Early Medieval Mittens and Gloves

Just like in modern population, early medieval people wore mittens and gloves for various reasons. In this article, we will show how these mittens and gloves looked and what was their possible function.


By material

 

Leather
This material section contains leather and fur mittens and gloves.

  • Leather mittens and gloves
    Mittens and gloves made of leather protect against cold, heat and bruises. They can also fulfil an aesthetical function as they adhere to the body well. Four finds come from the 7th century. Grave No. 17 in Oberflacht, Germany contained “a strange pair of mittens with thick folds on the back and underlined with soft, almost ruined fabric” (Dürrich – Menzel 1847: 11). A very similar example, made of a fine leather lined with linen, was found in the rich grave from Greding, Bavaria (Mord im Mittelalter 2012). The third example is a mitten decorated with an intertwined application from the boy’s grave from Cologne Cathedral, Germany (Gillich et al. 2008: 8-11). The fourth mitten is a fragment of goatskin decorated with an intertwined application from the grave no. 8 in St. Ulrich’s and St. Afra’s Abbey, Augsburg (Werner 1977: 163). Danish Hjørring Museum contains fragments of presumable mittens from the Viking Age made of lambskin, which were preserved probably thanks to being stored in a bronze vessel. Next suitable material comes from the Caucasus. It is a fingerglove from Moscevaja Balka, which probably belonged to a woman due to its size and is made of soft lambskin, decorated by sewn-on ribbons and red morocco leather circles on the knuckles (Jerusalimskaja 2012: 212, Пл. 130). Fingertips of this glove seem to be open so the last phalanxes were bare. Another Caucasian mittens from the period of 8th to 10th century are located in Metropolitan Museum, New York (Kajitani 2001: 90, Fig. 8). These mittens also leave phalanxes bare.

    If we looked into the Middle Ages in Europe, we would find a solid tradition of leather mittens described as “work mittens” in archeological literature (Dahlbäck 1983: Fig. 201, Fig. 202; Williemsen 2015: 8–11). We can find these in the areas of present Denmark (Svendborg), Germany (Lübeck, Schleswig), Netherlands, Norway (i.e. Trondheim), Poland (Wrocław), Russia (Pskov, Novgorod), Sweden (Stockholm) and Great Britain (London) (Schnack 1998: 74–78; Williemsen 2015 and the Unimus catalogue). Medieval leather mittens were typically made of lambskin and cow leather (Mould et al. 2003: 3222; Williemsen 2015: 12).

Presumable fragments of leather mitten, find and reconstruction.
Museum of Hjørring, photographed by Elin Sonja Petersen.

Fragments of leather mitten made of fine leather lined with linen.
Rich grave from Greding, Bavaria, around 700 AD. Mord im Mittelalter 2012.


Leather mitten decorated with an application, Cologne Cathedral.
Gillich et al. 2008: 10.

A fragment of goatskin mitten decorated with an application. Grave no. 8 in St. Ulrich’s and St. Afra’s Abbey, Augsburg.
Martin 1988: Abb. 5; Peek – Nowak-Böck 2016: Abb. 28-29Gillich et al. 2008: 12-13.


Leather mittens from Moscevaja Balka (Jerusalimskaja 2012: Пл. 130).

Caucasian leather mittens (Kajitani 2001: 90, Fig. 8).

  • Fur mittens
    Mittens made of fur with hair inside seem to have a practical sense especially against coldness. Right hand mitten from Old Ladoga made of sheepskin in 8-9th century (Ojateva 1965: 50, Рис. 3 : 1) can be mentioned among early medieval finds. In the Saga of Eiríkr the Red (3), there is a seer who wears “mittens of cat fur with white hair inside”.


Mitten made of sheepskin, Old Ladoga, 8.–9th century.
Ojateva 1965: Рис. 3 : 1.

Wool

Mittens made of wool were among the most popular ones. Methods of their manufacture could differ.

  • Felt mittens
    Felting is a method of weaving fibers of wetted woven fabric in order to make a hardier, rain-proof textile. Two pieces which can be related to felt mittens can be found in the literature. One is the fingerless mitten from Dorestad, Netherlands (7–10th century), which is made of two pieces of brown dyed, felted wool fabric originally sewn from herringbone textile (Brandenburgh 2010: 69; Miedema 1980: 250–254). Simple rectangular cover is thickened by a sewn-on square on the palm side. Brown felt fragment, perhaps originally belonging to a nålebound mitten, was found inside a grave in Finnish Halikko Rikala location and is dated to the 11th century. (Vajanto 2014: 24–25). Felt mittens were used also in medieval Netherlands (Williemsen 2015: 4–5).

Simple two-pieced mitten from Dorestad.
Miedema 1980: Pl. 24, Fig. 174.

  • Nålebound mittens
    Mittens made by nålbinding technique were apparently popular in early Middle Ages, as shown by their geographic and chronological spread (Vajanto 2014: 22; Walton 1989: 341–345). That was because of their flexibility and sturdiness, which were essential especially in case of socks and mittens. Factual evidence comes from Iceland and Finland. The Icelandic mitten was found in the ruins of Arneiðarstaðir farmstead together with a bronze ringed-pin dated to 10th cenutry (Hald 1951). Nålebound fragments were found in at least five Finnish, mostly women’s graves from 11th century (Eura Luistari 56, Halikko Rikala 38, Kaarina Kirkkomäki 31, Köyliö Köyliönsaari 28, Masku Humikkala 30) near the hands, which suggests that the body was put into the grave wearing mittens (Vajanto 2014: 25). Such fragments were often striped or embroidered; in case of the striped variants it was a combination of dark and light thread or a combination of blue, white and red shades (Vajanto 2014: 25–26). In case of the Finnish mittens, it is presumed that protection against cold was not their primary function as some burials occured in other seasons than winter, some dyes were not amongst the standardly used ones and the fragments did not imply using thumbs (Vajanto 2014: 30).

Mitten found in the ruins of Arneiðarstaðir farmstead.
Hald 1951: 1. mynd.

Presumable fragment of a mitten and its possible reconstruction.
Vajanto 2014: Figs. 2, 6, 7.

  • Mittens sewn from a woven fabric
    Mittens which were cut and sewn from a woven fabric with no underlining were probably the most frequently used of all. Presently we document three mittens on Iceland, one on the Shetland Islands, one in Norway, two in Germany and one in Netherlands. We will begin with the Icelandic ones. In the year 1881, in the place of former farmstead of Garðar on Akranes, a mitten was found that could be dated to the farmstead’s origin, which means 9-10th century. (Pálsson 1895: 34–35). The mitten is four-pieced – front and back part, sewn-in thumb and an inset – left-handed and assuming from its wrist width, it was worn over upper clothing. It is interesting that the manufacturer used 2/2 twill with inwoven pile of unspun short tufts of brushed wool for the mitten, with the tufts functioning as an isolation (Guðjónsson 1962: 21–22). The remaining two Icelandic mittens were found together and therefore present the only preserved pair. They were found on Heynes in 1960 (Guðjónsson 1962: 16). These are evidently children’s mittens and they are connected with a sewn-on lace that could be threaded through sleeves, so the child would not lose them. These were probably made from re-used material which originally had a different function (Guðjónsson 1962: 30). The mittens are therefore unlike: right one is made of three pieces (main frame and two opposite pieces for the thumb), while the left one is four-pieced (two opposite pieces for the frame and two opposite pieces for the thumb). Thumb holes are not on the edge, instead they are placed with certain spacing.

    Another mitten made of rough woven wool was found on Shetlands during peat extraction (Vikings 2012). It was carbon-dated to 975, which is unfortunately the only detail we know. A presumably left-handed mitten was found in 2011 on the melting Lendbreen iceberg in Norway, conservatively estimated to be from the years 800–1000. It seems that this mitten was composed of at least four pieces: back, thumb and two-pieced palm. One German mitten was found in Ralswiek and it is dated to 8–9th century (Herrmann 1985: 288, Abb. 136). This one has a seam alongside its whole length and its wrist collar presents a standalone piece. The second German glove or mitten comes from the grave no. 58 in Trossingen, 6th century; the glove was made of red, yellow and black fabric that was decorated with an intertwined leather application and a reinforced leather thumb (Peek – Nowak-Böck 2016: 385-390). We should also mention the presumably right-handed mitten from Aalsum, Netherlands, which is dated to 8–10th century. The only known detail we have is that the warp threads are of average or small width and therefore density, while the weft threads are very thick and therefore have a low density per square centimeter. This solution, probably aiming to save material, can be also seen in cases of mittens from Garðar and Shetlands. Moreover, the mitten from Aalsum was also sewn together with a very thick thread.

    As far as we know, there is one written evidence of feather mitten from the early Middle Ages. It can be found in Haraldskvæði (verse 6) by Þorbjǫrn hornklofi, where it can be read that the ruler Haraldr Fairhair wore mittens stuffed with downy feathers – probably of an eider – in his youth (or child years). This verse compared a matured man willing to sail and fight even in winter and a spoiled boy who rather spends the winter in women’s part of the palace and wears feather mittens on his hands. From the context of this mitten we can perceive it as pertaining to a wealthy child’s apparel.

Mitten from Garðar, Iceland. Photography by dolbex.

Pair of mittens Heynes, Iceland.
Photography taken from Sarpur.is.


Mitten from the Shetland Islands. Vikings 2012.

Mitten from the Lendbreen iceberg in Norway.
Photos taken from Unimus.no catalogue.

Woolen mitten from Ralswiek (Herrmann 1985: 288, Abb. 136).


Possible look of the glove / mitten from the grave no. 58, Trossingen, 6th century.
Peek – Nowak-Böck 2016: Abb. 26.

Mitten from Aalsum, Netherlands. Brandenburgh 2010: Fig. 22.

Metal

Early Middle Ages provide us with only decent traces of iron mail being used as a hand protection. The most important find of this kind comes from grave no. 8 in Swedish Valsgärde, which contained guards for both legs and one hand, originally misinterpreted as chestplate (Arwidsson 1939; Arwidsson 1954). Iron mail was most probably attached to these guards and in case of the right hand it was used as a coating of the presumably leather mitten or glove (Vike 2000). This find is dated to the 7th century. That is the same for another probable find, a fragment of iron mail from grave no. 119 in Castel Trosino, Italy, which was found near the deceased body’s hand (Beatson 2011–12). If we extended our search outside Europe, we could for example find scale gloves used in the area of present Iran.

Probable reconstruction of limb protection from Valsgärde 8.
Property of Matt Bunker.

A fragment of iron mail from grave no. 119 in Castel Trosino, Italy.
Cristiano Da Mont’Olmo Carassai.

By shape

According to the information we have, we can divide mittens and gloves by shape:

  • Fingerless mittens (warmers)
    Simple fingerless warmers fulfiling the function of mittens were documented in the area of present Netherlands, specifically the felt mitten from Dorestad. Fingerless form is speculated also in case of Finnish nålebound mittens, which were preserved without thumbs, however this could be a coincidence. We encountered no medieval analogy to this find. That is probably because this was a very primitive and impractical manner of hand protection.

  • Mittens
    Variously constructed mitten seems to be the most common early medieval shape and is continued until today. We assume it to occur in leather, textile and even metal variations. A mitten with its fingertips bare presents a specific variation known from the Caucasus. Norse myths also refer to mittens (related to the myth described in Gylfaginning 45).

  • Finger gloves
    Aside from the Trossingen and Caucasian specimens we described earlier, it is supposed that finger gloves were not widespread in continental Europe until the 12th century. Even three finger gloves cannot be confirmed for the early Middle Ages despite their significant popularity in 14-16th century (Williemsen 2015: 18–20).

By function

As suggested before, gloves and mittens had multiple functions. Here is the outline:

  • Protection against cold
    The most presumed function is definitely protection against cold. Many mittens were undoubtedly intended to keep the hand warm and this aim was supported by additional protection – fur (Old Ladoga, Saga of Eiríkr the Red), inwoven tufts of wool (Garðar) or feathers (Haraldskvæði). We can assume that children’s mittens (Heynes, Haraldskvæði) were designated to keep their hands warm. One of the mittens (Lendbreen) was found on an iceberg with a popular tradition of reindeer hunting, which can be considered as an evidence of the mitten’s function. Moreover, a mitten was displayed on a 11th century runestone from the church in Sproge (G 373), Gotland, depicting a sleigh rider wearing mitten on his hand while driving horses (Snædal – Gustavson 2013: 43–48).

Horse-drawn sleigh on the runestone G 373 from Sproge, Gotland, 11th century.
Snædal – Gustavson 2013: 45.

  • Working in cold and wet weather
    It is logical that mittens were not only worn in wintertime during transport (horses, sleigh, ski, skates, ships). They were used while hunting, pulling ropes on a ship, fishing, tar making, plowing, herding, woodcutting, peat mining and other outdoor activities which could take place in bad weather.

  • Blacksmithing
    We could expect mittens being used while working at a forge. Nevertheless, this assumption is not confirmed; early medieval iconography depicts blacksmiths wearing no mittens nor gloves, sometimes also with their sleeves pulled up. The closest material can be found in a Norse myth referring to iron mittens enabling one to grab heated metal (Skáldskaparmál 26).

  • Falconry
    The noble art of falconry has often included wearing leather mittens, which provide better features against the bird’s grip. As far as we know, we have only two pieces of evidence for falconer’s mittens being used in early medieval Europe. The older one comes from a Byzantine mosaic inside so called Falconer’s Villa in Aros, Greece, which dates to the 6th century (Wallis 2017: Illus. 2). The newer source comes from an Anglo-Saxon cross in Bewcastle, England and is dated to 7-8th century (Wallis 2017: 430). In the rest of falconry scenes, for example on the Bayeux tapestry, people do not wear hand protection and have their birds of prey on bare hands (Owen-Crocker 2004: 265). Even skaldic kennings related to falconry do not mention hand protection. It is therefore legitimate to wonder if these cultural products reflect the reality trustworthily. Falconry scenes of 12th century and further periods already contain finger gloves (i.e. Schnack 1998: 48).


Mosaic inside the Falconer’s Villa. Argos, Greece, 6th century (Wallis 2017: Illus. 2).


Falconry scene on a cross in Bewcastle.
Taken from greatenglishchurches.co.uk.

  • Protection in fight
    Despite many historical parallels and common sense we are unable to prove other than rare use of protective hand protection during a fight. Mittens or gloves coated with iron mail present the only exceptions. As it seems, the absence of protection in sources is not caused by ravages of time, but instead by a different approach to this issue. The fighters apparently preferred fine motorics, were able to effectively block with their shields and in battle they mostly used a combination of shields and pole weapons. But most importantly, no kind of period protection could fully protect against all weapon types. We have already attended the issue here in more detail. The very same problem pertains also to archer’s gloves which could not be confirmed.

  • Part of a spectacular clothing
    Nevertheless, gloves and mittens could also fulfil an aesthetical function on the hands of wealthy and powerful. We saw they could be custom-made, painted, embroidered (Finnish mittens), decorated with expensive materials (Moscevaja Balka) or stuffed with deluxe padding (Haraldskvæði). They could therefore serve as a symbol of status to some extent, which is apparent especially in case of rulers and church representatives. We will mention two illustrative examples. Mittens are mentioned in the last will of Anglo-Saxon noble called Byrhtnoth, who leaves a “pair of skilfully crafted gloves (Owen-Crocker 2004: 265), and they also appear as a gift in the Saga of Njál (31), where the king bestows leather mittens embroidered with gold.


Bibliography

Sources

Gylfaginning = Gylfiho oblouzení. Přel. Helena Kadečková. In: Snorri Sturluson. Edda a Sága o Ynglinzích. Praha: Argo, 2003, 37–101.

Skáldskaparmál = Jazyk básnický. Přel. Helena Kadečková. In: Snorri Sturluson. Edda a Sága o Ynglinzích, Praha: Argo, 2003, 102–144.

Saga of Eiríkr the Red = Sága o Eiríkovi Zrzavém. Přel. Ladislav Heger. In: Staroislandské ságy, Praha, 1965: 15–34.

Saga of Njál = Sága o Njálovi. Přel. Ladislav Heger. In: Staroislandské ságy, Praha, 1965: 321–559.

Þorbjǫrn hornklofi : Haraldskvæði = Þorbjǫrn hornklofi : Haraldskvæði (Hrafnsmál), ed. R. D. Fulk. In: Skaldic poetry of the Scandinavian Middle Ages. Vol. 1, [Poetry from the kings’ sagas 1 : from mythical times to c. 1035], ed. Diana Whaley, Turnhout, 2012: 91117.

Literature

Arwidsson 1939 = Arwidsson, Greta (1939). Armour of the Vendel period. In: Acta Archaeologica 10, København, 31–59.

Arwidsson 1954 = Arwidsson, Greta (1954). Valsgärde 8. Uppsala: Almqvist & Wiksells Boktryckeri.

Beatson 2011–12 = Beatson, Peter (2011–12). Armour in Byzantium in the early years of the Varangian Guard, with special reference to limb defenses. Available from: http://members.ozemail.com.au/~chrisandpeter/limb_defences/limb_defences.htm.

Brandenburgh 2010 = Brandenburgh, Chrystel R. (2010). Early medieval textile remains from settlements in the Netherlands. An evaluation of textile production. In: Journal of Archaeology in the Low Countries 2/1, 41–79.

Dahlbäck 1983 = Dahlbäck, Göran (red.) (1983). Helgeandsholmen : 1000 år i Stockholms ström, Stockholm.

Dürrich – Menzel 1847 = Dürrich, Ferdinand von – Menzel, Wolfgang (1847). Die Heidengräber am Lupfen (bei Oberflacht), Stuttgart : Arnold.

Gillich et al. 2008 = Gillich, Antje – Peek, Christine – Planck, Dieter – Walter, Susanne (2008). Kleidung im frühen Mittelalter: Am liebsten schön bunt! (Porträt Archäologie), Esslingen am Neckar.

Guðjónsson 1962 = Guðjónsson, E.E. (1962). Forn röggvarvefnaður. In: Árbók Hins íslenzka fornleifafélags 1962, Reykjavík, 12–71.

Hald 1951 = Hald, Maragrethe (1951). Vötturinn frá Arnheiðarstöðum. In: Árbók Hins íslenzka fornleifafélags 1949–50, Reykjavík, 73–77.

Herrmann 1985 = Herrmann, Joachim (1985). Die Slawen in Deutschland. Geschichte und Kultur der slawischen Stämme westlich von Oder und Neisse vom VI. bis XII. Jahrhundert. Ein Handbuch, Berlin.

Kajitani 2001 = Kajitani, Nobuko (2001). A Man’s Caftan and Leggings from the North Caucasus of the Eight to Tenth Century: A Conservator’s Report. In: Metropolitan Museum Journal 36, 85–124.

Jerusalimskaja 2012 = Иерусалимская, А.А. (2012). Мощевая Балка. Необычный археологический памятник на Северокавказском шёлковом пути, СПб.

Martin 1988 = Martin, Max (1988). Bemerkungen zur frühmittelalterlichen Knochenschnalle eines Klerikergrabes der St. Verenakirche von Zurzach (Kt. Aargau). In: Jahrbuch der Schweizerischen Gesellschaft für Ur- und Frühgeschichte 71, 161–177

Miedema 1980 = Miedema, M. (1980). Textile finds from Dorestad, Hoogstraat I and II. In: W. A. van Es – W. J. H. Verwers (eds). Excavations at Dorestad I, The Harbour: Hoogstraat I, (Nederlandse Oudheden 9), Amersfoort, 250–261.

Mord im Mittelalter 2012 = Mord im Mittelalter – Das Fürstengrab von Greding (Hans Peter Kernstock, Germany, 2012), discussion with Britt Nowak-Böck, 0:12:54–0:17:19.

Mould et al. 2003 = Mould, Q., Carlisle, I, Cameron, E. (2003). Craft Industry and Everyday Life: Leather and Leatherworking in Anglo-Scandinavian and Medieval York. The small finds 17/16, York.

Ojateva 1965 = Оятева, Е.И. (1965). Обувь и другие кожаные изделия Земляного городища Старой Ладоги //Археологический сборник Государственного Эрмитажа, вып. 7, 42–59.

Owen-Crocker 2004 = Owen-Crocker, Gale R. (2004). Dress in Anglo-Saxon England, Woodbridge : The Boydell Press.

Pálsson 1895 = Pálsson, Pálma (1895). Um myndir af gripum í forngripasafninu. In: Árbók Hins íslenzka fornleifafélags 1895, Reykjavík, 30–35.

Peek – Nowak-Böck 2016 = Peek, Christian – Nowak-Böck, Britt (2016). Die Untersuchungen an organischen Materialien des Grabes 58 von Trossingen (Lkr. Tuttlingen) – Vorbericht. In: Fundberichte aus Baden-Württemberg, Bd. 36, Esslingen am Neckar, 367-404.

Schnack 1998 = Schnack, Christiane (1998). Mittelalterliche Lederfunde aus Schleswig: Futterale, Riemen, Taschen und andere Objekte ; Ausgrabung Schild 1971–1975. Ausgrabungen in Schleswig Berichte und Studien 13, Neumünster.

Snædal – Gustavson 2013 = Snædal, Thorgunn – Gustavson, Helmer (2013). Supplement till Gotlands runinskrifter 1 : Sudertredingen : G 360 – G 386 samt tillägg till inskrifterna G 32, G 49, G 50, G 76, G 79, och G 104, Stockholm : Riksantikvarieämbetet.
Available from: https://www.raa.se/app/uploads/2013/09/27_sudertr.pdf

Vajanto 2014 = Vajanto, Krista (2014). Nålbinding in Prehistoric Burials – Reinterpreting Finnish 11th–14th-century AD Textile Fragments. In: Janne Ikäheimo, Anna-Kaisa Salmi & Tiina Äikäs (eds.). Sounds Like Theory. XII Nordic Theoretical Archaeology Group Meeting in Oulu 25.–28.4.2012. Monographs of the Archaeological Society of Finland 2, 21–33.

Vike 2000 = Vike, Vegard (2000). Ring weave : A metallographical analysis of ring mail material at the Oldsaksamlingen in Oslo, Oslo [University thesis]. Available from:
http://folk.uio.no/vegardav/brynje/Ring_Weave_Vegard_Vike_2000_(translated_Ny_Bj%C3%B6rn_Gustafsson).pdf.

Vikings 2012 = Vikings, episode 3 (Jon Eastman – Rosie Schellenburg – Simon Winchcombe, Great Britain, 2012), discussion of Niel Oliver with Dr. Ian Tait, 0:08:30–0:10:41.

Wallis 2017 = Wallis, R. J. (2017). “As the Falcon Her Bells” at Sutton Hoo? Falconry in Early Anglo-Saxon England. In: Archaeological Journal, 174 (2), 409–436.

Walton 1989 = Walton, Penelope (1989). Textiles, Cordage and Raw Fibre from 16-22 Coppergate. York Archaeological Trust: 17/05, London.

Werner 1977 = Werner, Joachim (Hrsg.) (1977). Die Ausgrabungen in St. Ulrich und Afra in Augsburg 1961-1968, Augsburg.

Williemsen 2015 = Williemsen, Annemarieke (2015). The Geoff Egan Memorial Lecture 2013 : Taking up the glove: finds, uses and meanings of gloves, mittens and gauntlets in western Europe, c. AD 1300–1700. In: Post-Medieval Archaeology 49/1, 1–36.

Raně středověké rukavice

Raně středověcí lidé, stejně jako moderní populace, z různých pohnutek nosili rukavice. V tomto článku si ukážeme, jak raně středověké rukavice vypadaly a jaká byla jejich možná funkce.


Podle materiálu

 

Kůže
Pod tento materiál můžeme zařadit kožené a kožešinové rukavice.

  • Kožené rukavice
    Rukavice vyrobené z kůže chrání proti chladu, žáru i oděrkům. Navíc dobře přiléhají k tělu, a tak mohou plnit estetickou funkci. Poměrně velké množství – hned čtyři nálezy – pocházejí ze 7. století. První z nich pochází z hrobu č. 17 z německého Oberflachtu, který ukrýval „podivný pár rukavic, které měly na hřbetech silné záhyby a které byly podšity jemnou, téměř rozpadlou látkou“ (Dürrich – Menzel 1847: 11). Podobný nález představuje palčák z jemné kožešiny podšitý lnem, který byl nalezen v hrobu ve velmožském hrobu v bavorském Gredingu (Mord im Mittelalter 2012). Dalším exemplářem je kožený palčák se zdobenou aplikací na okraji, nalezený v chlapeckém hrobě v Kolínském dómu (Gillich et al. 2008: 8-11). Čtvrtou rukavicí je zřejmě fragment palčáku z kozí kůže, rovněž se zdobenou aplikací na okraji, který byl nalezen v hrobě č. 8 ve Bazilice svatého Ulricha a Afry v Augsburku (Werner 1977: 163). V muzeu v dánském Hjørringu jsou vystaveny pravděpodobné fragmenty palčáku z doby vikinské, které jsou vyrobeny z jehněčí kůže a které se zachovaly díky uložení v bronzové nádobě. Nejbližší další materiál, který můžeme využít, pochází z Kavkazu. V Moščevé Balce se dochovala prstová rukavice, soudě dle velikosti přináležící ženě, která je vyrobena jemné jehněčí kůže, která je pošitá stužkami a na kloubech také kroužky z červeného safiánu (Jerusalimskaja 2012: 212, Пл. 130). Špice prstů této rukavice se zdají být volné, takže poslední články nebyly kryté. Další kavkazské rukavice ze z období 8. až 10. století se nacházejí v Metropolitním muzeu v New Yorku (Kajitani 2001: 90, Fig. 8). Tyto rukavice představují palčáky, které opět nechávají špičky prstů volné.

    Pokud bychom se podívali do evropského středověku, zjistíme, že velkou tradici měly kožené palčáky, které se v archeologické literatuře označují jako „pracovní rukavice“ (Dahlbäck 1983: Fig. 201, Fig. 202; Williemsen 2015: 8–11). Najít je můžeme na území dnešního Dánska (Svendborg), Německa (Lübeck, Šlesvik), Nizozemska, Norska (např. Trondheim), Polska (Vratislav), Ruska (Pskov, Novgorod), Švédska (Stockholm) a Velké Británie (Londýn) (Schnack 1998: 74–78; Williemsen 2015 a katalog Unimus). Středověké kožené rukavice se tradičně vyráběly z jehněčí a kravské kůže (Mould et al. 2003: 3222; Williemsen 2015: 12).

Pravděpodobné fragmenty kožené palčáku, nález a rekonstrukce.
Muzeum v Hjørringu, fotky pořídila Elin Sonja Petersen.

Pozůstatek koženého palčáku z jemné kůže.
Velmožský hrob z Gredingu, Bavorsko, kolem roku 700. Mord im Mittelalter 2012.


Kožený palčák se zdobenou aplikací na okraji. Kolínský dóm.
Gillich et al. 2008: 10.

Fragment palčáku z kozí kůže se zdobenou aplikací na okraji. Hrob č. 8 v Bazilice svatého Ulricha a Afry v Augsburku.
Martin 1988: Abb. 5; Peek – Nowak-Böck 2016: Abb. 28-29Gillich et al. 2008: 12-13.


Kožené rukavice z Moščevé Balky (Jerusalimskaja 2012: Пл. 130).

Kavkazské kožené rukavice (Kajitani 2001: 90, Fig. 8).

  • Kožešinové rukavice
    Rukavice vyrobené z kožešiny s chlupem vevnitř se zdají mít praktický význam zejména proti zimě. Z raného středověku můžeme zmínit pravý palčák ze Staré Ladogy, vyrobený z ovčí kůže v 8.–9. století (Ojateva 1965: 50, Рис. 3 : 1). V Sáze o Eiríku Zrzavém (3) je zmíněna vědma, která na rukou nosí „rukavice z kočičí kožešiny, s bílými chlupy dovnitř.


Palčák vyrobený z ovčí kožešiny, Stará Ladoga, 8.–9. století.
Ojateva 1965: Рис. 3 : 1.

Vlna

Rukavice vyrobené z vlny patřily mezi zdaleka nejpopulárnější. Metody jejich výroby se mohly lišit.

  • Plstěné rukavice
    Plstění představuje metodu, která obnáší zaplétání vláken vlhčené utkané textilie, za účelem získání odolnější a nepromokavé textilie. V literatuře můžeme najít dva kusy, které by bylo možné spojit s plstěnými rukavicemi. První z nich je bezprstá rukavice z nizozemského Dorestadu (7.–10. století), která je vyrobena ze dvou kusů hnědě zbarvené vlny zplstnatělé tkaniny původně utkané ve vazbě rybí kosti (Brandenburgh 2010: 69; Miedema 1980: 250–254). Jednoduchého obdélníkový návlek má na dlaňové straně našitý zesilující čtverec. Hnědý plstěný fragment, možná pocházející z původně pletené rukavice, byl nalezen v hrobu ve finské lokalitě Halikko Rikala a je datovaný do 11. století (Vajanto 2014: 24–25). Plstěné rukavice se používaly také ve středověkém Nizozemsku (Williemsen 2015: 4–5).

Jednoduchá dvoudílná rukavice z Dorestadu.
Miedema 1980 : Pl. 24, Fig. 174.

  • Pletené rukavice
    Palčáky vyrobené pletací technikou nålbinding musely být v raném středověku populární, jak ukazuje geografické i chronologické rozšíření (Vajanto 2014: 22; Walton 1989: 341–345). Důvodem byla flexibilita a zároveň pevnost, čehož se využívalo právě u ponožek a rukavic. Faktické důkazy pocházejí z Islandu a Finska. Islandská rukavice byla nalezena v rozvalinách statku Arneiðarstaðir společně bronzovou sponou, datovanou do 10. století (Hald 1951). V nejméně pěti finských, zejména ženských hrobech z 11. století (Eura Luistari 56, Halikko Rikala 38, Kaarina Kirkkomäki 31, Köyliö Köyliönsaari 28, Masku Humikkala 30) byly nalezeny pletené fragmenty poblíž kostí rukou, které nasvědčují, že tělo bylo do hrobu uloženo v rukavicích (Vajanto 2014: 25). Fragmenty byly často pruhované nebo vyšívané; u pruhovaných variant se jednalo o kombinace tmavých a světlých přízí, případně kombinace odstínů modré, bílé a červené (Vajanto 2014: 25–26). U finských rukavic existuje předpoklad, že neměly za svou primární funkci ochranu proti chladu, protože některé pohřby byly vystrojeny v jiná roční období než v zimě, některá barviva nepatřila mezi standardně užívaná a fragmenty nenaznačovaly použití palce (Vajanto 2014: 30).

Rukavice nalezená v rozvalinách statku Arneiðarstaðir.
Hald 1951: 1. mynd.

Pravděpodobný fragment rukavice a jeho možná rekonstrukce.
 Vajanto 2014: Figs. 2, 6, 7.

  • Rukavice sešité z utkané metráže
    Zřejmě nejběžněji používanými rukavicemi byly ty, které byly nastříhány a sešity z utkané metráže a neměly podšití. Bez výjimky jde o palčáky. V současné době evidujeme tři rukavice na Islandu, jednu na Shetlandských ostrovech, jednu v Norsku, dvě v Německu a jednu v Nizozemí. Začněme u islandských. Roku 1881 byla na místě původního statku Garðar na Akranesu nalezena rukavice, kterou by bylo možné zařadit do doby vzniku statku, tedy 9.–10. století (Pálsson 1895: 34–35). Rukavice je čtyřdílná – tvoří ji přední a zadní díl, vložený palec a klín – je levoruká a soudě dle šíře u zápěstí byla nošena přes svrchní oděv. Zajímavostí je, že výrobce na rukavice použil čtyřvazný kepr se zatkanými krátkými chomáči vyčesané vlny, které plnily izolační úlohu (Guðjónsson 1962: 21–22). Zbylé dvě islandské rukavice byly nalezeny pohromadě a tvoří tak zřejmě jediný dochovaný pár. Nalezeny byly na Heynesu roku 1960 (Guðjónsson 1962: 16). Evidentně se jedná o dětské rukavice a jsou spojeny tkanicí, která je k rukavicím přišita a díky které je možné rukavice protáhnout skrze rukávy a dítě tak rukavice neztratí. Materiálem zřejmě recyklovaná látka, která původně měla jinou funkci (Guðjónsson 1962: 30). Rukavice proto mají rozdílné konstrukce : pravá rukavice je vyrobena ze tří dílů (tělo a dva protilehlé kusy tvořící palec), zatímco levá rukavice je ze čtyř dílů (dva protilehlé kusy tvořící tělo a dva protilehlé kusy tvořící palec). Otvory pro palce se nenacházejí na okraji, nýbrž jsou vytvořeny v jistém odstupu.

    Další rukavice z tkané vlny byla nalezena na Shetlandách při dobývání rašeliny (Vikings 2012). Radiokarbonovou metodou byla tato rukavice datována k roku 975, což je bohužel jediný detail, který je nám znám. Roku 2011 byla na tajícím ledovci Lendbreen v Norsku nalezena nejspíše levoruká rukavice, která se podle střízlivých odhadů datuje do období let 800–1000. Zdá se, že tato rukavice byla sešita nejméně ze čtyř dílů : hřbet, palec a dvoudílná dlaň. Jedna německá rukavice byla nalezena v Ralswieku a datuje se do 8.–9. století (Herrmann 1985: 288, Abb. 136). Tato rukavice má po celé délce hřbetu šev a límec kolem zápěstí tvoří samostatný kus. Druhá německá rukavice pochází z hrobu č. 58 z Trossingenu ze 6. století; jedná se zřejmě o prstovou rukavici zhotovenou z červené, žluté a černé látky, která je u okraje obšita koženou aplikací a má vyztužený kožený palec (Peek – Nowak-Böck 2016: 385-390). Zmínit musíme také nejspíše pravorukou rukavici z nizozemského Aalsum, datovanou do 8.–10. století. Není znám jiný detail nežli ten, že osnovní nitě jsou průměrné či malé tloušťky a tudíž i hustoty, zatímco útkové nitě jsou velmi tlusté a tudíž mají velmi malou hustotu na centimetr. Toto řešení, které nejspíše sledovalo šetření materiálem, se vztahuje i k rukavicím z lokality Garðar a ze Shetland. Rukavice z Aalsum nadto byla sešita velmi tlustou nití.

    Nakolik je nám známo, existuje pouze jeden literární doklad o péřových rukavicích z raného středověku. Zmínku o nich můžeme najít v Písni o Haraldovi (sloka 6) Þorbjǫrna hornklofa, která praví, že panovník Harald Krásnovlasý ve svém mládí (či dětských letech) nosil rukavice vycpané prachovým peřím, zřejmě kajčím. Sloka proti sobě staví ostříleného muže, který v zimě neváhá vyplout na moře a bojovat, a zhýčkaného chlapce, který v zimě raději sedí u ohně v ženské části paláce a na rukou má péřové rukavice. Z kontextu takové rukavice můžeme chápat jako součást oblečení bohatého dítěte.

Rukavice z lokality Garðar na Islandu.
Fotografii pořídil dolbex.

Pár rukavic z lokality Heynes na Islandu.
Fotografie byla převzata ze serveru Sarpur.is.


Rukavice ze Shetlandských ostrovů. Vikings 2012.

Rukavice z ledovce Lendbreen v Norsku.
Fotky byly převzaty z katalogu Unimus.no.

Vlněná rukavice z Ralswieku (Herrmann 1985: 288, Abb. 136).


Pravděpodobný vzhled rukavice z hrobu č. 58 z Trossingenu, 6. století.
Peek – Nowak-Böck 2016: Abb. 26.

Rukavice z nizozemského Aalsum.
Brandenburgh 2010: Fig. 22.

Kov

Z raného středověku dochovaly doklady svědčící o raritním použití kovových komponentů u bojových rukavic. První skupinu nálezů tvoří ochrana reprezentovaná kroužkovým pletivem. Nejvýznamnější nález tohoto druhu pochází z hrob č. 8 ze švédského Valsgärde, ve kterém se nacházely chrániče obou nohou a jedné ruky, dříve špatně interpretované jako hrudní pláty (Arwidsson 1939; Arwidsson 1954). Ke chráničům bylo s největší pravděpodobností připevněno ochranné kroužkové pletivo, které bylo u pravé ruky vyvedeno v potah zřejmě kožené rukavice (Vike 2000). Tento nález je datován do 7. století. Do stejného období je datován další pravděpodobný nález, fragment kroužkového pletiva z lombardského hrobu č. 119 v italském Castel Trosinu, který se nacházel poblíž dlaně zemřelého a se svou délkou 13 cm zřejmě chránil hřbet ruky (Beatson 2011–12). Druhou skupinu tvoří lamely kryjící vrchní část ruky, které lze nalézt ve třech lokalitách. První lamely pocházejí z lombardské hrobky z italské lokality Sovizzo. Druhý nález byl učiněn v římské dílně Crypta Balbi, ve které byly nalezeny lamely z pozlaceného bronzu i železa, zřejmě pocházející ze dvou rukavic. Oba tyto lombardské nálezy z Itálie chránily hřbet ruky a byly umístěny souběžně s rukou, nikoli kolmo, což vysvětluje konstantní délku lamel kolem 12-13 cm. Třetí nález lamelových komponentů pochází z nizozemské lokality Lent a od předchozích kusů se liší tím, že se nejsou konstantní délky, takže je možné, že chránily konečky prstů. Pokud bychom naše hledání rozšířili mimo Evropu nebo raný středověk, mohli bychom kupříkladu nalézt segmentové rukavice užívané na území Itálie (3. století) nebo dnešního Íránu (7. století).

Přibližná rekonstrukce ochrany končetin z hrobu Valsgärde 8.
Majitelem je Matt Bunker.

Fragment železného pletiva z hrobu č. 119, Castel Trosino, Itálie.
Zdroj: Cristiano Da Mont’Olmo Carassai.

Lamely z lombardské hrobky z italské lokality Sovizzo a jejich rekonstrukce.
Zdroj: Helvargar.

Lamely z římské lokality Crypta Balbi, 7. století. Pozlacený bronz a železo.
Zdroj: www.fotosar.it.

Fragmenty lamelové rukavice z nizozemské lokality Lent.
Zdroj: Evan Schultheis.

 

Podle tvaru

Podle tvaru můžeme na základě nám známých informací rozdělit rukavice tímto způsobem:

  • Bezprsté rukavice (návleky)
    Jednoduché bezprsté návleky plnící úlohu rukavic zaznamenáváme na území dnešního Nizozemska v případě plstěné rukavice z Dorestadu. O bezprsté formě se spekuluje i v případě finských pletených rukavic, které se nám zachovaly bez palců, což však může být náhoda. K tomuto nálezu jsme nebyly schopni dohledat žádnou středověkou analogii. Důvodem je zřejmě to, že se jednalo o velmi primitivní a nepraktický způsob ochrany rukou.

  • Palčáky
    Různými způsoby konstruovaný palčák se jeví jako nejběžnější tvar rukavice evropského raného středověku a má dlouhé pokračování do dnešních dnů. Předpokládáme jej jak v koženém, tak textilním i kovovém provedení. Specifickou úpravou je palčák, který nechává špičky prstů volné, jenž známe z Kavkazu. Palčák se také vyskytuje v severském mýtu (v souvislosti s mýtem popsaným v Gylfiho oblouzení 45).

  • Prstové rukavice
    Navzdory trossingenskému a kavkazskému exempláři, které jsme ukázali, se prstová forma rukavic se v kontinentální Evropě zřejmě prosadila až ve 12. století. Přes značnou oblibu v období 14.–16. století nejsme v raném středověku schopni potvrdit ani tříprsté rukavice (Williemsen 2015: 18–20).

Podle funkce

Jak již bylo naznačeno, rukavice měly různé funkce. Zde předkládáme jejich nástin:

  • Ochrana proti zimě
    Nejvíce předpokládanou funkcí je zcela jistě protekce vůči chladu. Řada rukavic rozhodně měla za cíl udržet ruku v teple, a tento úkol byl podpořen dodatečnou ochranou – srstí (Stará Ladoga, Sága o Eiríku Zrzavém), zatkávanou vlnou (Garðar) či peřím (Píseň o Haraldovi). Můžeme předpokládat, že dětské rukavice (Heynes, Píseň o Haraldovi) byly určené k tomu, aby udržely ručičky v teple. Jeden z palčáků (Lendbreen) byl nalezen na ledovci, na kterém bylo populární lovit soby, což můžeme rovněž pokládat za jeden z důkazů funkce rukavice. Nadto je palčák vyobrazen na runovém kameni z kostela Sproge (G 373) na Gotlandu z 11. století, který znázorňuje jezdce na saních, který rukou v rukavici ovládá koňské spřežení (Snædal – Gustavson 2013: 43–48).

Koňské spřežení na runovém kameni G 373 ze Sproge, Gotland, 11. století.
Snædal – Gustavson 2013: 45.

  • Práce v chladu a vlhku
    Je logické, že rukavice nebyly v zimě používány pouze při transportu (koně, saně, lyže, brusle, lodě). Uplatnění našly právě na lovu, na lodi při tahání lan, při rybaření, výrobě dehtu, orbě, pastvě, sekání dřeva, dolování rašeliny a dalších venkovních aktivitách, při kterých se člověk mohl dostat do nepříznivého počasí.

  • Kovářství
    Mohli bychom očekával použití rukavic při kování. Tento předpoklad se však nepotvrzuje, neboť raně středověká ikonografie, která zobrazuje kováře, je zachycuje bez rukavic, někdy též s vyhrnutými rukávy. Nejbližší materiál nacházíme v severském mýtu, kde se objevují železné rukavice, s jejichž pomocí lze uchopit rozžhavené železo (Jazyk básnický 26).

  • Sokolnictví
    Při vznešeném umění sokolnictví se odnepaměti užívají kožené rukavice, které prokazují lepší vlastnosti vůči dravčímu stisku. Z raně středověké Evropy, nakolik je nám známo, existují pouze dva doklady používání sokolnických rukavic. V obou případech jde o palčáky. Starší z nich je vyobrazen na byzantské mozaice tzv. Vily sokolníka v řeckém Argosu, datované do 6. století (Wallis 2017: Illus. 2). Mladší scéna je vyobrazena na anglosaském kříži v anglickém Bewcastle a je datována do 7.-8. století (Wallis 2017: 430). Ve zbytku sokolnických scén, například na výšivce z Bayeux, lidé rukavice nenosí a mají dravce přímo na rukou (Owen-Crocker 2004: 265). Rukavice se neobjevují ani ve skaldských kenninzích, které mají souvislost se sokolnictvím. Je tedy třeba si položit otázku, zda tyto kulturní produkty znázorňují realitu věrohodně. Sokolnické scény z 12. století a následujícího období již vyobrazují prstové rukavice (např. Schnack 1998: 48).


Mozaika z Vily sokolníka na řeckém Argosu, 6. století (Wallis 2017: Illus. 2).


Sokolnická scéna na kříži z Bewcastlu.
Převzato z greatenglishchurches.co.uk.

  • Ochrana v boji
    Přes řadu historických paralel a zdravý rozum nejsme schopni prokázat jiné než raritní užívání ochranných rukavic ve střetu. Jediné výjimky tvoří rukavice pokryté kroužkovým pletivem a lamelami. Nakolik se zdá, absence bitevních rukavic v pramenech není způsobena zubem času, nýbrž jiným přístupem k problému. Bojující podle všeho preferovali jemnou motoriku, v soubojích se dokázali efektivně krýt štíty a v šiku využívali především kombinací štítů a tyčových zbraní. Co je však nejdůležitější, žádná tehdejší varianta rukavice nedokázala plnohodnotně ochránit vůči veškerým typům zbraním. Problematikou jsme se již detailněji zabývali zde. Tentýž problém provází i lukostřelecké rukavice, které nemůžeme potvrdit.

  • Součást honosného oděvu
    Rukavice však současně mohly plnit estetickou úlohu, zejména na rukou mocných a bohatých. Viděli jsme, že rukavice byly dělány na míru, mohly být barveny, vyšívány (finské rukavice), pošívány drahými materiály (Moščevaja Balka) či plněny luxusní vycpávkou (Píseň o Haraldovi). Do jisté míry se tak rukavice mohly stát známkou statutu, obzvláště u panovníků a církevních představitelů je toto patrné. Zmíníme zde dvě názorné ukázky. Rukavice figurují v závěti anglosaského šlechtice Byrhtnotha, který odkazuje „pár dovedně vyrobených rukavic“ (Owen-Crocker 2004: 265), a jsou darem i v Sáze o Njálovi (31), kde král věnuje kožené rukavice vyšívané zlatem.


Bibliografie

Prameny

Gylfiho oblouzení = Gylfiho oblouzení. Přel. Helena Kadečková. In: Snorri Sturluson. Edda a Sága o Ynglinzích. Praha: Argo, 2003, 37–101.

Jazyk básnický = Jazyk básnický. Přel. Helena Kadečková. In: Snorri Sturluson. Edda a Sága o Ynglinzích, Praha: Argo, 2003, 102–144.

Sága o Eiríku Zrzavém = Sága o Eiríkovi Zrzavém. Přel. Ladislav Heger. In: Staroislandské ságy, Praha, 1965: 15–34.

Sága o Njálovi = Sága o Njálovi. Přel. Ladislav Heger. In: Staroislandské ságy, Praha, 1965: 321–559.

Þorbjǫrn hornklofi : Píseň o Haraldovi = Þorbjǫrn hornklofi : Haraldskvæði (Hrafnsmál), ed. R. D. Fulk. In: Skaldic poetry of the Scandinavian Middle Ages. Vol. 1, [Poetry from the kings’ sagas 1 : from mythical times to c. 1035], ed. Diana Whaley, Turnhout, 2012: 91117.

Literatura

Arwidsson 1939 = Arwidsson, Greta (1939). Armour of the Vendel period. In: Acta Archaeologica 10, København, 31–59.

Arwidsson 1954 = Arwidsson, Greta (1954). Valsgärde 8. Uppsala: Almqvist & Wiksells Boktryckeri.

Beatson 2011–12 = Beatson, Peter (2011–12). Armour in Byzantium in the early years of the Varangian Guard, with special reference to limb defenses. Dostupné z: http://members.ozemail.com.au/~chrisandpeter/limb_defences/limb_defences.htm.

Brandenburgh 2010 = Brandenburgh, Chrystel R. (2010). Early medieval textile remains from settlements in the Netherlands. An evaluation of textile production. In: Journal of Archaeology in the Low Countries 2/1, 41–79.

Dahlbäck 1983 = Dahlbäck, Göran (red.) (1983). Helgeandsholmen : 1000 år i Stockholms ström, Stockholm.

Dürrich – Menzel 1847 = Dürrich, Ferdinand von – Menzel, Wolfgang (1847). Die Heidengräber am Lupfen (bei Oberflacht), Stuttgart : Arnold.

Gillich et al. 2008 = Gillich, Antje – Peek, Christine – Planck, Dieter – Walter, Susanne (2008). Kleidung im frühen Mittelalter: Am liebsten schön bunt! (Porträt Archäologie), Esslingen am Neckar.

Guðjónsson 1962 = Guðjónsson, E.E. (1962). Forn röggvarvefnaður. In: Árbók Hins íslenzka fornleifafélags 1962, Reykjavík, 12–71.

Hald 1951 = Hald, Maragrethe (1951). Vötturinn frá Arnheiðarstöðum. In: Árbók Hins íslenzka fornleifafélags 1949–50, Reykjavík, 73–77.

Herrmann 1985 = Herrmann, Joachim (1985). Die Slawen in Deutschland. Geschichte und Kultur der slawischen Stämme westlich von Oder und Neisse vom VI. bis XII. Jahrhundert. Ein Handbuch, Berlin.

Kajitani 2001 = Kajitani, Nobuko (2001). A Man’s Caftan and Leggings from the North Caucasus of the Eight to Tenth Century: A Conservator’s Report. In: Metropolitan Museum Journal 36, 85–124.

Jerusalimskaja 2012 = Иерусалимская, А.А. (2012). Мощевая Балка. Необычный археологический памятник на Северокавказском шёлковом пути, СПб.

Martin 1988 = Martin, Max (1988). Bemerkungen zur frühmittelalterlichen Knochenschnalle eines Klerikergrabes der St. Verenakirche von Zurzach (Kt. Aargau). In: Jahrbuch der Schweizerischen Gesellschaft für Ur- und Frühgeschichte 71, 161–177

Miedema 1980 = Miedema, M. (1980). Textile finds from Dorestad, Hoogstraat I and II. In: W. A. van Es – W. J. H. Verwers (eds). Excavations at Dorestad I, The Harbour: Hoogstraat I, (Nederlandse Oudheden 9), Amersfoort, 250–261.

Mord im Mittelalter 2012 = Mord im Mittelalter – Das Fürstengrab von Greding (Hans Peter Kernstock, Německo, 2012), rozhovor s Britt Nowak-Böck, 0:12:54–0:17:19.

Mould et al. 2003 = Mould, Q., Carlisle, I, Cameron, E. (2003). Craft Industry and Everyday Life: Leather and Leatherworking in Anglo-Scandinavian and Medieval York. The small finds 17/16, York.

Ojateva 1965 = Оятева, Е.И. (1965). Обувь и другие кожаные изделия Земляного городища Старой Ладоги //Археологический сборник Государственного Эрмитажа, вып. 7, 42–59.

Owen-Crocker 2004 = Owen-Crocker, Gale R. (2004). Dress in Anglo-Saxon England, Woodbridge : The Boydell Press.

Pálsson 1895 = Pálsson, Pálma (1895). Um myndir af gripum í forngripasafninu. In: Árbók Hins íslenzka fornleifafélags 1895, Reykjavík, 30–35.

Peek – Nowak-Böck 2016 = Peek, Christian – Nowak-Böck, Britt (2016). Die Untersuchungen an organischen Materialien des Grabes 58 von Trossingen (Lkr. Tuttlingen) – Vorbericht. In: Fundberichte aus Baden-Württemberg, Bd. 36, Esslingen am Neckar, 367-404.

Schnack 1998 = Schnack, Christiane (1998). Mittelalterliche Lederfunde aus Schleswig: Futterale, Riemen, Taschen und andere Objekte ; Ausgrabung Schild 1971–1975. Ausgrabungen in Schleswig Berichte und Studien 13, Neumünster.

Snædal – Gustavson 2013 = Snædal, Thorgunn – Gustavson, Helmer (2013). Supplement till Gotlands runinskrifter 1 : Sudertredingen : G 360 – G 386 samt tillägg till inskrifterna G 32, G 49, G 50, G 76, G 79, och G 104, Stockholm : Riksantikvarieämbetet.
Dostupné z: https://www.raa.se/app/uploads/2013/09/27_sudertr.pdf

Vajanto 2014 = Vajanto, Krista (2014). Nålbinding in Prehistoric Burials – Reinterpreting Finnish 11th–14th-century AD Textile Fragments. In: Janne Ikäheimo, Anna-Kaisa Salmi & Tiina Äikäs (eds.). Sounds Like Theory. XII Nordic Theoretical Archaeology Group Meeting in Oulu 25.–28.4.2012. Monographs of the Archaeological Society of Finland 2, 21–33.

Vike 2000 = Vike, Vegard (2000). Ring weave : A metallographical analysis of ring mail material at the Oldsaksamlingen in Oslo, Oslo [vysokoškolská práce]. Dostupné z:
http://folk.uio.no/vegardav/brynje/Ring_Weave_Vegard_Vike_2000_(translated_Ny_Bj%C3%B6rn_Gustafsson).pdf.

Vikings 2012 = Vikings, epizoda 3 (Jon Eastman – Rosie Schellenburg – Simon Winchcombe, Velká Británie, 2012), diskuze Niela Olivera s Dr. Ianem Taitem, 0:08:30–0:10:41.

Wallis 2017 = Wallis, R. J. (2017). “As the Falcon Her Bells” at Sutton Hoo? Falconry in Early Anglo-Saxon England. In: Archaeological Journal, 174 (2), 409–436.

Walton 1989 = Walton, Penelope (1989). Textiles, Cordage and Raw Fibre from 16-22 Coppergate. York Archaeological Trust: 17/05, London.

Werner 1977 = Werner, Joachim (Hrsg.) (1977). Die Ausgrabungen in St. Ulrich und Afra in Augsburg 1961-1968, Augsburg.

Williemsen 2015 = Williemsen, Annemarieke (2015). The Geoff Egan Memorial Lecture 2013 : Taking up the glove: finds, uses and meanings of gloves, mittens and gauntlets in western Europe, c. AD 1300–1700. In: Post-Medieval Archaeology 49/1, 1–36.

Bojové rukavice – tehdy a dnes

Sepsal Roman Král, editoval Tomáš Vlasatý, 2015

Do předchozího článku Ochrana končetin: tehdy a dnes nebyly rukavice zahrnuty, ačkoli z něj vyplývá, že raně středověcí bojovníci věnovaly ochraně svých končetin jenom málo pozornosti, a proto nejsme schopni zaznamenat jejich ochranné prvky. Na zmíněný článek navazuje příspěvek Romana Krále, který názorně ukazuje, jak by se mělo přistupovat k používání rukavic v moderních historických bitvách.


V raném středověku střední, západní a severní Evropy nemáme doloženou žádnou sofistikovanou ochranu rukou, respektive dlaní, hřbetu ruky a zápěstí. Chybí hmotné archeologické nálezy a ani případné iluminace nenasvědčují žádné ochraně rukou. Předpokladem je, že ochrana končetin nebyla primárním zájmem tehdejších bojovníků, ačkoli vystrčené končetiny pravděpodobně bývaly častým terčem úderů. Navíc musíme vzít v potaz, že v minulých dobách se používalo ostrých zbraní a ne jako dnes tupých replik, čili způsob boje se velkým způsobem lišil a určitě věděli jak dobové zbraně používat tak, aby nebylo nutné si ruce tolik chránit. Rozhodně lze předpokládat, že nestavěli své ruce do dráhy úderům a drobné šrámy a oděrky přeci bojovníka trápit nebudou.

V dnešním reenactmentu ovšem vyvstává potřeba si ruce a prsty chránit, jelikož nikdo nechce po bojovém víkendu odjet se zpřelámanými prsty či zlomeným zápěstím. Pak se tedy vyrábí různé ochrany rukou v podobě rukavic různě zesílených přes prsty a hřbet ruky, ovšem v mnoha případech už je zesílení přehnané a takováto ochrana rukou už působí velice rušivě. Je to v případech, kdy je rukavice předimenzovaná (takovouto rukavici zde nazýváme „hokejovou“), je na ruce neskutečně silná, až nepřirozená vrstva, vlnou počínaje a kovovými lamelami konče. Toto řešení nejenže je už pro historičnost opravdu nevzhledné, ale také má jistý nešťastný následek, rány do končetin se stávají téměř naprosto necitelnými, a tudíž svádí bojovníky, aby vystrkovali ruce do dráhy úderů a nedbali na zásahy do rukou a prstů, jelikož dnes tato místo nejsou zásahovou plochou a úder se tedy nepočítá.

Jelikož tedy není dochovaná žádná ochrana rukou, je příhodné při takovéto dnešní ochraně vycházet alespoň z dobových střihů, např. zimních rukavic. Máme zmínky také o (nejspíše kožených) veslařských či sokolnických rukavicích. Takovéto střihy jsou zpravidla tvaru palčáků. Základ doporučujeme udělat z tenké kůže, kvůli dobrému úchopu a ovladatelnosti zbraně. Jako zesilovací vrstvu je vhodné použít jeden plát kůže, nikoli silné kožené segmenty, které by narušily vzhled jednoduchého palčáku. Je spíše vhodnější použít tenčí kůži, maximálně 2–3 mm, a v případě potřeby je možné ji vytvrdit např. včelím voskem. Plát kůže by měl ale nejlépe kopírovat siluetu ruky s nataženými prsty a neměl by moc přesahovat, opět z důvodu dobrého úchopu a užívání zbraně.

V lepším případě je asi dobrou variantou řešit ochranu rukou různými omoty. Ať už silnými vlněnými ovínkami, nebo koženými řemeny, ovšem tato řešení mají nevýhodu, a sice tu, že mohou stěžovat úchop zbraně a v případě vlny mohou dřevěné násady zbraní v rukou klouzat. Ve výsledku nejde o to vytvořit repliky původní ochrany rukou, protože ta se nepoužívala, nýbrž jde o to, aby celková rukavice působila co nejméně rušivě a vycházela ze střihů rukavic, které byly reálně používány, byť v úplně jiných situacích.


Dodatek editora: Ve východoevropských bitvách se ujaly jednoduché kožené palčáky, které lze spatřit v následující galerii. Další možností mohou být palčáky z plsti nebo prošívaných vrstvených textilií. V poslední řadě nesmíme zapomínat na rukavice s nýtovaným kroužkovým pletivem (které byly zřejmě připevněny k nátepníkům v hrobu Valsgärde 8, který se datuje do 7. století), které byly před jistou dobou zakázány; a to poněkud neuváženě, protože jde o historickou, funkční a oproti „hokejovým“ rukavicím střízlivě vypadající ochranu rukou, kterou lze doložit v pozdějších (a s přihlédnutím k hrobu Valsgärde 8 dost možná i dřívějších) obdobích. Zájemce odkazuji na přehledný článek, který vytvořila skupina Comitatus.

Tímto bych rád všechny čtenáře vybídl k diskuzi na toto téma. Všichni šermující reenactoři, kteří se zabývají raným středověkem, dobře vědí, že „hokejové“ rukavice nejsou historicky věrohodné, ale přesto jsou používány a tolerovány. Možným důvodem je podoba boje – bojovníci se obávají o své ruce, neumějí své ruce krýt a jejich oponenti záměrně cílí na jejich ruce. Tento přístup se nám nelíbí a domníváme se, že by měl být změněn jak ze strany organizátorů bitev, tak ze strany samotných bojovníků. Ještě před několika lety se na bojištích vyskytovaly jedinci (a ojediněle se vyskytují i dnes), kteří nepoužívaly ochranu rukou vůbec. Jako dlouholetý účastník bitev mohu potvrdit, že podoba boje se vyvíjí a jednotlivé části zbroje se jí pod tíhou stále nových požadavků přizpůsobují.