, Chorvatsko, datováno kolem roku 800. Demo 2010: Fig. 1.

 

1B.2C.3B.4E.5C.6I
Sahlenburg, hrob 68, datované do 750-800. Westphal 2002: 226-227, kat. č. 3.2.3.

 

1C.2B.3B.4B.5C.6E
Franské kopí, Palatium, Ostrów Tumski, Poznaň. Výstava “Kiedy Poznan był grodem… Uzbrojenie“.

 

1C.2B.3C.4B.5C.6A
Kjorstad nedre, Norsko, Solberg typ VI 2B, spadající do let cca 850-950. Kat č. C30253.

 

1B.2C.3C.4C.5B.6A
Velká Británie, datované do 9.-10. století. British Museum 2019.

 

1A.2A.3B.4C.5C.6A
Østre Toten, Norsko, Solberg typ VI 2B, spadající do let cca 850-950. Kat č. C20909.

 

1A.2A.3B.4G.5E.6G
Neckartenzlingen, datováno typologicky do 8. století. Westphal 2002: 248-250, kat. č. 3.3.11.

 

 1A.2B.3B.4B.5C.6I
Krefeld-Gellep, hrob 1782, datováno k roku 525. Reichmann 2013: 269, Fig. 3.

 

 1B.2C.3F.4B.5D.6A
Krefeld-Gellep, hrob 6352, datováno do 1. pol. 4. století. Reichmann 2013: 268, Fig. 2.

 

1B.2C.3C.4B.5B.6D
Frestedt, datované do druhé poloviny 8. století. Westphal 2002: 239-241, kat. č. 3.3.2.

 

1A.2B.3E.4A.5A.6C
Haugen, Norsko, kat. č. C21961. Datováno mezi roky 840-900.
Nørgård-Jørgensen 1999: 233-235, kat. č. 52:7, Pl. 27.

 

1A.2A.3D.4B.5B.6A
Stade, datované do 8. století. Westphal 2002: 228, kat. č. 3.2.5.

 

1C.2B.3B.4B.5A.6E
Hemeln, datované do druhé poloviny 8. století. Westphal 2002: 233, kat. č. 3.2.11.

 

1C.2B.3B.4B.5C.6A
Poznań-Luboń, Polsko. Kostrzewski 1947.

 

1A.2C.3C.4H.5C.6A
Farnhem, Anglie. Datováno do 11. století. Lang 1981: Pl. XV; Wardell 1849: Fig. 2.

 

1C.2C.3B.4H.5C.6A
Vesilahti-Suomela, Finsko. Kivikoski 1973: Taf. 134, Abb. 1182.

 

1C.2B.3E.4A.5A.6C
Perniö-Paarskylä, Finsko. Kivikoski 1973: Taf. 134, Abb. 1183.

 

1B.2C.3B.4H.5F.6F
Bargen, hrob 7, konec 7. století. Dauber 1955: Abb. 3B.


V závěru bychom měli určitě zmínit, že badatelé se dosud koukali na funkci křidélek pouze loveckou optikou, bez jakékoli praktické zkušenosti s prací kopím. Kvůli tomu byla problematika přehlížena a křidélkům se nedostalo systematičtějšího zpracování. To se nyní mění díky reenactorům, kteří si nechávají vyrábět přesné repliky a v některých případech se i snaží o rekonstrukci původních bojových technik.

Absence jakéhokoli serióznějšího pokusu o praktický výklad křidélek zaslepovala badatele i reenactory a znemožňovala představu o komplexnosti raně středověkého válečnictví. V první řadě je nyní obvyklým tvrzením, že kopí byla využívána za použití obou rukou. Pro některé masivnější či delší kusy toto samozřejmě platí, což ukazuje i ikonografie, avšak drtivá většina našich zdrojů směřuje k obsluhovatelnosti jednou rukou v kombinaci se štítem. Tato specifická kombinace, kterou lze najít v mnoha kulturách na světě, byla záměrně využívána v určité fázi střetu. Ikonografie ukazuje, že jednoručně svíraná kopí v pozemním boji byla třímána s palcem směrem od hrotu – toto může být praktické hned ze čtyř důvodů:

  • experimenty potvrdily větší průraznost
  • možnost kopí rychle vrhnout
  • větší bezpečí palce
  • lepší schopnost “zabodnout” nepřátelské kopí směrem k zemi

Tloušťka dochovaných ratišť a tulejek ukazuje, že drtivá většina ratišť se pohybovala okolo tloušťky 20-30 mm a byly zužované. Tato tloušťka se experimentálně ukázala jako univerzální a kopí se štípaným ratištěm o tomto průměru je dostatečně flexibilní a pevné, aby dobře snášelo jednoruční a obouruční použití a současně i vrhání coby oštěpu. Celková váha kopí tak mohla být až na výjimky v rozmezí 0,5-1,5 kg.

Boj kopím na výšivce z Bayeux.

Příklady boje kopím s křidélky.
Vlevo: Corbijský žaltář (Amiens Bibliothèque municipale Ms. 18, fol. 123v), kolem roku 800 (Paulsen 1969: Fig.4:2). Vpravo: Zlatý kodex z Echternachu (Nuremberg, Germanisches Nationalmuseum, Hs. 156142, fol. 78), 1030-1050 (Fuglesang 1980: Pl. 110C).

Přijmeme-li tento fakt, může nás to posunout dále v některých myšlenkách. Při střetu, ve kterém měla kopí převahu – tedy zřejmě všechna evropská bojiště raného středověku – představují křidélka výhodu a nadstavbu, jež zajišťuje vyšší výkon. Máme na mysli především tři praktické skutečnosti:

  • existuje korelace mezi výškou křidélek, šířkou břitu a tloušťkou ratiště. Rozpětí křidélek je zásadně stejné nebo větší než šířka břitu – kopí s úzkým břitem mají zpravidla nízká křidélka, kopí s širším břitem mají zpravidla vyšší křidélka. Pro výraznou většinu franského, polského a chorvatského materiálu (a zřejmě i dalšího, pro které neexistují podklady) platí, že při vnějším průměru tulejky 25-36 mm je rozpětí křidélek 59-90 mm a výška křidélek 17-34 mm (Demo 2010Westphal 2002Sankiewicz – Wyrwa 2018: 208). Tento poměr svědčí o tom, že rozpětí křidélek není náhodné, nýbrž je záměrně voleno tak, aby bylo schopno zastavit hrot v případě penetrace. Zdá se nám pravděpodobné, že téměř všechna křidélka s výjimkou křidélek s prvkem 2C mohla dobře posloužit k “odbodávání” nepřátelských kopí směrem k zemi – v podstatě jde o zastavení protiútoku rychlým a přesně mířeným úderem křidélky do oblasti tulejky nebo ratiště. Zejména kopí s velmi vysokými křidélky nebo křidélky s prvky 1B a některá křidélka s prvky 2B naznačují, že jsou konstruována pro co nejlepší manipulaci s protivníkovým kopím, případně též další zbraní.

 

  • Dlouhou dobu se mezi reenactory spekuluje o hákování pomocí křidélek, ale nakolik víme, prozatím nikdo nepřinesl přesvědčivé důkazy. Zejména křidélka s prvky 2C, 3C, 4C, 4D, 4F jsou dobře uzpůsobena k hákování objektů. Můžeme si představit, že mezi hákované předměty mohl být okraj štítu a zbraň nepřítele. Zahákování může mít velký praktický význam. Je možné, že s hákováním souvisí také prvky 6B a 6I. V Sáze o Þórim Zlatém (Gull-Þóris saga, kap. 10) se nachází zmínka o pokusu hákovat štít kopím.

 

  • Třetí často diskutovanou otázku, zda je možné křidélka prakticky využít k sekání kopím, je možné podpořit. Zásah víceméně všemi typy křidélek bude mít pozitivní ničivý účinek. Mezi nejlépe vybavená kopí můžeme počítat ta, která mají prvky 4A, 4C, 4G, 5A, 5B, 5E, 6C, 6E, 6G.

Použitá a doporučená literatura

British Museum (2019). Spear-head, Museum number 1856,0701.1449. Elektronický zdroj: https://www.britishmuseum.org/research/collection_online/collection_object_details.aspx?objectId=85949&partId=1&from=ad&fromDate=700&to=ad&toDate=1200&object=20259&page=2, navštíveno 1.6.2019.

Creutz, Kristina (2003). Tension and tradition: a study of late Iron Age spearheads around the Baltic Sea, Stockholm.

Dauber, Albrecht (1955). Ein fränkisches Grab mit Prunklanze aus Bargen, Ldkr. Sinsheim (Baden). In: Germania, Bd. 33 Nr. 4, 381-390.

Demo, Željko (2010). Ranosrednjovjekovno koplje s krilcima iz okolice Dugog Sela u svjetlu novih saznanja o ovoj vrsti oružja na motki. In: Archaeologia Adriatica, Vol. 4. No. 1., 61-84.

Fuglesang, Signe Horn (1980). Some Aspects of the Ringerike Style : A phase of 11th century Scandinavian art, Odense.

Hjardar, Kim – Vike, Vegard (2011). Vikinger i krig, Oslo.

Kivikoski, Ella (1973). Die Eisenzeit Finnlands: Bildwerk und Text, Helsinki.

Kostrzewski, Józef (1947). Kultura prapolska, Poznań.

Kouřil, Pavel (2005). Frühmittelalterliche Kriegergräber mit Flügellanzen und Sporen des Typs Biskupija-Crkvina auf mährischen Nekropolen. In: Die Frühmittelalterliche Elite bei den Völkern des östlichen Mitteleuropas : (mit einem speziellen Blick auf die großmährische Problematik) : Materialien der internationalen Fachkonferenz : Mikulčice, 25.-26.5.2004Brno, 67-99.

Kurasiński, Tomasz (2005). Waffen im Zeichenkreis. Über die in den Gräbern auf den Gebieten des frühmittelalterlichen Polen vorgefundenen Flügellanzenspitzen. In: Sprawozdania Archeologiczne, vol. 57, 165-213.

Lang, James T. (1981). A Viking Age Spear-Socket from York. In: Medieval Archaeology, 25, 1981: 157–160, Pl. XV.

Leppäaho, Jorma (1964). Späteisenzeitliche Waffen aus Finnland: Schwertinschriften und Waffenverzierungen des 9. – 12. Jahrhunderts ; ein Tafelwerk, Helsinki.

Nadolski, Andrzej (1954). Studia nad uzbrojeniem polskim w X, XI i XII wieku, Łódź.

Nørgård Jørgensen, Anne (1999). Waffen & Gräber. Typologische und chronologische Studien zu skandinavischen Waffengräbern 520/30 bis 900 n.Chr., København.

Oehrl, Sigmund (2013) Bear hunting and its ideological context (as a background for the interpretation of bear claws and other remains of bears in Germanic graves of the 1st millennium AD). In: Grimm, O. – Schmölcke, U. (eds.). Hunting in Northern Europe until 1500 AD – Old Traditions and Regional Developments, Neumünster, 267-332.

Paulsen, Peter (1969). Flügellanzen: Zum archäologischen Horizont der Wiener Sancta lancea. In: Frühmittelalterliche Studien 3, 289—312.

Petersen, Jan (1919). De Norske Vikingesverd: En Typologisk-Kronologisk Studie Over Vikingetidens Vaaben. Kristiania.

Reichmann, Christoph (2013). Late ancient Germanic hunting in Gaul based on selected archaeological examples. In: Grimm, O. – Schmölcke, U. (eds.). Hunting in Northern Europe until 1500 AD – Old Traditions and Regional Developments, Neumünster, 267-276.

Ruttkay, Alexander (1975). Waffen und Reiterausrüstung des 9. bis zur ersten Hälfte des 14. Jahrhunderts in der Slowakei (I). In: Slovenská Archeológia XXIII / 1, Bratislava, 119-216.

Sankiewicz, Paweł – Wyrwa, Andrzej M. (2018). Broń drzewcowa i uzbrojenie ochronne z Ostrowa Lednickiego, Giecza i Grzybowa, Lednica.

Solberg, Bergljot (1984). Norwegian Spear-Heads from the Merovingian and Viking Periods, Universitetet i Bergen. Dizertační práce.

Wardell, J. (1849). Antiquities and Works of Art Exhibited. In: Archaeological Journal 6, 401–2.

Westphal, Herbert (2002). Franken oder Sachsen?: Untersuchungen an frühmittelalterlichen Waffen, Oldenburg.

Westphalen, Petra (2002). Die Eisenfunde von Haithabu. Die Ausgrabungen in Haithabu 10, Neumünster.

The Period Transport of Liquids

The transport and the storage of liquids are one of the biggest problems in the reenactment of any time period. Archaeological finds are only a few and making a keg or flask needs skill. For a person living in 21st century, it is much easier and cheaper to load a barrel of beer and some bottles of water to a car and after that hide everything in a tent. On historical events, there are principles of hiding modern bottles, however we would be lying, if we said that it is a generally valid and strictly followed convention.

If we move from a camp to a march, there is a necessity to have a field bottle, because in our luggage there is a limited space for equipment. In such a case, we are going to plan our way close to the springs and streams. Scandinavian streams (Old Norse lœkr) and mountain rivers have stayed drinkable even up till now, so if the Old Norse people made a good journey plan, they had no thirst. In the corpus of Old Norse dictionary, there is a term rǫst (“mile”), which literally means “distance between two halts”. Literary sources show existence of route with some fixed halts, which were located near the water streams.

Reconstruction of the farmstead Stöng, Iceland.

Even buildings and farmsteads were built near to the water streams. Water is necessary for a household, and people settled there not only because of water, but also because of fish. In some sources, the connection of a farm and a stream more than obvious:

Next to Ásólf’s hall, there was a river. Winter started and the river was full of fish. Þorgeir claimed that they settled on his fishing grounds, so Ásólf moved and built the second hall on west near to another river.
(The book of settlement, chap. 21, Hauskbók version)

The same situation was during the settlement of Iceland. Settlers often took up land, surrounded by two water streams. In addition, there was the law that the settler could take more land than she or he could walk around in one day. The farmstead Stöng, which was built in 11th century and covered by volcano ash in 1104, follows the same logic – it was built on a hill approximately one kilometer above the Fossá river. In densely built-up areas, water drained from wells. The most of farms did not need wells, because they had access to water streams (Short 2003: 74).

The containers for a water transportation can be divided to big volume containers and small volume containers. Among the big volume containers belong barrels, buckets and bigger ceramic vessels. Their volume can be between ones and hundreds of litres and they served for crowds, e.g. farm residents, merchants or soldiers on war expeditions. However, the dimension limits mobility, as can be shown by the quote from the Eyrbyggja saga (chap. 39):

Then too was it the custom of all the shipmen to have their drink in common, and a bucket should stand by the mast with the drink therein, and a locked lid was over it. But some of the drink was in barrels, and was added to the bucket thence as soon as it was drunk out.

The transport of barrels at the Bayeux tapestry.

The small volume containers were using for needs of individuals and they were parts of personal equipment. We are talking about different kinds of flasks, bags and bottles, which had limited volume – only up to several litres, but it was not difficult to carry them. It is necessary to add, that there are almost no preserved containers from Scandinavian area, so we have to use the written sources or look for the analogic finds from the period Europe.

The barrel from Haithabu.

The biggest container from the Viking period is a barrel (Old Norse: tunni, verpill). The barrels are well preserved in archeological, written and iconographic sources. In the previous written example, we can see the barrels were used for long-term storage of water on ships. Barrels also served for fermentation and storage of beverages in the halls. A big barrel with the volume of approximately 800 litres was found in Haithabu, Germany. Similar finds are known also from the Rome Empire period. Barrels of this kind are also depicted in the Bayeux Tapestry, where they are loaded on both carts and shoulders and carried to the ships. The Tapestry comments this depiction with these words: “These men carry arms to the ships and here they drag a cart laden with wine and arms.

A slightly smaller container is represented by a bucket, a tub and a vat (Old Norse: ker). The main advantage is a handle for the easier transport. It could be the most frequent big volume container of the period. A bucket was not provided with a permanent lid, because the liquid was meant for an immediate consumption. If it was necessary, the bucket could be covered by a removable lid (Old Norse: hlemmr or lok, see the quote from Eyrbyggja saga). The finds of buckets are well preserved in Oseberg and Haithabu. In Haithabu, they found imported big volume ceramics (so called Reliefbandamphoren) as well, which could be used for similar purpose thanks to transportation eyelets.

Opening of a bottle.  Made by Jakub Zbránek and Zdeněk Kubík.

We know only a few finds of flasks and bottles (Old Norse: flaska) made of leather, ceramics, wood, metal and glass in Early medieval Europe. Absence of local anorganic bottles in Scandinavia is a sign of the fact that organic materials were mainly used. From the following list, it is evident that ceramic, metal and glass bottles were imported to Scandinavia.

There are only a few written mentions about bottles from Scandinavia and they all are of the late date. It is interesting that some mentions are connected with bynames of people living in the Viking Age. We can find Þorsteinn flǫskuskegg (“bottle beard“) and Þorgeirr flǫskubak (“bottle back“) among the Icelandic settlers.


  • Leather bottle, made by Petr Ospálek.

    Leather bottles – it is the only kind mentioned in Old Norse sources. In Grettis saga (chap. 11), there is a funny story of Þorgeirr flǫskubak who is attacked by an assassin to his back, but he manages to survive, because the axe of the assassin hits a leather flask:

“That morning, Þorgeirr got ready to row out to sea, and two men with him, one called Hámundr, the other Brandr. Þorgeirr went first, and had on his back a leather bottle [leðrflaska] and drink therein. It was very dark, and as he walked down from the boat-stand Þorfinn ran at him, and smote him with an axe betwixt the shoulders, and the axe sank in, and the bottle squeaked, but he let go the axe, for he deemed that there would be little need of binding up, and would save himself as swiftly as might be. [Now it is to be said of Þorgeirr, that he turned from the blow as the axe smote the bottle, nor had he any wound. [Thereat folk made much mocking, and called Þorgeirr Bottleback, and that was his by-name ever after.”

This part continues with a stanza with this meaning: “Earlier the famous men cut their swords into enemies’ bodies, but now a coward hit a flask with whey by an axe. Even though it is a nice example of an Old Norse perception of society decline, but we can notice the mention about whey (Old Norse sýra). The whey was mixed with water in a ratio 1:11 and created a popular Icelandic drink, the so-called blanda (for the exactl mixture, see here, page 26). The saga suggests that Þorgeirr has got such a drink in his flask.

The leather flasks are mentioned in Anglo-Saxon sources and are archaeologically documented in Ireland, where were found some decorated pieces from 12th century. They are lightweight and ideal for long hikes. They are resistant against damage too. But sometimes water is running through, whis is a disadvantage. Summary, I recommend to reconstruct of leather variants.



A replica of a wooden bottle, made by CEA.


 

  • Ceramics bottles – ceramics bottles were popular for the whole Early medieval period. They were used in the the Roman times (Roman ceramics amphoras for a wine transporting are known from Rhineland), in the Migration period, as well as in the period of 9th to 11th century. One piece was found in Winchester, England (11th century, photos here, here, here), another one in Gnezdovo, Russia (10th century, photo here) and yet another in Great Moravian Staré Město (9th century, photos here and here). In Belgian Ertvelde-Zelzate (9th century, here), a painted flask was found. Analogies of this bottle were found in Dorestad and in Norwegian Kaupang too. The find from Kaupang is represented by nine orange painted shards – the only proof of ceramics flasks in Scandinavia (Skre 2011: 293). The similar shape to Roman amphoras remained popular in the Rhineland, and it devepoled into so-called Reliefbandamphoren that are up to 70 cm high. Some pieces were found in Haithabu as well. Ceramic bottles seem to be popular in Eastern Europe as well.


    The pottery industry of Viking Age Scandinavia was not very developed, so we can presume that all the ceramic bottles in Scandinavia were imported. Me and my colleagues were using this type for years and it proved to be very practical. On the other hand, the use is very questionable in Scandinavia.


  • Bronze bottle from Aska.

    Metal bottles – an unique copper-alloy bottle was found in the woman’s grave in Aska, Sweden. According to works, which I found on the internet (here and here), the grave dated to 10th century and the container is considered a Persian import, because of the inscription. The origin limits the usage in reenactment. A similar bottle was found in FölhagenGotland, and it is dated to the of 10th century (the picture on demand).

  • Glass bottles – I am aware of two Scandinavian bottle necks made of glass, they are very rare finds. The first one was found in Haithabu and is dated to the 9th century (Schiezel 1998: 62, Taf. 13:1–2). The second one was found in a rich female grave from Trå, Norway, dated to the 10th century. Pictures on demand.

All the mentioned bottles except the glass and metal examples do have the eyelets. So, we can suppose that they had got a strap for a hanging. To my knowledge, stoppers are never preserved, so they probably were made of wood. The experiments showed that oaken lathed or hand-made mushroom or cylinder-shaped stoppers are functional. While a simple wooden stopper works for wooden and leather bottles, in case of other materials, it is useful if the stopper is a bit smaller and wrapped in a textile, so the neck is not destroyed by the harder material of the stopper. 

I believe that the article provided a brief summary of Early medieval liquid containers. For reenactment purposes, I recommend to use the barrels and buckets for camp life and the bottles for a march. This can also lead to reconstructing proper banquet tools, like spoons, scoop and ladles, that are present in the sources. If needed, write your feedback into the comments, the problem of a liquid transportation is still opened. Many thanks to Roman Král, Zdeněk Kubík, Jan Zajíc and Jakub Zbránek, who helped me with this article and answered my questions. 


Bibliography

The book of settlement – Landnamabók I-III: Hauksbók, Sturlubók, Melabók. Ed. Finnur Jónsson, København 1900.

Grettis saga – Saga o Grettim. Přel. Ladislav Heger, Praha 1957. Originál online.

Eyrbyggja saga – Sága o lidech z Eyru. Přel. Ladislav Heger. In: Staroislandské ságy, Praha 1965: 35–131.

Cleasby, Richard  Vigfússon, Gudbrand (1874). An Icelandic-English dictionary, Toronto.

Schietzel, Kurt (1998). Die Glasfunde von Haithabu, Berichte über die Ausgrabungen in Haithabu 32, Neumünster.

Short, William R. (2010). Icelanders in the Viking Age: The People of the Sagas, Jefferson.

Skre, Dagfinn (ed.) (2011). Things from the Town. Artefacts and Inhabitants in Viking-age Kaupang. Kaupang Excavation Project Publication series, vol. 3., Århus.

 

For those interested in wooden barrels, buckets and ceramic vessels, I recommend these books:

Hübener, Wolfgang (1959). Die Keramik von Haithabu, Neumünster.

Janssen, Walter (1987). Die Importkeramik von Haithabu, Neumünster.

Wesphal, Florian (2006). Die Holzfunde von Haithabu, Neumünster.

Amputace dolních končetin raného středověku a jejich protézy

Kolskegg s sebou prudce trhl a sekl po Kolovi mečem s takovou silou, že mu usekl nohu nad kolenem.
‚Dobrá rána, což?’ zeptal se Kolskegg.
‚Doplatil jsem na to, že jsem se nechránil štítem,’ odpověděl Kol a nějakou chvíli stál na jedné noze a díval se na pahýl druhé své nohy.
‚Nepotřebuješ se moc dívat. Je to, jak vidíš: noha je pryč,’ smál se Kolskegg.
Kol se pak zvrátil mrtev k zemi.
(Sága o Njálovi 63)

Díky životu v jedné z nebezpečnější zemi této planety, dlouhému období míru a funkční medicíně jsme zapomněli na hrůzy války a metly lidstva, díky čemuž se nám obtížně hodnotí kvalita života v minulosti. Současně nejsme schopni plně docenit jistoty, v nichž žijeme, a nesnáze, kterými naši předci museli projít. V následujícím článku se zaměříme na opomíjenou problematiku amputovaných končetin v důsledku nemocí a válečných zranění i protéz těchto tělesných částí v období raného středověku. Doufáme, že čtenáři z řad reenactorů a zájemců o historii naleznou v článku málo reflektovanou nadstavbu.


Nemoci a zranění dolních končetin, amputace

Staroseverská literatura zachovává více než pět desítek příjmí, která mají souvislost s nohama (Jónsson 1908: 219-223). Řada z nich reaguje na nemoci nohou, nohy podivně tvarované či zmrzačení nohou v bojovém konfliktu, které mělo za následek doživotní kulhání, a reflektují tak odlišnost nebo handicap (Sexton 2010). Mezi běžné nemoci postihující nohy rozhodně patřily ischemie, aterosklerózy, diabetická noha a infekce. Stěží si již dnes představíme taková onemocnění, jako je lepra nebo obrna, které byly ve středověku rozšířené (Hernigou 2014aHernigou 2014b). Mezi středověké úrazy museli patřit zlomeniny a amputační zranění. Nejčastější formou amputačních zraněních v klinikách v neindustrializovaných zemích je ztráta končetiny nebo jejího části, způsobená nehodami při práci se stroji, zvířaty, dopravními prostředky a při pádech z výšky (Binder 2016: 30). Jak se tedy zdá, dolní končetiny pod kolenem patřily společně s prsty na rukou mezi nejvíce amputované části lidského těla i v období středověku.

Rekonstrukce fixace zlomeniny dolní končetiny kolem roku 1350.
Zdroj: van der Mark 2016.

Jakákoli zranění byla velmi náchylná na infekce, které představovaly v předantibiotické éře vážnou medicínskou výzvu (Erdem et al 2011Runcie 2015) a které zřejmě někdy ústily v amputace; zranění utržená na britské straně v 1. světové válce měla míru infekce vyšší než 90%. Lékaři raného středověku sice ovládali jednoduché chirurgické úkony (nařezávání, vypalování a vyplachování ran, narovnávání kostí) a byli schopni poskytnout základní péči (ovazování, podávání bylinných výluhů, přikládání kamenů a bylin, rytí run a zaříkávání), avšak neměli možnost pracovat ve sterilním prostředí, neměli znalost prevence bakteriální infekce a jejich diagnostika byla na poměry dnešní medicíny na žalostně nízké úrovni (Vlasatý 2017). Kvůli tomu byla pooperační úmrtnost po vážných chirurgických zákrocích circa 60-80 % (Smith et al 2012: 36). Kvůli vysoké úmrtnosti se amputace před zavedením moderních anestezie a antiseptik příliš nerozmohly (Van Cant 2018: 199). Amputacím se zřejmě také vyhýbalo z toho důvodu, že “nekompletní lidé” mohli být považováni za nekompetentní k vládě či poznamenáni v posmrtném světě (Sellegren 1982: 13), případně muži z důvodu své pýchy nedovolili amputovat nebo ošetřující odmítli amputaci s tím, že neponesou zodpovědnost za pacientovo zmrzačení (Friedmann 1972: 117).

Simon Mays (1996) shromáždil celkem 27 archeologických amputací, přičemž 5 z nich pochází z předmoderní doby. Ve třech případech se jedná o amputace pravých dolních končetin, které se objevují i v nálezech, které Mays nezahrnul (Van Cant 2018: 196). Mays uvádí tři hlavní důvody amputací ve středověku (Mays 1996: 107):

  • chirurgický zákrok spojený s nemocí či zraněním
  • vykonání trestu podle zákona
  • chirurgický zákrok spojený s válečným zraněním

Naproti tomu Friedmann (1972: 120) vyčleňuje poněkud jiné spektrum historických amputací:

  • chirurgický zákrok spojený se závažným onemocněním
  • oddělení končetiny v ozbrojeném střetu
  • vykonání trestu podle zákona
  • chirurgický zákrok spojený s válečným zraněním
  • chirurgický zákrok spojený s omrzlinami

Amputace prováděné z důvodu chronické nemoci lze předpokládat ve velké míře. Zmiňují je písemné zmínky z období křížových výprav (Mitchell 2004) a lze je předpokládat také v případě některých mnichů, jejichž pohřbená těla byla nalezena u kláštera ve švýcarském St. Petersinsel (Van Cant 2018: 196). Amputace napadených končetin jsou zmíněny nejméně ve dvou pramenech z období 11. a 12. století. V obou případech se jedná o gilotinové amputace, od kterých se již postupně upouští na úkor amputací lalokových (Janoušek 2015: 18-21). První ze zdrojů nám zanechal nejlepší arabský lékař Al-Zahráví, též zvaný Albucasis (Friedmann 1972: 126-127):

Neustupuje-li sněť předloktí či nohou léčbě, je potřeba je odříznout nad loktem či nad kolenem, aby se nešířila a nestala se smrtelnou. Končetina by měla být nad i pod úrovní řezu slabě obvázaná, zatímco pomocník vytváří tlak na vrchní obvaz, aby se kůže a maso mohly zatáhnout. Provádí se kruhový řez až ke kosti, z obou stran se přikládají lněné podušky, aby se zabránilo tvorbě vředů, a následně se seká nebo řeže kost. Pokud se během zákroku objeví krvácení, rychle vypaluj nebo užij prášku zastavující krvácení, užij vhodného zábalu a ošetřuj do uzdravení.

Druhým zdrojem je lombardský překladatel arabských a antických textů Gerard z Cremony (Bennion 1980: 51):

Pokud má nemoc navrch nad naší léčbou, úd musí být uříznut (…). Na prvním místě je potřeba zvážit míru nápravy, prospěšnosti a nebezpečnosti. Z toho důvodu činíme řez nožem mezi zdravými a chorobnými částmi až ke kosti, s tím předpokladem, že nikdy neřežeme do opačné části a vždy zahrneme kus zdravé, než bychom ponechali kus nemocné. Jakmile dospějeme ke kosti, zdravé maso je třeba zatáhnout do té míry, že se kost obnaží. Tehdy ji musíme přeříznout pilou hned u zdravého masa. V místě, kde pila zanechala jakékoli otřepy na konci kosti, je třeba je zabrousit, a překryjeme celý pahýl volnou kůží.

Tyto zmínky musíme brát jako vrchol tehdejší chirurgie, nicméně můžeme z nich získat základní informace o tom, jak probíhal zákrok. Můžeme vidět, že amputace byla rychlou záležitostí, trvající několik málo minut, a byla týmovou prací, která zahrnovala chirurga a jednoho či více asistentů, kteří pacienta drželi, podávali vybavení a podobně. Často si myslíme, že operace probíhaly bez anestezie, ale přinejmenším Peršané a Arabové již v raném středověku používali anestezii podávanou orálně nebo inhalačně (Meri 2005: 784). Přinejmenším ve vikinské Skandinávii známe tři látky, které k těmto účelům mohly posloužit – alkohol, konopí a blín (Price 2002: 205-206). Zdá se, že rány byly často vypalovány, aby bylo zastaveno silné krvácení, což ústilo v těžké popáleniny, které se obtížně hojily.

Můžeme dát za pravdu Williamsové (1920: 358), když říká, že raně středověký chirurg zřejmě nejčastěji vlastnil pilku, nůž, pinzetu, jehlu a nit. Můžeme se domnívat, že nožů zřejmě vlastnil několik, a měl rovněž nůžky, pinzety, rašple, svorky na uzavření ran a množství čistého textilu (Frölich 2011).

Výběr pilek raného středověku z různých evropských lokalit.

Výběr pinzet raného středověku z různých evropských lokalit.

Výběr raně středověkých nůžek. Zdroj: Westphalen 2002: Abb. 32.

Výběr raně středověkých nožů. Zdroj: Westphalen 2002: Abb. 62.

Je nutné zmínit, že i v moderních nemocnicích je míra zasažení pahýlu amputovaných končetin infekcí kolem 13-40 % (de Godoy et al 2010). Úspěšné zotavení však nezávisí pouze na zahojení rány – významnou část pacientů s úspěšnými amputacemi trápí psychické problémy (Sahu et al 2016), které je potřeba řešit stejnou měrou jako obtíže fyzické. Důležitá je rovněž intenzivní fyzioterapická rehabilitace, která postiženého pacienta navrátí do normálního života (např. Rau et al 2007);  zejména u starších osob je amputace dolních končetin problémová, protože ztrátu nejsou schopni nahradit svými fyzickými fondy, a často dochází k brzkému úmrtí (Klaphake et al 2017). Asi 90 % lidí s dolní končetinou amputovanou pod kolenem se naučí chodit s protézou (Pavlačková 2012: 13). Lze říci, že pokud byl zraněný člověk ošetřen kvalitně, rychle a dostatečně sterilně, a byl v dobré fyzické kondici, měl šanci na zotavení a pokračování v normálním životě. Obecně vzato se zdá, že lidé s protézami jedné dolní končetiny mají větší úspěšnost navázat manželství, mít děti a získat práci, než lidé s protézami obou dolních končetin (Claspe – Ramasamy 2013: 71-72). Na vině může být kromě jiného fakt, že výška nohou v porovnání s celkovou výškou je důležitá pro atraktivní a zdravý vzhled (Bogin – Varela-Silva 2010).

Zranění hlavy a dolních končetin se zdají být nejčastějšími válečnými traumaty středověku (Matzke 2011: 62-73; Thordeman 1939: 160-178). V rodových ságách bojovníci běžně přicházejí o paže, ruce, prsty nebo nohy (Sexton 2010: 152). Pokud se zaměříme na raně středověká zranění dolních končetin, zmínit můžeme zranění nohy muže pohřbeného v gokstadské mohyle v Norsku (Holck 2009: 44-46), zranění holeně u raně středověké kostry z Maastrichtu (Woosnam-Savage – DeVries 2015: 35) či zhojenou ránu na holeni u člena zmasakrované posádky Budče (Štefan et al 2016: 766, Table 2). Cílení na dolní končetiny, zejména holeně, je logické z řady důvodů. Nohy tvoří zhruba polovinu výšky dospělého člověka (Bogin – Varela-Silva 2010: 1052-1053), a experimenty ukázaly, že i když nositel disponuje štítem, může pro něj být efektivní obrana dolních končetin obtížná (Matzke 2011: 67 a vlastní mnohaletá zkušenost). Přinejmenším v raném středověku evidujeme pouze málo dokladů o používání ochranných prostředků dolních končetin v boji. Pokud cílem nebyla fyzická likvidace oponenta, mohlo být úderů na spodní končetiny záměrně využíváno. Oblast hlavy je totiž třikrát náchylnější na smrtelné úrazy než zbytek těla (Gennarelli et al 1989). Holenní kost patří mezi nejpevnější kosti v lidském těle a jen zřídkakdy dochází k jejímu přeseknutí (Thordeman 1939: 171). Ačkoli tržná zranění končetin provází bolestivá agonie, smrt nastává až po dlouhé době, a je tedy možná záchrana (Rhyne et al 1995).

Extrémní příklad středověké chirurgie: kost pažní nalezená u kláštera ve švédském Varnhemu (SHM 18393:1090), která vykazuje zhojenou zlomeninu způsobenou sekerou. Chirurg se pokusil o osteosyntézu měděným plechem.


Protézy dolních končetin

Pokud se budeme chtít podívat na příklady raně středověkých protéz, můžeme použít tří různých pramenů – archeologie, ikonografie a písemných zdrojů.

Dějiny protéz dolních končetin jsou poměrně dlouhé. Archeologie zná dvě funkční egyptské dřevěné protézy palců, které byly vyrobeny zhruba v letech 1065-600 př. n. l. (Finch 2018), jakož i dřevěnou holeň pokrytou bronzovým plechem z italského hrobu v Santa Maria di Capua Vetere (cca 300 př. n. l.) či dřevěnou holeň přivazovanou ke stehnu, zakončenou koňským kopytem s rohovým bodcem z čínského Shengjindianu ze stejného období (Binder 2016: 30). Z období raného středověku fakticky známe tři nálezy, a je zajímavé, že z období pozdějšího středověku je prakticky neznáme. Prvním je hrob ze švýcarského Bonaduzu (5.-7. století), který ukrýval muže s uříznutým chodidlem v kotníku, místo něhož měl kožený vak vyplněný senu podobným materiálem s dřevěnou podrážkou podbitou železnými hřeby (Baumgartner 1982). Druhý nález představuje dřevěná protéza levé holeně z rakouského Hemmabergu (6. století), která měla kovovou objímku uchycenou dvěma hřeby (Binder 2016). Třetím nálezem je dřevěno-bronzová protéza levé holeně z německého Griesheimu (7.-8. století), u níž bronz tvořil lůžko pro pahýl, které bylo vystlané kůží, zatímco směrem nahoru vybíhala dřevěná vidlice až po úroveň stehna, kde byla upevněna řemínky (Czarnetzki et al 1983: 91-92). Protézu dolní končetiny lze předpokládat také u muže ze švýcarské lokality Aesch (7. století), který žil zhruba 1-2 roky po amputaci (Cueni 2009: 115-118). Z tohoto výčtu je patrné, že každá protéza byla unikátní, a proto existovala variabilita tvarů i materiálů. Můžeme si povšimnout, že důležitá je kromě funkčnosti také pohodlnost a estetická kvalita protéz.

Co se týče ikonografie, nejstaršími doklady používání protéz dolních končetin jsou výjevy na římských vázách, z nichž nejstarší pochází ze 4. století př. n. l. (Binder 2016: 30; Sellegren 1982: 13). Další obrazové doklady máme až z vrcholného středověku, kdy se nezřídka objevují v iluminacích a mozaikách 12.-14. století. Zejména se jedná o výjevy z rukopisů, jako je Bible z Bury (Corpus Christi MS 002, 1v, 1135-1138, Anglie), Žaltář sv. Alžběty (Cividale del Friuli, Sign. Ms CXXXVII, 173r, 1201-1207, Itálie), Franko-vlámský antifonál (Ms. 44/Ludwig VI 5, f. 202, 1260–1270, Francie nebo Belgie), Artušovské romance (Beinecke MS 229, 257v, 1275-1300, Francie) a Saské zrcadlo (HAB Cod. Guelf. 3.1 Aug. 2°, 20v, 1350-1375, Německo), ale také mozaiky, jakou je např. mozaika z katedrály v Lescar (1120-1141, Francie). Nakolik lze z tohoto vzorku soudit, amputace nad koleny prakticky nevyužívají protézy a pacienti se pohybují pomocí holí, zatímco amputace pod kolenem bylo možné nahradit jednoduchou a tvarově uniformní nohou s okem na konci. Protézy se zdají být dřevěné nebo kovové a pahýl je zasunut do otvoru, který je na straně směřující k zemi vypolstrován. Stejný druh protéz (angl. bent-knee prosthesis) se užíval do poměrně nedávné doby a stále se doporučuje dětem v rozvojových zemích, ovšem jako dočasné a nouzové řešení, které způsobuje dystrofii svalu, a proto je potřeba po použití protézy sval důkladně procvičit (Werner 1987: 625). Nad protézy a hole můžeme ve středověké ikonografii nalézt řadu dřevěných chodítek a připevňovacích platforem, bez výstupků i s výstupky suplujícími končetinu, pro postižené leprou a obrnou (Hernigou 2014aHernigou 2014b).

Výběr amputovaných nohou a protéz středověku.

Zleva: mozaika z katedrály v Lescar (1120-1141, Francie), Bible z Bury (Corpus Christi MS 002, 1v, 1135-1138, Anglie), Žaltář sv. Alžběty (Cividale del Friuli, Sign. Ms CXXXVII, 173r, 1201-1207, Itálie), Franko-vlámský antifonál (Ms. 44/Ludwig VI 5, f. 202, 1260–1270, Francie nebo Belgie), Artušovské romance (Beinecke MS 229, 257v, 1275-1300, Francie), Saské zrcadlo (HAB Cod. Guelf. 3.1 Aug. 2°, 20v, 1350-1375, Německo).

Písemné zdroje jsou rovněž dobrými prameny. Nejvýraznějšími důkazy existence protéz tvoří charakteristická příjmí, která reflektují vzhled majitele. Ze severského prostředí známe příjmí viðleggr (“dřevěná noha”) a hned tři muže s příjmím tréfótr (“dřevěná noha”), kteří žili období 9.-13. století. Známe rovněž příjmí spýtuleggr, které se může vztahovat k dřevěné či tenké noze (Jónsson 1908: 220, 222). Staroseverština zná frázi ganga á tréfótum (“kráčet o dřevěných nohách”), která znamená tolik co “být na tom špatně” (Baetke 2006: 662). Příjmí vztahující se k používání dřevěných protéz známe rovněž ze střední horní němčiny: stelzære, stelzner, uf dir stelzen, râvôt (Keil 2012: 372).

Zřejmě nejlepší písemné zprávy o dřevěné protéze raného středověku obestírají Nora jménem Ǫnund, který žil na přelomu 9. a 10. století. Zatímco Kniha o záboru země (verze Sturlubók, kap. 161) hovoří pouze o tom, že Ǫnund “(…) bojoval proti králi Haraldovi v Hafrsfjordu a přišel zde o nohu. Poté odplul na Island a zabral zemi (…)”, Sága o Grettim (kap. 2-11) představuje barvitější popis – Ǫnund je vykreslen jako viking, který se náhodně dozvídá o námořní bitvě v Hafrsfjordu, a rozhoduje se jí zúčastnit. Muži krále Haralda mu utínají při špatném střehu takřka celou nohu pod kolenem, ale Ǫnunda zachraňují jeho spolubojovníci, kteří se odpojují z bitvy a prchají. “Ǫnund se uzdravil, ale celý svůj život chodil s dřevěnou nohou. Říkali mu proto, dokud žil, Ǫnund Dřevěná noha” (Sága o Grettim 2). Po zahojení rány se Ǫnund odebral na Hebridy, ale trpí psychickými problémy – je tichý, uvědomuje si svoji špatnou pohyblivost, chybí mu noha a opouští ho radost z boje, což svému příteli také prozrazuje. Přítel mu doporučuje, aby se usadil a našel si ženu, avšak otec, kterého společně požádají o ruku jeho dcery, se zdráhá provdat svou dceru za mrzáka bez nemovitostí. Je však ujištěn, že Ǫnund se může pohybovat bez obtíží a že má dostatek movitého majetku a dobrý původ, což Ǫnundovi zvedne sebevědomí a vydává se na další nájezdy. V následující bitvě mu přátelé postaví pod nohu špalek, aby se mohl také zapojit, a zbraň jeho oponenta se do špalku zasekne, čehož Ǫnund využije a protivníka porazí. Nato Ǫnund pluje do Irska, kde se věnuje dalším válečným akcím, a po zastávce na Hebridách, kde se žení, se následně vydává do Norska, kde se mstí uchvatitelům svého pozemku. Poté se vydává na Island, kde shromažďuje majetek a buduje rod. V době své smrti je považovaný za nejudatnějšího a nejzručnějšího člověka s protézou v kolektivním povědomí – “Na Islandě nežil nikdy muž o jedné noze, který by byl nad něho odvážnější a zručnější” (Sága o Grettim 11). Dalším Islanďanem s protézou, o kterém víme ze Ságy o lidech z Eyru (18), byl Þóri Dřevěná noha – byl údajně zasažen do stehna, avšak zranění přežil a po zbytek života chodil se dřevěnou nohou, přičemž se dodává, že měl manželství, ze kterého vzešlo potomstvo.

Ačkoli tyto příběhy mohou být upraveny orální a posléze literární tradicí, pro nás relevantní informace vyznívají realisticky. Třebaže bylo zřejmě běžné, že o postižené bylo pečováno doma (Sága o Grettim 4), někteří jedinci z dobrého rodu, kteří byly v kondici, pokračovali přes úpadek sebevědomí ve svém každodenním, náročném životě. V sázce bylo mnoho : pouze skrze riskantní podniky mohli nezadaní mladíci zvýšit své bohatství a status, a tím se uplatnit na sňatkovém trhu, založit rodinu a začít budovat svůj vlastní statek (Raffield et al. 2017). Na Ǫnundově příkladě můžeme pozorovat, že zásahy do spodní části nohou byly běžné. O protézách samotných se zdroje takřka nevyjadřují, víme však, že byly dřevěné.


Poděkování a věnování

Článek, který jsme zde předložili, byl konzultován s chirurgem a reenactorem Zbyňkem Buchtelou, kterému děkujeme za podnětné připomínky. Poděkování zaslouží také švédský reenactor Erik Hörnsten, který nás upozornil na zajímavý nález z varnhemského kláštera. Tento článek bychom rádi věnovali Vojtěchu Šlapákovi a Michaelu Kahnovi.


Bibliografie

Kniha o záboru země = Landnamabók I-III: Hauksbók, Sturlubók, Melabók. Ed. Finnur Jónsson, København 1900.

Sága o Grettim = Saga o Grettim. Přel. L. Heger, Praha 1957.

Sága o lidech z Eyru = Sága o lidech z Eyru. Přel. L. Heger. In: Staroislandské ságy, Praha 1965, 35–131.

Sága o Njálovi = Sága o Njálovi. Přel. L. Heger. In: Staroislandské ságy, Praha, 1965: 321–559.

Baetke, Walter (2006). Wörterbuch zur altnordischen Prosaliteratur, Greifswald, digitální verze.

Baumgartner, René (1982). Fußprothese aus einem Frühmittelalterlichen Grab aus Bonaduz – Kanton Graubünden/Schweiz. In: Medizinisch orthopädische Technik 102, 131-134.

Bennion, Elisabeth (1980). Antique Medical Instruments, Berkeley / Los Angeles.

Binder, M. – Eitler, J. – Deutschmann, J. – Ladstätter, S. – Glaser, F. – Fiedler, D. (2016). Prosthetics in antiquity – An early medieval wearer of a foot prosthesis (6th century AD) from Hemmaberg/Austria. In: International Journal of Paleopathology 12, 29-40.

Bogin, Barry – Varela-Silva, Maria Inês (2010). Leg Length, Body Proportion, and Health: A Review with a Note on Beauty. In: International Journal of Environmetal Research and Public Health, vol. 7 (3), 1047–1075.

Cueni, Andreas (2009). Die frühmittelalterlichen Menschen von Aesch (Anthropologische Untersuchungen). In: Hartmann, C. – Cueni, A. – Rast-Eicher, A. (eds.). Aesch: ein frühmittelalterliches Gräberfeld, Luzern, 83-126.

Czarnetzki, A. – Uhlig, C. – Wolf, R. (eds) (1983). Menschen des Frühen Mittelalters im Spiegel der Anthropologie und Medizin. Würtembergisches Landesmuseum, Stuttgart.

Claspe, Jon – Ramasamy, Arul (2013). Traumatic amputations. In: British Journal of Pain 7 (2), 67–73.

de Godoy, J. M. P. – Vasconcelos Ribeiro, J. – Andrioli Caracanhas, L. – de Fátima Guerreiro Godoy, M. (2010). Hospital infection after major amputations. In: Annals of Clinical Microbiology and Antimicrobials, 9:15.

Erdem, H. – Tetik, A. – Arun, O. – Besirbellioglu, B. A. – Coskun, O. – Eyigun, C. P. (2011). War and infection in the pre-antibiotic era: the Third Ottoman Army in 1915. In: Scandinavian Journal of Infectious Diseases 43, 690–695.

Finch, Jacky (2018). The complex aspects of experimental archaeology: the design of working models of two ancient Egyptian great toe prostheses. In: Draycott, Jane (ed.). Prostheses in Antiquity, London, 29-48.

Friedmann, Lawrence W. (1972). Amputation and Prostheses in Primitive Cultures. In: Bulletin of Prosthetics Research (BPR) 10-17: 105-138.

Frölich, Annette (2011). Medical Tools from the First Millennium – A New Recognition after Reinterpretation of Artifact Material. In: Boyé, Linda (ed.). Det 61. Internationale Sachsensymposion 2010, Haderslev, Danmark, Neumünster, 317-324.

Gennarelli, T. A. – Champion, H. R. – Sacco, W. J. – Copes, W. S. – Alves, W. M. (1989). Mortality of patients with head injury and extracranial injury treated in trauma centers. In: Journal of Trauma and Acute Care Surgery, vol. 29, 1193–1201.

Hernigou, Philippe (2014a). Crutch art painting in the middle age as orthopaedic heritage (Part I: the lepers, the poliomyelitis, the cripples). In: International Orthopaedics 38 (6), 1329–1335.

Hernigou, Philippe (2014b). Crutch art painting in the Middle Ages as orthopaedic heritage (part II: the peg leg, the bent-knee peg and the beggar). In: International Orthopaedics 38 (7), 1535–1542.

Holck, Per (2009). The Skeleton from the Gokstad Ship: New Evaluation of an Old Find. In: Norwegian Archaeological Review, 42:1, 40-49.

Janoušek, Jakub (2015). Četnost a možnosti řešení amputací dolních končetin. Univerzita Karlova v Praze : Fakulta tělesné výchovy a sportu. Bakalářská práce.

Jónsson, Finnur (1908). Tilnavne i den islandske oldlitteratur. In: Aarbøger for Nordisk Oldkyndighed og Historie 1907, Kjøbenhavn: 161–381.

Keil, Gundolf (2012). Heilkunde bei den Germanen. In: Beck, H. – Geuenich, D. – Steuer, H. (eds.). Altertumskunde – Altertumswissenschaft – Kulturwissenschaft: Erträge und Perspektiven nach 40 Jahren Reallexikon der Germanischen Altertumskunde, Berlin-Boston, 317–388.

Klaphake, S. – de Leur, K. – Mulder, P. G. H – Ho, G. H. – de Groot, H. G. – Veen, E. J. – Verhagen, H. J. M – van der Laan, L. (2017). Mortality after major amputation in elderly patients with critical limb ischemia. In: Clinical Interventions in Aging 12, 1985-1992.

Matzke, Johann Keller Wheelock (2011). Armed and Educated: Determining the Identity of the Medieval Combatant, University of Exeter.

Mays, Simon A. (1996). Healed limb amputations in human osteoarchaeology and their causes: a case study from Ipswich, UK. In: International Journal of Osteoarchaeology 6, 101–113.

Meri, Josef W. (2005). Medieval Islamic Civilization: An Encyclopedia, New York – London.

Mitchell, P. D. (2004). Evidence for elective surgery in the Frankish states of the near east in the crusader period (12th-13th centuries). In: Jankrift, K. P. – Steger, F. (eds.). Gesundheit–Krankheit: Kulturtransfer Medizinischen Wissens von der Spätantike bis in die Frühe Neuzeit, Cologne, 121-138.

Pavlačková, Markéta (2012). Kvalita života pacientů po amputaci na dolní končetině. Masarykova univerzita : Lékařská fakulta. Bakalářská práce.

Price, Neil S. (2002). The Viking Way: Religion and War in Late Iron Age Scandinavia, Uppsala.

Rau, B. – Bonvin, F. – de Bie, R. (2007). Short-term effect of physiotherapy rehabilitation on functional performance of lower limb amputees. In: Prosthetics and Orthotics International 31 (3), 258 – 270.

Raffield, B. – Price, N. – Collard, M. (2017). Male-biased operational sex ratios and the Viking phenomenon : an evolutionary anthropological perspective on Late Iron Age Scandinavian raiding. In: Evolution and Human Behavior, vol. 38, no.3, 315–324.

Rhyne, C.E. – Templer, D.I. – Brown, L.G. – Peters, N.B. (1995). Dimensions of suicide: perceptions of lethality, time, and agony. In: Suicide & Life-Threatening Behavior 25(3): 373-380.

Runcie, Harriet (2015). Infection in a Pre-Antibiotic Era. In: Journal of Infectious Diseases & Preventive Medicine 3 (2), 125.

Sahu, A. – Sagar, R. – Sarkar, S. – Sagar, S. (2016). Psychological effects of amputation: A review of studies from India. In: Industrial psychiatry journal 25 (1), 4-10.

Sellegren, Kim R. (1982). An Early History of Lower Limb Amputations and Prostheses. In: Iowa Orthopedic Journal 2, 13–27.

Sexton, John P. (2010). Difference and Disability: On the Logic of Naming in the Icelandic Sagas. In: Eyler, Joshua R. (ed.). Disability in the Middle Ages: Reconsiderations and Reverberations, London-Burlington, 149-163.

Smith, Philip W. – Watkins, Kristin – Hewlett, Angela (2012). Infection control through the ages. In: American Journal of Infection Control 40, 35-42.

Štefan, Ivo – Stránská, Petra – Vondrová, Hana (2016). The archaeology of early medieval violence: the mass grave at Budeč, Czech Republic. Antiquity, 90, s. 759-776.

Thordeman, Bengt (1939). Armour from the Battle of Wisby: 1361. Vol. 1 – Text, Stockholm.

Van Cant, Marit (2018). Surviving Amputations: A Case of a Late-Medieval Femoral Amputation in the Rural Community of Moorsel (Belgium). In: Turner, W. J. – Lee, Ch. (eds). Trauma in Medieval Society, Leiden, 180–214.

van der Mark, Wiel (2016). A Broken Leg in the Year 1350: Treatment and Prognosis. In: EXARC Journal, 2016/2.

Vlasatý, Tomáš (2017). „Ryji runy léčby“ : Runové modlitby a léčitelství starého Severu. In: Projekt Forlǫg : Reenactment a věda.
Dostupné z: http://sagy.vikingove.cz/ryji-runy-lecby/

Werner, David (1987). Disabled Village Children. A Guide for Community Health Workers, Rehabilitation Workers, and Families, Palo Alto.

Westphalen, Petra (2002). Die Eisenfunde von Haithabu, Die Ausgrabungen in Haithabu 10, Neumünster.

Williams, Mary Wilhelmine (1920). Social Scandinavia in the Viking age, New York.

Woosnam-Savage, Robert C. – DeVries, Kelly (2015). Battle Trauma in Medieval Warfare: Wounds, Weapons and Armor. In: Tracy, Larissa – DeVries, Kelly (eds). Wounds and Wound Repair in Medieval Culture, Leiden, 27–56.

Jakobsson’s Hilt Typology

Jan Petersen’s revolutionary thesis De Norske Vikingesverd (1919) became a basis for many authors, who attempted to adjust or complete the work, or replace it with a typology of their own. Such an example is Mikael Jakobsson, who chose a different approach in his thesis Krigarideologi och vikingatida svärdstypologi (Stockholm, 1992), which we analyse in the text below.

kniha

The book Krigarideologi och vikingatida svärdstypologi [Warrior ideology and typology of Viking Age swords], which is a published doctoral thesis of the author, is a reputable and very thorough work. Personally, I see its main benefit in advanced analysis using data collected from majority of Europe. His goal is not a revision of Petersen’s hilt typology – with which he basically agrees – but a categorisation of broader hilt groups based on similarities in construction. Jakobsson labels these categories as “design principles”. While Petersen worked with three principles (a group with multi-lobed pommel, a group with simplified pommel, a group of unclassifiable types), Jakobsson expanded the list to six, respectively seven types:

  1. Triangle pommel
  2. Three-lobed pommel
  3. Five or more-lobed pommel
  4. Absenting pommel
  5. Curved guard
  6. Single-pieced pommel
  7. Unclassifiable

 

Design principle 1 : triangular pommel

Jakobsson’s triangular pommel corresponds to Petersen’s main sword types A, B, C, H and I, plus his special types 3, 6, 8 and 15. The swords using this design principle comprise a substantial part of swords finds portfolio – at least 884 pieces (48%) according to Jakobsson. This equals to 529 swords in Norway (60%), 147 in Sweden (17%), 81 in Finland (9%), 4 in Denmark (0,5%), 94 in Western Europe (11%) and 29 in Eastern Europe (3%). Their origin can be traced to continental swords with pyramid-shaped pommels. This principle emerged in Scandinavia sometime between the half and end of 8th century under the influence of Carolingian swords and remained there until the end of 10th century.

princip1-typyPetersen’s sword types corresponding with Jakobsson‘s design principle 1.

princip1-rozsireniDistribution of design principle 1 pommels, areas of archaeological finds marked with black.

Design principle 2 : three-lobed pommel

The design principle 2 includes variants of type A, types D, E, L, Mannheim, Mannheim/Speyer, R, S, T, U V and Z, older variant of type X and special types 1, 2, 6, 13, 14 and 19. This principle is present at least on 492 swords (26%). This corresponds with 188 swords in Norway (37%), 58 in Sweden (12%), 43 in Finland (9%), 18 in Denmark (4%), 75 in Western Europe (15%) and 110 in Eastern Europe (23%). The origin can be traced to Merovingian swords, with the three-lobed pommel being based on a pommel with animal heads on the sides. This principle appeared in Scandinavia at the end of 8th century under the influence of Early-Carolingian swords, and supported by English influence in 9th century, it remained there until the beginning of 11th century.

princip2-typyPetersen’s sword types corresponding with Jakobsson‘s design principle 2.

princip1-rozsireni
Distribution of design principle 2 pommels, areas of archaeological finds marked with black.

Design principle 3 : five and more-lobed pommel

Jakobsson’s design principle 3 includes Petersen’s sword types O, K and the five-lobed variant of type S. This principle is the least numerous with only over 88 swords (5%) and is tighly connected to the design principle 2. In Norway, there are 44 swords (49%), 4 in Sweden (5%), none in Finland, 1 in Denmark (1%), 26 in Western Europe (30%) and 13 in Eastern Europe (15%). Like design principle 2, also the design principle 3 is based on Merovingian pommels with animal heads on pommel sides. It arrived in Scandinavia at the beginning of 9th century and remained until the half of 10th century. The topic five and more-lobed pommels is vaguely analyzed, as there are more than fifty cast bronze pommels that are not included.

princip3-typyPetersen’s sword types corresponding with Jakobsson‘s design principle 3.

princip3-rozsireni
Distribution of design principle 3 pommels, areas of archaeological finds marked with black.

Design principle 4 : absenting pommel

With its distinctive upper guard instead of a traditional pommel, design principle 4 includes main types M, P, Q, Y, Æ and special types 5, 17 and 18. We know of at least 712 swords (39%) belonging to this design principle. It is notable that the type M alone is the most numerous of all sword types with more than 432 finds (17%). As for the principle 4, we know of 631 swords in Norway (89%), 23 in Sweden (3%), 14 in Finland (2%), 2 in Denmark (0,3%), 28 in Western Europe (4%) and 14 in Eastern Europe (2%). Design principle 4 was in use from 9th century to sometime during 11th century.

princip4-typyPetersen’s sword types corresponding with Jakobsson‘s design principle 4.

princip4-rozsireni
Distribution of design principle 3, areas of archaeological finds marked with black.

Design principle 5 : curved guard

This design principle of swords consists of main type L, Q, T, Y, Z and Æ, variants of types O, K and X, plus special types 7, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18 and 19. The number of swords belonging to design principle 5 is somewhere over 482 pieces (26%). In Norway, we know of 312 finds (71%), 32 in Sweden (7%), 23 in Finland (5%), 3 at maximum in Denmark (1%), 45 in Western Europe (10%) and 70 in Eastern Europe (6%). Design principle 5 was in use during the same period as design principle 4 – from the beginning of 9th century till the end of 11th century.

princip5-typyPetersen’s sword types corresponding with Jakobsson‘s design principle 5.

princip5-rozsireni
Distribution of design principle 5, areas of archaeological finds marked with black.

Design principle 6 : single-pieced pommel

The distinguishing attribute for design principle 6, containing sword types X and W, is a single-pieced pommel with absenting upper guard. There are over 211 swords (11%) of this kind, with 69 found in Norway (33%), 25 in Sweden (12%), 46 in Finland (22%), 8 in Denmark (4%), 51 in Western Europe (24%) and 12 in Eastern Europe (6%). While Jakobsson suggested design principle 6 coming into use at the end of 9th century or the beginning of 10th century, Jiří Košta proved on a set of type X swords from Moravia area of Mikulčice that this principle could had been in use in Central Europe as early as 9th century. This principle turned out to be dominant and substantial for following medieval weapons.

princip6-typyPetersen’s sword types corresponding with Jakobsson‘s design principle 5.

princip6-rozsireni
Distribution of design principle 6, areas of archaeological finds marked with black.

Unclassifiable

Out of the total of 1900 included swords, as much as 97% can be classified into one or more of the previous six design principles. The remaining 3% (around 60 swords) cannot be categorised as such, because they are either a combination of some of two principles or represent a completely standalone category.

nezaraditelnePetersen’s sword types corresponding with Jakobsson‘s unclassifiable category.


As the research shows, it is possible to see a certain evolution of the individual sword types, with a new type of sword per circa each new generation. On contrary, if we categorise the swords by Jakobsson’s design principles – thus working a wider group of sword types based on clearly defined attributes – the length of usage increases to over 100 years, in some cases even up to 200-250 years, i.e. 6-8 generations. Such a prolonged usage of similar manufacturing process undoubtedly must have a deeper meaning. At least in 10th century, all principles were used simultaneously, so it is not possible to connect different manufacturing processes with different chronology. The same goes with geographical distribution, as all principles were used in the similar area, and with practical features – design principle 1 has no connection between the pommel type and blade type, so we can come across both single- and two-edged swords. Jakobsson therefore suggests the popularity of six different principles being tied to something else entirely – to different strategies for reproducing a symbolical value tied to a physical form.

The symbolical value of swords goes hand to hand with their ownership and usage. The fact that the sword principles emerged in such volatile times filled with war, and that the swords are often found in graves suggests that their owners were perceived as sovereigns and combat capable figures. A sword is therefore a multi-layered expression of independence and legitimate membership of higher society (see The sword biography). This value was undoubtedly reflected by the visage of the sword, with some types or even whole principles being more suitable for such a presentation than others. Individual principles might have held a meaning we are not able to grasp anymore nowadays.

More traditional constructions (most of the principle 1, 2 and 3 swords) consist of heavier, usually decorated multi-pieced pommels and short guards, which are good especially for footed combat. In contrast to this conservative construction with deep roots in previous generations of Germanic weapons, there are lighter, less decorated swords with simple pommels, longer guards and better usage in mounted combat (principle 6, especially the type X). Their owners could had expressed their allegiance to continental aristocracy and fashion which the local elite promoted. This could also be the case of principle 5, which seems to be of Anglo-Saxon origin, with its features being widely replicated at least in Viking-Age Scandinavia. Principle 4 might had been more suitable for a part of population wishing to show their identity of sword owners but could not afford the previously mentioned principles. That is why Petersen‘s type M is the most common sword of the Early Middle-Ages (see Petersens type M swords).

Last but not least, it is important to mention that the weapon distribution throughout Scandinavia was not uniform, and that there were notable differences between rich centres and less important peripheries. In closed communities, such as Iceland and some Scandinavian regions, the weapons were widespread among the population, but swords were held by only the richest and in small numbers. In major centres such as Uppland, Central Sweden (also known as society dividing model), the weapons were mainly owned by warrior nobility, circa in ratio 14 Petersen’s types per 100 swords. In this societal model, the presence and absence of weapons among the wider population is crucial. In contrast to this model stand the peripheries settled by seldom stratified population attempting to demonstrate its power. Such a demonstration usually takes form of cumulation of vast number of weapons (also known as society uniting model), which is based on quantity and quality. This can be seen both in number of swords found in Norway, counting over several thousands, and relatively high diversity of sword types, being 10-13 Petersen‘s types per 100 swords in some areas. The vacuum created by absence of a central ruler is filled by number of lesser chieftains who represent their sovereignty by possession of exclusive equipment. Such a type of society, which uses more swords, preserves this trend and puts even more swords into circulation. Other reasons for the creation of Norwegian model could be interpreted by well-equipped militia, but also in other ways. According to Jakobsson, all the models are as a matter of fact a reflection of the same reality.

Jakobsson‘s work is a semiotic approach to material culture. He attempts to outline a complex relation between a symbol and a context and does not resort only to a single explanation. His approach to the subject is by both analysing the sword categories from broader historical perspective and by considering each of the specific weapons by the local and minor relevance. Despite its useful analyses and extensive appendixes, the book does not receive enough attention after more than 25 years. Nevetherless, Jakobsson‘s research should be revised in order to confirm or disprove its up-to-dateness.

Tomáš Vlasatý
Slaný, Bohemia, 2nd May 2019

Origins of “kolovrat” symbol

Over more than a decade, during which I have been intensively interested in studying the Early Middle Ages, I have sought to uncover disinformations and set straight mystifications that has been created and used by both laymen and professional public. After all, one of the main points of creating this website was to set up a platform, which would set partial and often controversial topics straight, putting them into the proper context. This article is no different, very possibly impacting a wide audience. Today, we will talk about Slavs, neopaganism, nationalism, metal music and a symbol known as “kolovrat”.


A symbol commonly known as “kolovrat” nowadays.


Modern usage of “kolovrat”

Quite a major part of nowadays nationalists, neopagans and reenactors can often be seen wearing a multi-armed whirling symbol – most often in the form of a tattoo, worn as a necklace, printed on a shirt, music album or military patch, or as a shield painting. This symbol, resembling swastika, is known among its users as “kolovrat”. The neopagans recognize many of these whirling symbols, each having its own name and meaning (click for an example). For the sake of simplicity, we will only focus on more-than-four-arms variants with heel and arbitrary direction of rotation. We must keep in mind though that terminology is not unified and thus we can often come across an argument that “kolovrat” is a Slavic version of swastika.

The interpretation of the eight-armed “kolovrat” is often provided to a modern day neopagan by websites profiting from the promotion of the symbol, such as themed e-shops. On these, “kolovrat” is interpreted as “a panslavic pagan symbol of the Sun” (Wulflund.com), “an ancient sacred symbol of our Slavic ancestors” (sperkyluneta.cz), “a symbol of reasonable man, which symbolises the Day star” (symboleswiata.pl) or as a symbol representing the “circle of life, victory of winter over summer, victory of night over day, alternating ruling of Morena and Vesna” (www.valkiria.sk). This ancient symbol is also said to be connected to the gods of Slavic pantheon and prosperity. Print literature which could be used for citation of the origin and meaning is almost non-existent, and the known titles are very general and provide no sources (eg. Kushnir 2014Kushnir 2016: 67). It therefore seems that “kolovrat” was established as the main symbol of Slavic faith in times when Neopaganism was forming in eastern Europe, and there was a demand for unifying symbol based on Slavic material culture (Pilkington – Popov 2009: 282). Despite the fact, both the symbolism and offshoots of the Neopagan movement (of which we register several hundreds) remain ununified and fragmented, as their members are being recruited from those interested in esoterism, folklore, LARP, history and metal music, who rarely find a common ground. This process can be dated to last two decades of 20th century and can be tied directly to a Russian dissident, neopagan and extremist Alexei “Dobroslav” Dobrovolsky. In the Czech Republic, the symbol and term “kolovrat” started to appear around the end of 20th century, and more increasingly after the year 2000 thanks to the expansion of the internet network.

By those means the symbol found its way to the now-spreading re-enactment scene, which came to adopt it for use during its performance. Part of neopagan movement was and partially still is a bearer of nationalistic and right-wing ideologies to a point. After the fall of Soviet Union, various political and paramilitary units started to appear in Eastern Europe, who found neopagan ideology, symbolism and terminology attractive and adopted their more or less overturned form. This way, “kolovrat” became an important symbol among extremist groups. One of the most famous promoters of the symbol is Russian National Unity (see here), which explicitly avows to Nazism, but tries to bear the impression of Russian origin at the same time, through the usage of Slavic history, orthodoxy and mystic symbolism (Jackson 1999: 36; Shenfield 2001: chap. 5). Estonian branch of Russian National Unity also has the name “Kolovrat” and used to publish a same-named magazine. Symbolism based on “kolovrat” can also be seen nowadays at both fighting sides of the Eastern Ukraine conflict (especially the Rusič battalion); for more details I suggest the article by Matouš Vencálek (Vencálek 2018). To its wearer, “kolovrat” represents a symbol which provides God’s protection and strength in battle, and demoralizes the enemy, who is seen in both religious and political opponents (Jackson 1999: 36). It should be noted that the symbol is absent in Czech literature mapping extremist symbols (Mareš 2006), as compared to our neighbour Slovakia (see here). On the other hand, “kolovrat” is present in the expert opinions that were written for trials with Czech radical extremists (see here). Conservative neopagans see the usage of this symbol as a “fashion abuse”.

It is understandable that the symbol appears in many product descriptions, which target this narrowly focused, yet greatly fragmented community, which at best totals between tens and hundreds thousands of people living in Slavic countries. “Kolovrat” can be found on shirts, caps, patches, flags, in the form of amulets, earrings or bracelets, but also used by various music interprets: black metal (eg. 1389, Děti Noci, Devilgasm), folk metal (eg. Apraxia, Arkona, Obereg, Żywiołak), thrash metal (eg. Коловрат, Strzyga), folk (eg. Jar, Perciwal, Tomáš Kočko), neo-folk (eg. Parzival, Slavogorje), hard rock (Rune) and others.

The truly important question we ought to ask is how accurate the original attempts to reconstruct the original pre-Christian religion were, that is whether the modern use of “kolovrat” reflects the use throughout the history. This question shall be answered in the following chapters.


Usage of “kolovrat” throughout European history

The symbol we now call “kolovrat” has been appearing in European material culture throughout the past three millennia, but very sporadically. It is crucial to note that is it evidently a version of swastika, simply with more than four arms. During all the epochs, from which we know the occasional appearance of “kolovrat”, swastika was commonly used, in severely higher numbers. Swastika is being interpreted as “a symbol of movement, growth, eternity, rhythmical time-flow measured by the Sun, and a symbol which brings good luck and provides protection from evil” (Váňa 1973: 210; Váňa 1990: 186–187). Thanks to this universal meaning, swastika can be found all over the globe. Its doubling (in the form of “kolovrat”) can thus be interpreted as an increase in its power.

The eldest appearance of the symbol can be dated back to Ancient Greece, especially the so-called Geometrical art (900-700BC) applied in pottery industry. Such an example could be terracotta statuettes from Thebes provenience (eg. Boston 98.891Louvre CA 573) and amphoras with ears (Spanish National Archaeological Museum 19482National Museum in Prague H10 5914). All of these examples depict eight-armed left-rotating symbols.

Examples of Greek painted ceramics with “kolovrat”. Click here for higher definition..
Left: terracotta statuettes from Thebes provenience (
Boston 98.891Louvre CA 573) and amphoras with ears (Spanish National Archaeological Museum 19482, National Museum in Prague H10 5914).

Logically, one would expect the highest amount of these symbols in connection to Slavic culture, but the archaeological finds (or the lack thereof) do not support this claim. Unlike the four-armed swastikas, “kolovrat” is almost non-existent and can only be found on the bottom of ceramics from Czech Republic and Poland, rarely also on pendants or as a graffiti on Russian coins. They are also absent in such monumental works such as Paganism of the Ancient Slavs by B. A. Rybakov (Рыбаков 1987), and cannot even be found in major agglomerations where one would expect them most. As far as we know, in Czech Republic, “kolovrat” can only be found on two ceramic bottoms from Zabrušany and Bílina hillforts (Váňa 1973: Pic. 2: F7, Pic. 4: F4). A similar symbol, though lacking the arm-heels, can be found on ceramics from Stará Boleslav (Varadzin 2007: 76: 296). From Poland, we know of a five-armed right-rotating swastika from Kruszwice (Buko 2008: 384, Fig. 176) and six-armed left-rotating swastika from Hedeč (Kołos-Szafrańska 1962: 455, Rys. 4:1). From Russia, we know of six Early Middle Ages uses: one is a five-armed right-rotating symbol engraved into coin as graffiti (Багдасаров 2001: Рис. 87:6), we also know a seven-armed right-rotating bronze pendant from Vladimir (Рыбаков 1997: Табл. 92:16) and four depictions on shield-like pendants from Eastern Europe (Коршун 2012: 33-35; Новикова 1998: Рис. 2:13). 

In general, we can claim that there are dozens, if not hundreds of variants, among which the more-than-four-armed swastikas play but a marginal role. It is therefore not possible to regard “kolovrat” as “the most important Slavic symbol”. Such a conclusion is also deemed by authors of several blogs (see herehere a here). Similar multi-armed whiling motifs, which could be connected to doubled swastika, can be found in The Great Moravia and Přemyslid Bohemia (eg. Kouřil 2014: 418, Kat. nr. 333), in Scandinavia and Frankish Empire (see Duczko 1989), but also in Armenia (see here). From later Middle Age periods we know of no records, even though it is possible that this symbol might have appeared in some of the Orthodox icons we will take a look at later. While Kołos-Szafrańska (1962: 455, Rys. 4:1) claims that a six-armed left-rotating “kolovrat” was a part of an old Polish aristocratic coat-of-arms, she does not provide any specifics. Neither the old Czech clan of Kolowrats has the symbol in its coat-of-arms.



Early Middle Ages “kolovrats”.

From top left: The finds from Bílina and Zabrušany (Váňa 1973: Pic. 2: F7, Pic. 4: F4), Stará Boleslav (Varadzin 2007: 76: 296), Kruszwice (Buko 2008: 384, Fig. 176), Hedeč (Kołos-Szafrańska 1962: 455, Rys. 4:1), unknown Russian coin (Багдасаров 2001: Рис. 87:6), Vladimir (Рыбаков 1997: Табл. 92:16), Pereslavl Rayon (Коршун 2012: 34, B.3.05), Žukov (Новикова 1998: Рис. 2:13) and unknown locations (Коршун 2012: 33, 35, B.3.03, B.3.08)

The usage of “kolovrat” is often argumented by its appearance in Slavic folk culture, but this is a questionable claim at best. Let us take a look at key work often cited for the origins on “kolovrat” by its users. We are talking about Teka prasłowiańskich motywów architektonicznych (“Collection of Ancient Slavic architectonic motifs”) by Stanisław Jakubowski. The collection consists of 27 graphics depicting ancient buildings and monuments, which decoration is a supposed proof for “kolovrat” being an ancient symbol often used by Slavic nations. But if we undergo a more thorough research, we find out that “kolovrat” only appears in a single graphics. Jakubowski was a painter and graphic, who can be compared to Czech artist Jan Konůpek, with Jakubowski’s work only being an artistic expression, not a credible interpretation of the past. While he might have used the folk culture as a source of inspiration, his work cannot be considered a collection of folk research, thus making this work an irrelevant source.


Stanisław Jakubowski and his woodcut nr. 8 (Jakubowski 1923).

There is only very little true evidence of “kolovrat” being used in Slavic folk culture. Six- and eight-armed variants can be found on the 12th century Wang church tower , which was relocated from Norway to present-day Poland in 1841–1844. It is important to note though that the original church did not have these decorations; they were added by an architect F. W. Schiertz during the second construction (see documentation here a here). The reasons for using these specific symbols are not known.

The original church from 1841 and the reconstructed state.
Source: Drawings by F. W. Schiertz and Fr. Preller.

Eight-armed symbols similar to “kolovrat” are still used nowadays during traditional Easter eggs decoration, specifically during painting and crocheting. Whirling multi-armed motifs can also be found carved on wooden tools used for laundering and knocking fabric in 20th century. It is important to note that “kolovrat” and other whirling motifs are quite common in Orthodox iconography (eg. Багдасаров 2001: Рис. 75:2, 76:3, 79:7, 82:2, 93:1), thus failing our current assumption that they carry a reference to ancient Paganism. The usage by Orthodox church is partially abused by extremists and soldiers, who, as we have mentioned in previous chapter often, put themselves into the role of Orthodoxy protectors.

Russian “beaters” for laundry (called вальки). Source: http://sueverija.narod.ru/Muzei/Valek.htm.

Russian smoothener of laundered clothes (called рубель). Source: http://sueverija.narod.ru/Muzei/Rubel.htm.

Identical whirling discs which are sometimes also called “sun symbols” were found during architectonical expedition of V. P. Orfinsky and his colleagues to Karelia in 50s and 60s. Members of this expedition recored several structural and decorative details of the buildings by drawing. These reproductions of drawing and painting are now stored in The Kizhi Federal Museum of Cultural History and Architecture (see collection online).


Decoration of houses from Karelian villages of Lambiselga (Ламбисельга), Inžunavolok (Инжунаволок) and Veškelica (Вешкелица).

Six-armed “kolovrat” also became an emblem of the 67th Division of British Army during the World War I., which only proves the popularity of the symbol prior to World War II.


Etymological interpretation of “kolovrat”

In one of his discussion, Russian historian and theologian Roman Bagdasarov refuted the claim that the name “kolovrat” would have ever been used in Russia as a synonym for swastika (Багдасаров 2008). Elsewhere, he added that Russian folklore nomenclature knows several alternatives for the word swastika, which is most often being connected to Sun, wind, flames, hare, horses, horse legs, rings with fingers or the plants Camelina and Stipa (Багдасаров 2001). This diversity of meanings contradicts the idea that the term “kolovrat” might had been uniformly used by the Slavic nations in the past. For interest we can add that in Russian language, the term for swastika had often been presented in plural.

In order to make our research of origins of the symbol complete, here is the etymological interpretation of the term. It is clear that in the past, the term “kolovrat” had no meaning connected to decorative or magical symbol, in any Slavic language whatsoever:

Kolovrat, from *kolovortьkolo (“wheel”) a vortь (“wiggle, rotate in both directions”).

  • Description of natural phenomena:
    • “water whirl” (Трубачев 1983: 149)
    • “meander” (Трубачев 1983: 149)
    • “plant Euphorbia” (Electronic dictionary of Old Czech language)
  • Description of a tool of its circular axis-rotating part:
    • “wheel”, “shaft” (Urbańczyk 1960–1962: 320)
    • “spinning wheel”, “spindle”, “niddy-noddy”, “tap wrench” (Electronic dictionary of Old Czech language)
    • “press” (Electronic dictionary of Old Czech language), “wine press” (Gebauer 1916: 85)
    • “auglet”, “drill” (Трубачев 1983: 149)
    • “rope reel” (Трубачев 1983: 149)
    • “gate”, “door”, “door latch”, “turnstile”, “two-wing wicket” – therefore also “station on the way” and “fence around the village” (Трубачев 1983: 149)
    • “rotary part of cart” (Трубачев 1983: 149)
    • “windlass”, “pulley”, “winch”, “reel” (Electronic dictionary of Old Czech language)
    • “rack” (Трубачев 1983: 149)
    • “windmill shaft” (Трубачев 1983: 149)
    • “rotating mechanism for hanging a kettle over fireplace in shepherd’s hut” (Frolec – Vařeka 2007: 117)
    • “a wheel on musical instrument” (Electronic dictionary of Old Czech language)
    • “crossbow winch” (Electronic dictionary of Old Czech language)
    • “a type of fishing net” (Urbańczyk 1960–1962: 321)
  • Description of circular movement or change:
    • “circulation”, “circular movement”, “rotation” (Трубачев 1983: 149)
    • “turning point” (Трубачев 1983: 149)
    • “hard reversal” (Трубачев 1983: 149)
    • “cycle” (Трубачев 1983: 149)

Conclusion

This article shows that the “kolovrat” symbol is mere modification of swastika and only has been appearing much less throughout the history than it is attributed in present day. Also, the name itself is of modern origin. “Kolovrat” only gained on importance in the last decades of 20th century because of an attempt of Slavic Paganism reconstruction, where this symbol became a imaginary symbol of the movement. Nowadays, it is widely used by neopagans, reenactors, soldiers and companies targeting these groups with their marketing campaigns. A major part of this community has its own interpretation of the past with “kolovrat” playing its irreplaceable role, in which they deviate from scientific research and knowledge on purpose. In conclusion the whole phenomenon proves the ignorance of these groups towards official research and searching for true origins, while coming with alternatives to mass culture, increased extremism and syncretism of religious ideas in postmodern society.


Literature

Багдасаров, Роман (2001). Свастика: священный символ. Этнорелигиоведческие очерки, Москва : Белые Альвы. Available at: bagdasarovr.narod.ru/swastika.htm

Багдасаров, Роман (2008). “Свастика: благословение или проклятие”. “Цена Победы”. “Echo of Moscow”, 15 декабря 2008. Available at: https://echo.msk.ru/programs/victory/559590-echo/

Buko, Andrzej (2008). The Archaeology of Early Medieval Poland : Discoveries – Hypotheses – Interpretations, Leiden – Boston : Brill.

Duczko, Władysław (1989). Runde Silberblechanhänger mit punzierten Muster. In: Arwidsson, Greta. Birka II:3. Systematische Analysen der Gräberfunde. Stockholm : KVHAA, 8–18.

Electronic dictionary of Old Czech language. Praha, department of language development Czech Language Institute of the Czech Academy of Sciences, v. v. i., 2006–, available online: http://vokabular.ujc.cas.cz (data version 1.1.8, cited on 9. 12. 2018).

Frolec, Václav – Vařeka, Josef (2007). Lidová architektura, 2. updated edition, Praha: Grada.

Gebauer, Jan (1916). Slovník staročeský, II. díl, Praha: Česká akademie císaře Františka Josefa pro vědy, slovesnost a umění a Česká grafická společnost Unie.

Jackson, W. D. (1999). Fascism, Vigilantism, and the State: The Russian National Unity Movement. In: Problems of Post-Communism, 46(1), 34–42.

Jakubowski, Stanisław. Teka prasłowiańskich motywów architektonicznych, Krakow : Orbis, 1923.

Kołos-Szafrańska, Zoja (1962). Nowa próba interpretacji funkcji znaków na dnach wczesnośredniowiecznych naczyń słowiańskich. In: Światowit 24, 443–458.

Коршун В.Е. (2012). Языческие привески Древней Руси X–XIV веков. Выпуск I: Обереги, Москва : Группа ИскателИ.

Kouřil, Pavel (ed.) (2014). Velká Morava a počátky křesťanství, Brno : Archeologický ústav AV ČR.

Kushnir, Dmitriy (2014). Slavic Light Symbols, The Slavic Way Book 5, CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform.

Kushnir, Dmitriy (2016). The Source of Life: Slavic Heritage, The Slavic Way Book 16, CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform.

Lutovský, Michal (2001). Encyklopedie slovanské archeologie v Čechách, na Moravě a ve Slezsku, Praha : Libri.

Mareš, Miroslav (2006). Symboly používané extremisty na území ČR v současnosti : manuál pro Policii ČR, Praha : Ministerstvo vnitra.

Новикова, Г.Л. (1998). Щитообразные подвескииз Северной и Восточной Европы // Историческая археология. Традиции и перспективы, Москва, 165–172.

Pilkington, Hilary – Popov, Anton (2009). Understanding neo-paganism in Russia : Religion? Ideology? Philosophy? Fantasy? In: McKay, George et al. (eds.) Subcultures and new religious movements in Russia and east-central Europe. Cultural Identity Studies, Volume 15 . Oxford ; New York: Peter Lang, 253–304.

Рыбаков, Б. А. (1987). Язычество Древней Руси, Москва : Наука.

Рыбаков Б. А. (ред.) (1997). Древняя Русь. Быт и культура, Москва : Наука.

Shenfield, Stephen (2001). Russian Fascism: Traditions, Tendencies and Movements, London : Routledge.

Urbańczyk, Stanisław (red.) (1960–1962). Słownik staropolski, t. 3, I–K, Wrocław–Kraków–Warszawa.

Трубачев, О.Н. (ed.) ( 1983). Kolovortъ. In: Этимологический словарь славянских языков, Выпуск 10. Москва: Наука, 149.

Váňa, Zdeněk (1973). Značky na keramice ze slovanských hradišť v Zabrušanech a v Bílině, okr. Teplice. In: Archeologické rozhledy 25, 196–217.

Váňa, Zdeněk (1990). Svět slovanských bohů a démonů, Praha : Panorama.

Varadzin, Ladislav (2007). Značky na dnech keramických nádob ze Staré Boleslavi / Bodenmarken auf den Keramikgefäßen aus Stará Boleslav. In: Archeologické rozhledy 59, 53–79.

Vencálek, Matouš (2018). Kříž, půlměsíc, kolovrat a kalašnikov: O roli náboženství v ukrajinské válce : Deník Referendum. Available at : http://denikreferendum.cz/clanek/27403-kriz-pulmesic-kolovrat-a-kalasnikov-o-roli-nabozenstvi-v-ukrajinske-valce

 

Origins of the “vegvísir” symbol

After publishing the very successful article regarding origins of the “kolovrat” symbol, I was requested to write a similar article about a symbol, which came to be known as “vegvísir” (literally “The pointer of the way”, “Wayfinder”) among those interested in Norse mythology. In this case, the situation is much simpler in comparison to other symbols. In the following article, we will take a look at various nowadays interpretations of the symbol, as well as its true origin.

Development of depictions of the “vegvísir” from 19th century till today.
Source: Foster 2013 – 2015.


Modern concept of “vegvísir”

Nowadays, “vegvísir” is famous among neo-pagans, musicians, reenactors and especially fans of TV series and other mass-production revolving around the Viking Age. We cannot omit its use in clothing industry, also often seen as a jewellery or tattoo. Reenactors tend to use it as shield decoration or costume embroidery. Among this inconsistent group of people, it is often accepted for “vegvísir” to be “a Germanic and Viking ancient magical rune symbol, which function was that of a compass and was supposed to protect the Viking warriors during seafaring, providing guidance and protection from Gods”. Such an interpretation can only be found in popular literature though, and in romantic fiction created in the past 30 years.


Vegvísir“ tattoo. Source: http://nextluxury.com/.


The origin of “vegvísir“

The symbol that we call “vegvísir” can be found in three Icelandic grimoires from the 19th century. The first and most important one of them – the Huld manuscript (signature ÍB 383 4to) – was composed by Geir Vigfússon (1813-1880) in Akureyri in 1860. The manuscript consists of 27 paper lists contains 30 magical symbols in total. The “vegvísir” is depicted at the page 60 (27r) and is marked with numbers XXVII and XXIX. It is complemented by another, further unspecified symbol and a following note (Foster 2015: 10):

Beri maður stafi þessa á sér villist maður ekki í hríðum né vondu veðri þó ókunnugur sé.”

“Carry this sign with you and you will not get lost in storms or bad weather, even though in unfamiliar surrounds.”

Among other very similar symbols which can be found in the Huld manuscript belong to the “Solomon’s sigil” (Salómons Insigli; nr. XXI) and “Sign against a thief” (Þjófastafur; nr. XXVIII).

The second grimoire known as “Book of spells” (Galdrakver) survived in a manuscript with designation Lbs 2917 a 4to. It was written by Olgeir Geirsson (1842-1880) in Akureyri during the years 1868-1869. The manuscript contains 58 pages, with “vegvísir” depicted on page 27 as a symbol nr. 27. It is accompanied by a text partially written in Latin, partially in runes:

Beri maður þennan staf á sér mun maður trauðla villast í hríð eða verða úti og eins rata ókunnugur.

“Carry this sign with you and you will not get lost in storms or die of cold bad weather, and will easily find his way from the unknown.”

Among other very similar symbols which can be found in the Huld manuscript belong to the “Solomon’s sigil” (Salómons Insigli; nr. XXI) and “Sign against a thief” (Þjófastafur; nr. XXVIII).

The third grimoire is yet another “Book of spells” (Galdrakver), this time preserved in a manuscript with designation Lbs 4627 8vo. While the author, place and time of creation are unknown, we are certain that it was written in 19th century in the Eyjafjord area, which again is close to Akureyri. The manuscript consists of 32 pages and “vegvísir” is depicted on page 17v. Within the manuscript, we can also find more similar symbols than just the “Solomon’s sigil” and “Mark against a thief”. The text accompanying this symbol is rather unique, and the following translation is the very first attempt since the exploration of the manuscript in 1993. From the text it is clear the functionality of the symbol was conditioned by true Christian faith:

At maður villist ekki : geim þennan staf undir þinni vinstri hendi, hann heitir Vegvísir og mun hann duga þér, hefir þú trú á honum – ef guði villt trúa i Jesu nafni – þýðing þessa stafs er falinn i þessum orðum að þú ei i (…) forgangir. Guð gefi mér til lukku og blessunar i Jesu nafni.”

“To avoid getting lost: keep this sign under your left arm, its name is Vegvísir and it will serve you if you believe in it – if you believe in God in the name of Jesus – the meaning of this sign is hidden in these words, so you may not perish. May God give me luck and blessing in the name of Jesus.”

 

Symbols from manuscripts ÍB 383 4to (27r), Lbs 2917 a 4to (27), Lbs 4627 8vo 17v).

Along with other symbols, the “vegvísir” came to Iceland most likely from England, where star-shaped symbols can be tracked as early as 15th century, such as “The Solomon’s testament” (Harley MS 5596, 31r). The original symbols had their meaning in Christian mysticism. A more thorough research might confirm the use of sigil magic even in earlier periods.

The first literature containing the Icelandic version of “vegvísir” symbol along with translation to German was most likely an article by Ólaf Davíðsson on Icelandic magical marks and books from 1903 (Davíðsson 1903: 278, Pl. V). The second time the symbol appeared in literature was in 1940 with Eggertson’s book about magic (Eggertson 1940: column 49; Eggertson 2015: 126). It is often incorrectly believed that “vegvísir” is also depicted in “The Book of spells” (Galdrabók). This mystification appeared at the end of 1980s, when Stephen Flowers publicised his paper The Galdrabók: An Icelandic Grimoire, in which the “vegvísir” does indeed appear (on page 88), but only in a side note on Icelandic grimoires. So how comes the symbol is so popular these days?

We believe the author Stephen Flowers played the main part in propagation of the symbol, thanks to the intense promotion of his paper during the beginning era of the Internet. That was in times of growing interest in Old Norse culture and emerging re-enactment community. Those interested in the topic, arguably due to lack of better resources than on purpose, based their research on the best available book with symbols that had a certain feel of authenticity due to being based on Icelandic origin. With its increasing popularity, the “vegvísir” also became an attractive article for online shops targeting this particular market, as well as for Icelandic tourist shops (see Tourism on Iceland), which still promote the “vegvísir” as an “authentic Viking symbol” due to commercial reasons. Another notable promoter of the symbol was the Icelandic singer Björk, who had it tattooed in 1982 and began to describe it as “an ancient Viking symbol, which seafarers painted with coal on their foreheads to find the correct way” since 1990s (gudmundsdottirbjork.blogspot.com). This caused “vegvísir” to become a part of tattoo artists’s portfolios, and at the moment the two mentioned influences intersected, the symbol became one of the most often tattooed motives in the neo-pagan, musical, re-enactment and Old Norse interest communities.

It is important to note that nowadays the circular variants, sometimes accompanied by rune alphabet, are the most used, although the original versions were of squarish shape and are without any runes.


Conclusion

The symbol known as “vegvísir” is Icelandic folk feature borrowed from continental occult magic “Solomon’s testament”. It is about 160 years old and its use is limited to the 2nd half of 19th century in an Icelandic city of Akureyri. The only literary sources we have from the Icelandic tradition are few mentions in three manuscripts, which are based on each other. The “vegvísir” is not a symbol used or originating in the Viking Age, and due to the 800 years gap should not be connected to it. The original Icelandic “vegvísir” is of square shape, with the circular variants emerging in the 20th century. Its current popularity is tied to the spread of the Internet and strong promotion in an on-line medium, that is easily accessible by the current users of the symbol.

I would love to express my thanks to my friends who inspired me towards composing this article, as well as those who provided me with the much-needed advice. My gratitude goes to Václav Maňha for the initial idea, to Marianne Guckelsberger for corrections on the Icelandic text and to René Dieken for providing me with various English sources.


Literature

Davíðsson, Ólafur (1903). Isländische Zauberzeichen und Zauberbücher. In: Zeitschrift des Vereins für Volkskunde 13, p. 150-167, 267-279, pls. III-VIII.

Eggertson, Jochum M. (1940). Galdraskræða Skugga, Reykjavík : Jólagjöfin.

Eggertsson, Jochum M. (2015). Sorcerer’s Screed : The Icelandic Book of Magic Spells, Reykjavík : Lesstofan.

Flowers, Stephen (1989). The Galdrabók: An Icelandic Grimoire, York Beach, Me. : S. Weiser.

Foster, Justin (2013 – 2015). Vegvísir (Path Guide). In: Galdrastafir: Icelandic Magical Staves. Available at:
http://users.on.net/~starbase/galdrastafir/vegvisir.htm

Foster, Justin (2015). The Huld Manuscript – ÍB 383 4to : A modern transcription, decryption and translation. Available at:
https://www.academia.edu/13008560/Huld_Manuscript_of_Galdrastafir_Witchcraft_Magic_Symbols_and_Runes_-_English_Translation

Scandinavian cloak pins with miniature weathervanes

 

During my research work, I have long been coming across an unusual type of artefacts, which are being described as miniature weathervanes (Swedish: miniatyrflöjel, miniflöjel, German: Miniaturwetterfahne). After many years, I have decided to take a deep look into these interesting objects and provide the readers with thorough analysis, comments and further references.


Finds description

At the moment, I am aware of eight more or less uniform miniature weathervanes, originating from seven localities. Let us take a detailed look at each of them:

  • Svarta jorden, Birka, Sweden
    At the end of the 19th century, one miniature weathervane was found in the Black Earth (located on Björko) during the excavations led by archaeologist Hjalmar Stolpe. It is 45 mm long and 35 mm wide (Salin 1921: 3, Fig. 4; Sörling 2018: 59). The material is gilded bronze (Lamm 2002: 36, Bild 4a). Currently, the item is stored in The Swedish History Museum under the catalogue number 5208:188; the on-line version of the catalogue also mentions a presence of 85 mm long pole (stång).

    Literature: Salin 1921; Ekberg 2002; Lamm 2002; Lamm 2003; Lamm 2004; Sörling 2018; Thunmark-Nylén 2006; catalogue SHM.

The miniature weathervane from Birka. Source: Salin 1921: Fig. 4; catalogue SHM.

  • Tingsgården, Rangsby, Saltvik, Ålandy
    Most likely in 1881 in Tingsgården, a barrow was found on the land of Ålandian landlord Robert Mattsson, whene he took it apart to use the materials for landscaping. Inside of the barrow, he found a wooden riveted coffin with remnants of coal, bones and an iron object. An archaeological research was conducted in the summer of 1903 by Björn Cederhvarf from The National Museum of Finland, who documented the find and transported it to the museum in Helsinki. The landlord’s son made yet another discovery in the barrow’s ground – a damaged bronze item with stylised animal ornament – a miniature weathervane which was 52 mm long, 37,5 mm wide and weighed 17,6 grams. To this day, the object is stored in The National Museum of Finland, designated by inventory number 4282:13. The Åland Museum only displays a very successful replica (Salin 1921: 20, Fig. 21; Lamm 2002: Bild 4c; Lamm 2004).

    Literature
    : Salin 1921; Ekberg 2002; Lamm 2002; Lamm 2003; Lamm 2004; Thunmark-Nylén 2006.


A miniature weathervane from Tingsgården. Source: Lamm 2002: Bild 4c; Lamm 2004: Fig. 1.

  • Gropstad, Syrholen, Dala-Floda, Dalarna, Sweden
    Supposedly in 1971, a highly damaged cremation burial was uncovered near Gropstad at Dala-Floda, containing only two fragmentary casts of miniature weathervanes (Frykberg 1977: 25-30). Both were made of bronze and vary in shape, level of conservation and decoration. One of them does not retain pole sockets, has more significant tassels and is of Borre design. The other has pole sockets, but lacks the tassels – instead, it has perforation, which could had been used for tassel attachment – and is decorated with simple concentric circles. Currently, the weathervanes are stored in Dalarnas Museum in Falun, Sweden.

    Literature: Frykberg 1977; Ekberg 2002; Lamm 2002; Lamm 2003; Lamm 2004; Thunmark-Nylén 2006.


Gropstad weathervanes. Source: Lamm 2002: Bild 4e-f.

  • Häffinds, Burs, Bandlunde, Gotland
    Another miniature weathervane was found during excavation of a Viking age marketplace near Häffinds on the eastern coast of Gotland (Thunmark-Nylén 2006: 366-367, Abb. III:40:7:I). The excavation was then led by Göran Burenhult from the Stockholm University and the weathervane was the most interesting item found during the work. The object is made of bronze, measures 53 mm × 42 mm (Thunmark-Nylén 2000: 92) or 54 mm × 43 mm (Lamm 2002: 39, Bild 4g; Lamm 2003: 60). It weighs 26 grams (Lamm 2002: 39). During that time, this particular weathervane brought interest mainly due to having been the first one differentiating from the Birka and Tingsgården finds: it has three pole sockets, the yard ends with animal head terminal and the tassels are pointed.

    Literature
    : Brandt 1986; Edgren 1988; Thunmark-Nylén 2000; Brandt 2002; Ekberg 2002; Lamm 2002; Lamm 2003; Lamm 2004; Thunmark-Nylén 2006.

Häffinds weathervane. Source: Thunmark-Nylén 2006: Abb. III:40:7:I; Lamm 2002: Bild 4g.

  • Söderby, Lovö, Uppland, Sweden
    A completely shape-identical bronze weathervane was found in spring of 2002 during excavation in Söderby, Sweden, lead by Bo Petré. It was unearthed in a particularly interesting cremation grave A 37 – it seems the grave was deliberately dug within a Bronze Age barrow, and the dead (presumed male) was laid on a bear fur along with dogs, a horse, a chest, a long knife, a silver-posament decorated clothing, two oriental silver coins from 9th century, a comb, a whetstone, two ceramic cups and an iron necklace with a hammer pendant and then cremated (Petré 2011: 60-61). The weathervane is 48 mm long, 37 mm wide and weighs 19,9 grams. Three pole sockets hold a bronze circular shaft, which is broken on both ends (Lamm 2002: 39). The grave has been dated to 10th century (Lamm 2002: 39). Currently, the item is stored in The Swedish History Museum under catalogue number 26192 (F2).

    Literature
    : Ekberg 2002; Lamm 2002; Lamm 2003; Lamm 2004; Thunmark-Nylén 2006; Petré 2011; catalogue SHM.

Söderby weathervane. Source: catalogue SHM.

  • Novoselki, Smolensk, Russia
    After the Söderby weathervane find, Jan Peder Lamm, the author of an article about miniature weathervanes, received a message of yet another object from Russian archaeologist Kirill Michailov of the IIMK Institute of Russian Academy of Sciences. The miniature weathervane was excavated in Novoselki village in Smolensk area. The message also included a drawing, produced by Mr. Michailov himself after the find in 1996. The drawing shows that the item is the same type like the Häffinds and Söderby finds, though differentiating in the number of pole sockets – having only two instead of three and mounted with an iron shaft. Dr. Lamm stated (Lamm 2002: 40; Lamm 2003: 61) that the find originates from the grave nr. 4, which was marked as incorrect after the publication of E. A. Schmidt’s find in 2005. Schmidt (Schmidt 2005: 196, Il. 11:2) claims that the miniature weathervane was found in the grave nr. 6, along with a spearhead, a knife and a ceramic cup. The object was depicted with a long needle pin and a ring in the form of clothing pin. Personal interviews conducted with archaeologists Sergei Kainov (State Historical Museum of Russia), Kirill Mikhailov (Institute for the History of Material Culture, Russia) and jeweller Vasily Maisky indicate that Schmidt’s drawing is a reconstruction and that the weathervane (which is now stored in The Smolensk State Museum-Preserve under inventory number 23656/1-9) is broken to pieces and lacks the central part with the ring. Despite that, there is no reason not to trust in Schmidt’s reconstruction; it only means that not all of the pieces of the original find are on display.

    Literature: Ekberg 2002; Lamm 2002; Lamm 2003; Lamm 2004; Schmidt 2005; Thunmark-Nylén 2006.

A drawing of the Novoselki weathervane. Source: Kirill Michailov; Lamm 2004: Fig. 7.

The miniature weathervane from Novoselki. Source: Vasilij “Gudred” Maiskij.


A drawing of the weathervane from Novoselki. Source: Schmidt 2005: 196, Il. 11:2.

  • Menzlin, Mecklenburg-Vorpommern, Germany
    During the autumn of 2002, the International Sachsensymposion (Internationales Sachsensymposion 2002) was organised at the Schwerin castle, where Dr. Lamm held a speech on then newly excavated Söderby and Novoselki weathervanes. After the presentation, he was informed by Friedrich Lüth about yet another, similar object found nearby, at the Viking age trading centre Menzlin. The very same day, Mr. Lamm went to see the find that was deposited in a special showcase in Menzlin, which is used for displaying newly excavated items from the area. He acknowledged that the item is in fact a miniature weathervane and is very similar to the Birka and Tingsgården finds (Lamm 2003). The weathervane was probably excavated in 1999 and published the next year (Schirren 2000: 472, Abb. 136:1). As far as we can tell from the detailed photos, it is about 50 mm long and 38 mm wide.

    Literature
    : Schirren 2000; Ekberg 2002; Lamm 2002; Lamm 2003; Lamm 2004; Thunmark-Nylén 2006.

Menzlin weathervane. Source: Lamm 2003: Abb. 1.

Looking at the finds, we can clearly define two standardized types of the miniature weathervanes – the “Birka type” and the “Häffinds type” – along with the unusual and atypic pieces (Gropstad). Next, we will take a closer look at the presumed function of these objects and the symbolism of miniature weathervanes in Old-Norse culture.

Map of the miniature weathervane finds mentioned in the article. Source: Lamm 2004: Fig. 2.


The function of miniature weathervanes

Jan Peder Lamm had three theories on the possible function of miniature weathervanes. According to him, they were mainly a status symbols and pieces of artistic value. At the same time, he held the opinion of the objects being a part of boat-models, similar to ship-shaped candlesticks (Lamm 2002: 40; Lamm 2003: 61; Lamm 2004: 138), which we know from Norwegian church environment of 12th and 13th century (Blindheim 1983: 96, Fig. 7). The third supposed function was in a seafaring naviagion tool – Mr. Lamm suggested the weathervanes could had been used to help with determining angular height of astronomical objects. This theory was pursued before Lamm by Engström and Nykänen (Engström – Nykänen 1996) but was denoted as surreal and inconclusive (Christensen 1998).

As far as we can tell, the theory of boat models does not fit most of the listed finds. The boat-shaped candlestick platforms are at least two centuries younger and we have only one pair-find of the weathervanes from Gropstad. Thus, it is more probable that the Viking-Age miniature weathervanes were a part of clothing pins, as can be seen at the example from Novoselku. It seems that the poles were narrowed on the inserting part, while having the tip widened and flattened. Below the weathervane, there was a eyelet for attaching a string, which was used for fixing the pin. This method was most likely used for cloak fastening. The standardized look can indicate a centralized manufacture and distribution via for example gift-giving.

Cloak pins with miniature weathervanes made by Vasili “Gudred” Maisky.


Weathervane symbolism

The literature on miniature weathervanes was to a major extent focused on symbolism that was presumed the items had. From the era between 1000-1300 AD, we know of at least five complete Scandinavian weathervanes and several of their fragments – all of which were made from gilded high-percentage copper (Blindheim 1983: 104-105). That is in compliance with literary sources, which place gilded weathervanes (oldnorse: veðrviti) at the bow of the war ships of important personas (Blindheim 1983: 93; Lamm 2003: 57). The bow-situated weathervanes can also be found in 11th-13th century iconography, while in the older iconography, the weathervanes can also be found on masts (Blindheim 1983: 94-98; Lamm 2004: 140; Thunmark-Nylén 2006: 367). Aside of that, we also have several instances of the weathervane motive used on metal applications of horse harnesses, pendants and – as discussed above – as clothes pins, which are very faithful miniatures of the genuine ship weathervanes.

Scandinavian weathervanes and their fragments, 1000-1300 AD.

From the upper-left: Källunge weathervane, Heggen weathervane, Söderal weathervane, Tingelstad weathervane, Høyjord weathervane, a horse figurine from the Lolland weathervane. Source: Blindheim 1983: Figs. 1, 3, 4, 6, 9, 20.

Selection of miniature weathervanes depicted in iconography, 800-1300 AD.

From the left: Sparlösa runestone, Stenkyrka runestone, Bergen engraving, engravings from churches in Borgund, Urnes and Kaupanger. Source: Lamm 2004: Fig. 10; Blindheim 1983: Figs. 8, 10, 11, 12.

Horse harness fittings in a shape of weathervane, Borre and Gnezdovo.
Source: Myhre – Gansum 2003: 27; Lamm 2004: Fig. 9; catalogue Unimus.

Norwegian church boat-shaped candlesticks with weathervanes, 1100-1300 AD.

The weathervanes first started to appear on bow of the ships as early as 11th century, when they began to replace the wooden heads. Their function did not change though – the weathervanes were also removable, and the animals depicted on them were meant to frighten any chaotic agents dwelling along the journey. At the same time, the weathervane posed as a revering representation of the ship’s owner and thus presented a clearly distinguishable symbol. It is often stated that the function of weathervanes changed throughout the following ages, finding the usage on church buildings. However, according to Martin Blindheim (1983: 107-108), the old Norwegian military service laws mention that important ship equipment was stored in churches, and while the rest of the equipment (sails, ropes) fell victim to the passing of time, the weathervanes survived and became a permanent property of the churches. The connection of a church and a ship in naval-oriented Scandinavia is also backed up by the church boat-shaped candlesticks.

At the very least we can say that during the Viking Age, the weathervane was perceived as a property of the ship’s owner and as a precious symbol referring to naval activity and personal reputation. Not every ship owner could afford such an accessory though – the weathervane was undoubtedly limited only to a very small group of the richest, who owned huge and top-grade equipped vessels. The tradition of using weathervanes was so anchored in Scandinavian culture, that it had a substantial effect on weathervane usage even in different parts of Europe – e.g. France where the French word for “weathervane” (girouette) originates from Old Norse (Lindgrén – Neumann 1984).


Bibliography

Blindheim 1983 = Blindheim, Martin (1983). De gyldne skipsfløyer fra sen vikingtid. Bruk og teknikk. Viking XLVI, Oslo, 85-111.

Brandt 1986 = Brandt, Bengt (1986). Bandlundeviken. En vikingatida handelsplats på Gotland. Grävningsrapport och utvärdering, Stockholm.

Brandt 2002 = Brandt, Bengt (2002). Bandlundeviken – a Viking trading centre on Gotland. In: Burenhult, G. (ed). Remote Sensing, vol. 2, Theses and Papers in North-European Archaeology 13:b, Stockholm, 243-311.

Edgren 1988 = Edgren, Torsten (1988). Om leksaksbåtar från vikingatid och tidig medeltid. In: Steen Jensen, J. (ed.), Festskrift til Olaf Olsen på 60-års dagen den 7. juni 1988, København, 157-164.

Ekberg 2002 = Ekberg, Veronica (2002). På resa till en annan värld. Vikingatida miniatyrflöjlar. C-uppsats i arkeologi, Stockholms universitet, Stockholm.

Engström – Nykänen 1996 = Engström, Jan – Nykänen, Panu (1996). New interpretations of Viking Age weathervanes. In: Fornvännen 91:3, 137-142.

Frykberg 1977 = Frykberg, Yvonne (1977). Syrholen i Dala-Floda socken. Seminarieuppsats i arkeologi, Stockholms universitet, Stockholm.

Christensen 1998 = Christensen, Arne Emil (1998). The Viking weathervanes were not navigation instruments! In: Fornvännen 93, 202-203.

Lamm 2002 = Lamm, Jan Peder (2002). De havdjärvas märke – om vikingatidens skeppsflöjlar. In: Gotländskt arkiv 74, 33-42.

Lamm 2003 = Lamm, Jan Peder (2003). Die wikingerzeitliche Miniaturwetterfahne aus Menzlin, Lkr. Ostvorpommern, und verwandte Funde. In: Bodendenkmalpflege in Mecklenburg-Vorpommern, Jahrbuch, 50, 57-63.

Lamm 2004 = Lamm, Jan Peder (2004). Vindflöjlar : liten klenod med stort förflutet : den vikingatida flöjeln från Saltvik aktualiserad av nya fynd. In: Åländsk odling 61, 129-143.

Lindgrén – Neumann 1984 = Lindgrén, Susanne – Neumann, Jehuda (1984). Viking weather-vane practices in medieval France. In: Fornvännen 78, 197-203.

Myhre – Gansum 2003 = Myhre, Bjørn – Gansum, Terje (2003). Skipshaugen 900 e. Kr. : Borrefunnet 1852-2002, Borre.

Petré 2011 = Petré, Bo (2011). Fornlämning RAÄ 28, Söderby, Lovö sn, Up. Gravfält från vendeltid och vikingatid samt några gravar och boplatslämningar från bronsålder. Lovö Archaeological Reports and Studies Nr 10 År 2011, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Stockholm University.

Salin 1921 = Salin, Bernhard (1921). Förgylld flöjel från Söderala kyrka. In: Fornvännen 16, 1-22.

Schirren 2000 = Schirren, Michael C. (2000). Menzlin, Lkr. Ostvorpommern. In: Bodendenkmalpflege in Mecklenburg-Vorpommern, Bd. 47, Jahrbuch 1999, Lübstorf, 472.

Schmidt 2005 = Шмидт, Е.А. (2005). Курганный могильнику пос. Новоселки // Смоленские древности, Вып. 4, Смоленск, 146–218.

Sörling 2018 = Sörling, Erik (2018). Fynden från ”Svarta jorden” på Björkö : från Hjalmar Stolpes undersökningar, Katalog, Uppsala.

Thunmark-Nylén 2000 =Thunmark-Nylén, Lena (2000). Die Wikingerzeit Gotlands IV:1–3. Katalog. Stockholm.

Thunmark-Nylén 2006 = Thunmark-Nylén, Lena (2006). Die Wikingerzeit Gotlands III: 1–2 : Text, Stockholm.

Skandinávské spony s korouhvičkou

Při badatelské činnosti jsem se dlouhodobě setkával se zvláštním typem předmětů, které se označují jako miniaturní větrné korouhvičky (šv. miniatyrflöjel, miniflöjel, něm. Miniaturwetterfahne, angl. miniature weathervane). Po mnoha letech jsem se rozhodl, že tyto zajímavé artefakty zmapuji a poskytnu českému čtenáři s komentářem a odkazy na literaturu.


Popis nálezů

V současné chvíli je známo celkem osm poměrně uniformních miniaturních korouhviček ze sedmi lokalit. Na každou z nich se nyní detailněji podíváme.

  • Svarta jorden, Birka, Švédsko
    Na konci 19. století byla jedna korouhvička o délce 45 mm a šířce 35 mm nalezena v tzv. Černé zemi při vykopávkách prováděných archeologem Hjalmarem Stolpem (Salin 1921: 3, Fig. 4; Sörling 2018: 59). Korouhvička je vyrobena z bronzu, který je pozlacený (Lamm 2002: 36, Bild 4a). V současné chvíli je předmět uložen ve Švédském historickém muzeu pod katalogovým číslem 5208:188; online verze katalogu tohoto muzea udává ještě přítomnost žerdi (stång) o délce 85 mm.

    LiteraturaSalin 1921Ekberg 2002Lamm 2002Lamm 2003Lamm 2004Sörling 2018Thunmark-Nylén 2006katalog SHM.

Korouhvička z Birky. Zdroj: Salin 1921: Fig. 4katalog SHM.

  • Tingsgården, Rangsby, Saltvik, Ålandy
    Patrně roku  1881 byl na pozemku ålandského hospodáře Roberta Mattssona v Tingsgårdenu nalezena mohyla, jejíž půda byla použita k úpravě terénu pozemku. Uvnitř mohyly byla nalezena snýtovaná dřevěná rakev s pozůstatky uhlí, kostí a železný předmět. Archeologický výzkum byl podniknut až létě roku 1903, a sice Björnem Cederhvarfem z Národního muzea z Helsinek, který nález zdokumentoval a převezl do helsinského muzea. Hospodářův syn v půdě z mohyly nalezl poničený bronzový předmět se stylizovaným zvěrným ornamentem – korouhvičku o délce 52 mm, výšce 37,5 mm a váze 17,6 gramů. Předmět je dodnes uložen ve Finském národním muzeu pod inventárním číslem 4282:13, v Ålandském muzeu lze spatřit jen zdařilou repliku (Salin 1921: 20, Fig. 21; Lamm 2002: Bild 4c; Lamm 2004).

    Literatura
    Salin 1921Ekberg 2002Lamm 2002Lamm 2003Lamm 2004Thunmark-Nylén 2006.


Korouhvička z Tingsgårdenu. Zdroj: Lamm 2002: Bild 4c; Lamm 2004: Fig. 1.

  • Gropstad, Syrholen, Dala-Floda, Dalarna, Švédsko
    Zřejmě roku 1971 byl u lokality Gropstad u Dala-Flody objeven silně poškozený kremační hrob, který sestával pouze ze dvou fragmentárních odlitků korouhviček (Frykberg 1977: 25-30). Oba jsou vyrobeny z bronzu a liší se od sebe tvarem, stupněm zachování a dekorací. Zatímco jeden nemá zachované úchyty pro žerď, má výraznější střapce a je zdoben stylem Borre, u druhého se úchyty pro žerď dochovaly, avšak nemá výrazné střapce – místo nich má otvory, za které mohly být střapce pověšeny – a je zdoben jednoduchými soustřednými kruhy. V současné době jsou korouhvičky uloženy v  Muzeu Dalarny ve městě Falun.

    LiteraturaFrykberg 1977Ekberg 2002Lamm 2002Lamm 2003Lamm 2004Thunmark-Nylén 2006.


Korouhvičky z Gropstadu. Zdroj: Lamm 2002: Bild 4e-f.

  • Häffinds, Burs, Bandlunde, Gotland
    Další korouhvička byla nalezena při výzkumu vikinského tržiště poblíž Häffinds na východním břehu Gotlandu (Thunmark-Nylén 2006: 366-367, Abb. III:40:7:I). Vykopávky tehdy vedl Göran Burenhult ze stockholmské univerzity a korouhvička byla nejzajímavějším nálezem jím vedených vykopávek. Je vyrobena z bronzu ve velikosti 53 mm × 42 mm (Thunmark-Nylén 2000: 92) či 54 × 43 mm (Lamm 2002: 39, Bild 4g; Lamm 2003: 60). Váží 26 gramů (Lamm 2002: 39). Ve své době tato korouhvička vyvolala zájem zejména proto, že byla první, která se výrazně odlišovala od nálezů z Birky a Tingsgårdenu : má tři úchyty pro žerď, ráhno končí vyceněnou zvířecí hlavou a střapce jsou zašpičatělé.

    Literatura
    Brandt 1986Edgren 1988Thunmark-Nylén 2000; Brandt 2002Ekberg 2002Lamm 2002Lamm 2003Lamm 2004Thunmark-Nylén 2006.

Korouhvička z Häffinds. Zdroj: Thunmark-Nylén 2006: Abb. III:40:7:I; Lamm 2002: Bild 4g.

  • Söderby, Lovö, Uppland, Švédsko
    Tvarově zcela identická bronzová korouhvička byla nalezena na jaře roku 2002 při vykopávkách v Söderby, které vedl Bo Petré. Konkrétně byla nalezena v mimořádně zajímavém kremačním hrobu A 37 – zdá se, že hrob byl záměrně vyhlouben v mohyle z doby bronzové, a zemřelý, zřejmě muž, byl před žehem uložen na medvědí kožešinu se psy, koněm, truhlou, dlouhým nožem, oděvem zdobeným stříbrným pozamentem, dvěma orientálními stříbrnými mincemi z 9. století, hřebenem, brouskem, dvěma keramickými poháry a železným náhrdelníkem s přívěskem kladiva (Petré 2011: 60-61). Korouhvička má délku 48 mm, výšku 37 mm a váhu 19,9 gramů. Tři úchyty jsou vyplněny bronzovou tyčkou kruhového průřezu, která je na obou koncích ulomená (Lamm 2002: 39). Hrob je datován do 10. století (Lamm 2002: 39). V současné chvíli je předmět uložen ve Švédském historickém muzeu pod katalogovým číslem 36192 (F2).

    Literatura
    Ekberg 2002Lamm 2002Lamm 2003Lamm 2004Thunmark-Nylén 2006Petré 2011katalog SHM.

Korouhvička ze Söderby. Zdroj: katalog SHM.

  • Novoselki, Smolensk, Rusko
    Jan Peder Lamm, autor článků o miniaturních korouhvičkách, po objevu korouhvičky z Söderby obdržel zprávu od ruského archeologa Kirilla Michailova z Institutu IIMK Ruské akademie nauk zprávu o další korouhvičce, nalezené ve vesnici Novoselki ve smolenské oblasti. Součástí zprávy byla také kresba, kterou pan Michailov vytvořil během odkrytí roku 1996. Z ní je patrné, že jde o stejný typ, jako u korouhviček z Häffinds a Söderby, avšak místo tří úchytů u ní nacházíme pouze dva, opět vyplněné kovovou žerdí. Dr. Lamm uvedl (Lamm 2002: 40; Lamm 2003: 61), že nález pochází z hrobu č. 4, což se ale po publikování nálezu E. A. Schmidtem roku 2005 ukázalo jako chybné. Schmidt (Schmidt 2005: 196, Il. 11:2) uvádí, že se korouhvička našla v hrobu č. 6, společně s hrotem kopí, nožem a keramickým pohárem. Korouhvičku znázorňuje s dlouhou jehlicí a kroužkem ve formě oděvní spony. Osobní rozhovory s archeologem Sergejem Kainovem, Kirillem Michailovem a šperkařem Vasilem Maiskym ukázaly, že Schmidtova kresba je rekonstrukcí a že korouhvička, která je nyní uložena ve Smolenském muzeu pod inv. č. 23656/1-9 bez středové části s kroužkem, je na kusy rozlámaná. Není však důvodu Schmidtově rekonstrukci nevěřit; pouze to znamená, že ne všechny části původního nálezu jsou vystaveny.


    Literatura
    Ekberg 2002Lamm 2002Lamm 2003Lamm 2004Schmidt 2005Thunmark-Nylén 2006.

Kresba korouhvičky z Novoselek. Zdroj: Kirill Michailov; Lamm 2004: Fig. 7.

Korouhvička z Novoselek. Zdroj: Vasilij “Gudred” Maiskij.


Kresba korouhvičky z Novoselek. Zdroj: Schmidt 2005: 196, Il. 11:2.

  • Menzlin, Mecklenburg-Vorpommern, Německo
    Na podzim roku 2002 se na zámku Schwerin konala Mezinárodní saské sympozium 2002 (Internationales Sachsensymposion 2002), na němž Dr. Lamm přednesl příspěvek o tehdy nových nálezech ze Söderby a Novoselek. Po konci příspěvku jej Friedrich Lüth upozornil, že podobný předmět byl nalezen také nedaleko místa konání, v obchodním centru Menzlin. Ještě téhož večera si jej pan Lamm prohlédl ve speciální vitríně v Menzlinu, do které se umisťují nové nálezy z lokality, a seznal, že se jedná o korouhvičku, která je velmi podobná nálezům z Birky a Tingsgårdenu (Lamm 2003). Korouhvička byla objevena zřejmě roku 1999 a byla publikována následujícího roku (Schirren 2000: 472, Abb. 136:1). Nakolik lze soudit z detailních fotografií, korouhvička je dlouhá zhruba 50 mm a vysoká 38 mm.

    Literatura
    Schirren 2000Ekberg 2002Lamm 2002Lamm 2003Lamm 2004Thunmark-Nylén 2006.

Korouhvička z Menzlinu. Zdroj: Lamm 2003: Abb. 1.

Nakolik můžeme vidět, vyčleňují se nám dva různé standardizované typy – “typ Birka” a “typ Häffinds” -, jakož i nestandardní, atypické kusy (Gropstad). V následující částech se podíváme na funkci těchto miniatur a symboliku větrných korouhviček ve staroseverském prostředí.

Mapa miniaturních korouhviček uvedených ve výčtu. Zdroj: Lamm 2004: Fig. 2.


Funkce miniaturních korouhviček

Jan Peder Lamm v minulosti zastával tři názory na funkci miniaturních korouhviček. Podle něj mělo jít v první řadě o  statutový a umělecký předmět. Současně prosazoval názor, že se jednalo o součásti modelů lodí na způsob svícnů (Lamm 2002: 40; Lamm 2003: 61; Lamm 2004: 138), které známe z norského kostelního prostředí 12.-13 století (Blindheim 1983: 96, Fig. 7). Třetí funkcí předmětu bylo podle Lamma užití při navigaci, kde korouhvičky mohly pomoci k určování úhlové výšky nebeských těles. Tuto teorii před Lammem již rozvinuli Engström a Nykänen (Engström – Nykänen 1996), experti ji však označili za fantaskní a nepřesvědčivou (Christensen 1998).

Nakolik můžeme soudit, teorie o modelech lodí neplatí zdaleka pro všechny uvedené kusy. Kostelní svícny ve tvaru lodí jsou nejméně o dvě staletí mladší a párové korouhvičky známe pouze z Gropstadu. Přiklonit se můžeme spíše interpretaci, že miniaturní korouhvičky doby vikinské byly součástmi oděvních spon, jak to ukazuje korouhvička z Novoselek. Zdá se, že žerdě byly v místě nasouvání na úchyty ztenčené, na hrotu naopak rozšířené a zploštělé, pod korouhvičkou opatřeny očkem na připevnění šňůrky, jejíž fixování opisovalo osmičku kolem korouhvičky a hrotu nebo jednoduše pouze jehlu. Touto sponou bylo možné fixovat plášť. Uniformnost tvarů a vzhledu svědčí o možné centrální výrobě a distribuci, například formou darů.

Spony s korouhvičkou vyrobené Vasilem “Gudredem” Maiskym


Symbolika korouhviček

Literatura, která referovala o miniaturních korouhvičkách, si ve velké míře všímala symboliky, která byla korouhvím přisuzována. Z období let 1000-1300 známe nejméně pět skandinávských kompletních korouhví a několik jejich fragmentů – všechny jsou vyrobeny z pozlacené vysokoprocentní mědi (Blindheim 1983: 104-105). To je ve shodě s písemnými prameny, které pozlacené větrné korouhve – ve staroseverštině veðrviti – kladou na přídě válečných lodí významných osob (Blindheim 1983: 93; Lamm 2003: 57). Korouhve na přídích můžeme nalézt také v ikonografii 11.-13. století, zatímco v ikonografii starší je můžeme nalézt i na stěžni (Blindheim 1983: 94-98; Lamm 2004: 140; Thunmark-Nylén 2006: 367). Kromě toho se s motivem korouhvičky setkáváme u kovových aplikací koňských postrojů, přívěšků, a – jak jsme výše ukázali – oděvních spon, které jsou velmi věrnými miniaturami skutečných lodních korouhví.

Skandinávské větrné korouhve a jejich fragmenty, 1000-1300. 

Zleva nahoře: korouhev z Källunge, korouhev z Heggenu, korouhev ze Söderaly, korouhev z Tingelstadu, korouhev z Høyjordu, figurka koníka z korouhve z Lollandu. Zdroj: Blindheim 1983: Figs. 1, 3, 4, 6, 9, 20.

Výběr korouhviček vyobrazených v ikonografii, 800-1300.

Zleva: kámen ze Sparlösy, kámen ze Stenkyrky, rytina z Bergenu, rytiny z kostelů v Borgundu, Urnesu a Kaupangeru. Zdroj: Lamm 2004: Fig. 10; Blindheim 1983: Figs. 8, 10, 11, 12.

Kování koňského postroje ve tvaru korouhvičky, Borre a Gnězdovo. 
Zdroj: Myhre – Gansum 2003: 27; Lamm 2004: Fig. 9; katalog Unimus.

Norské kostelní svícny ve tvaru lodí s korouhvičkami, 11.-13. století.

Větrné korouhvičky se na přídích zřejmě začaly objevovat již v 11. století, kdy začaly nahrazovat dřevěné hlavy. Jejich funkce se však příliš neposunula – korouhvičky byly rovněž odjímatelné a zvířata na nich umístěná měla vystrašit chaotické agenty, kteří se skrývali na cestách. Současně však korouhev důstojně reprezentovala majitele lodě a vytvářela snadno čitelný symbol. Často se uvádí, že funkce korouhví se v průběhu následujících staletí změnila a korouhve se začaly užívat převážně na kostelech. Jak však názorně ukazuje Martin Blindheim (1983: 107-108), v norském zákonu o branné hotovosti se můžeme dočíst, že důležité součásti lodního vybavení bylo skladováno právě v kostelech, a zatímco ostatní vybavení jako plachty nebo lana zubu času neunikly, korouhve přečkaly a dostaly se do stálého vlastnictví kostelů. Spojitost kostelů a lodí v námořnicky orientované Skandinávii ukazují také kostelní svícny ve tvaru miniaturních lodí.

Přinejmenším v době vikinské byla korouhev chápána jako osobní vlastnictví majitele lodi a drahý symbolem odkazující na námořní aktivity. Takovéto vybavení si však nemohl dovolit každý majitel lodi – korouhvička byla zcela jistě omezena pouze na úzký okruh nejbohatších, kteří vlastnili velká a špičkově vybavená plavidla. Tradice užívání korouhví byla ve Skandinávii natolik zakotvená, že zásadním způsobem ovlivnila používání korouhví i v jiných částech Evropy – například ve Francii, přičemž francouzské slovo pro “korouhev” (girouette) vychází právě ze staroseverštiny (Lindgrén – Neumann 1984).


Bibliografie

Blindheim 1983 = Blindheim, Martin (1983). De gyldne skipsfløyer fra sen vikingtid. Bruk og teknikk. Viking XLVI, Oslo, 85-111.

Brandt 1986 = Brandt, Bengt (1986). Bandlundeviken. En vikingatida handelsplats på Gotland. Grävningsrapport och utvärdering, Stockholm.

Brandt 2002 = Brandt, Bengt (2002). Bandlundeviken – a Viking trading centre on Gotland. In: Burenhult, G. (ed). Remote Sensing, vol. 2, Theses and Papers in North-European Archaeology 13:b, Stockholm, 243-311.

Edgren 1988 = Edgren, Torsten (1988). Om leksaksbåtar från vikingatid och tidig medeltid. In: Steen Jensen, J. (ed.), Festskrift til Olaf Olsen på 60-års dagen den 7. juni 1988, København, 157-164.

Ekberg 2002 = Ekberg, Veronica (2002). På resa till en annan värld. Vikingatida miniatyrflöjlar. C-uppsats i arkeologi, Stockholms universitet, Stockholm.

Engström – Nykänen 1996 = Engström, Jan – Nykänen, Panu (1996). New interpretations of Viking Age weathervanes. In: Fornvännen 91:3, 137-142.

Frykberg 1977 = Frykberg, Yvonne (1977). Syrholen i Dala-Floda socken. Seminarieuppsats i arkeologi, Stockholms universitet, Stockholm.

Christensen 1998 = Christensen, Arne Emil (1998). The Viking weathervanes were not navigation instruments! In: Fornvännen 93, 202-203.

Lamm 2002 = Lamm, Jan Peder (2002). De havdjärvas märke – om vikingatidens skeppsflöjlar. In: Gotländskt arkiv 74, 33-42.

Lamm 2003 = Lamm, Jan Peder (2003). Die wikingerzeitliche Miniaturwetterfahne aus Menzlin, Lkr. Ostvorpommern, und verwandte Funde. In: Bodendenkmalpflege in Mecklenburg-Vorpommern, Jahrbuch, 50, 57-63.

Lamm 2004 = Lamm, Jan Peder (2004). Vindflöjlar : liten klenod med stort förflutet : den vikingatida flöjeln från Saltvik aktualiserad av nya fynd. In: Åländsk odling 61, 129-143.

Lindgrén – Neumann 1984 = Lindgrén, Susanne – Neumann, Jehuda (1984). Viking weather-vane practices in medieval France. In: Fornvännen 78, 197-203.

Myhre – Gansum 2003 = Myhre, Bjørn – Gansum, Terje (2003). Skipshaugen 900 e. Kr. : Borrefunnet 1852-2002, Borre.

Petré 2011 = Petré, Bo (2011). Fornlämning RAÄ 28, Söderby, Lovö sn, Up. Gravfält från vendeltid och vikingatid samt några gravar och boplatslämningar från bronsålder. Lovö Archaeological Reports and Studies Nr 10 År 2011, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Stockholm University.

Salin 1921 = Salin, Bernhard (1921). Förgylld flöjel från Söderala kyrka. In: Fornvännen 16, 1-22.

Schirren 2000 = Schirren, Michael C. (2000). Menzlin, Lkr. Ostvorpommern. In: Bodendenkmalpflege in Mecklenburg-Vorpommern, Bd. 47, Jahrbuch 1999, Lübstorf, 472.

Schmidt 2005 = Шмидт, Е.А. (2005). Курганный могильнику пос. Новоселки // Смоленские древности, Вып. 4, Смоленск, 146–218.

Sörling 2018 = Sörling, Erik (2018). Fynden från ”Svarta jorden” på Björkö : från Hjalmar Stolpes undersökningar, Katalog, Uppsala.

Thunmark-Nylén 2000 =Thunmark-Nylén, Lena (2000). Die Wikingerzeit Gotlands IV:1–3. Katalog. Stockholm.

Thunmark-Nylén 2006 = Thunmark-Nylén, Lena (2006). Die Wikingerzeit Gotlands III: 1–2 : Text, Stockholm.