The helmet from Lokrume, Gotland

Since I am deeply interested in Viking Age helmets, I realized there is no comprehensive article about the helmet from Lokrume. That’s why I decided to translate my Czech article, “Přilba z Lokrume“. I believe this might help to reenactors looking for new kind of helmet evidence.

The first information about the fragment from Lokrume, which is deposited in Visby museum with the sign GF B 1683, was first published by Fornvännen journal in 1907:

„The helmet fragment (consisting of eyebrows and the nasal) from iron is coated with silver plate decorated with niello ornaments. The item, which belongs to Visby Fornsal and which was found in Lokrume parish on Gotland, is the only Viking Age helmet fragment ever found and it is an interesting parallel to several hundreds older helmets from Vendel. (Fornvännen 1907: 208, Fig. 8)

1

Taken from Fornvännen 1907: 208, Fig. 8; Lindqvist 1925: 194, Fig. 97.

Some time later, in 1925, Sune Lindqvist discussed the helmet in his essay on Vendel Period helmets (Lindqvist 1925: 192–194, Fig. 97): „it is made of iron and it is most likely made on Continent, because it is decorated with a thin layer of silver. In Scandinavia, this method was first used in the Viking Age“ (Lindqvist 1925: 192–193). He noticed also the fact that eyebrows do not have animal head terminals, like the helmet from Broa (Lindqvist 1925: 194).

Sigurd Grieg, who studied the helmet from Gjermundbu, reacted to Lindqvist in his book:

In this moment, is is also interesting to mention the Viking Age fragment from Lokrume, Gotland, which was discussed by Lindquist, together with some other helmets. The piece is dated to the Viking Age and the decoration also shows it belongs to the period. The fragment consists of eyebrows and a part of nasal. The fragment is very interesting for us, because its ornaments show the similarity with ornaments known from the sword from Lipphener See (…).
Lindqvist presumes the fragment is an export from the Continent, because the thin silver plate decoration was not used in Scandinavia before the Viking Age. Gutorm Gjessing critised this, when he truthfully said: ‚In our opinion, the helmet fragment from Lokrume can not be understood as a predecessor to Vendel Period helmets, as Lindqvist did (…). The technique – coating with thin silver layer and niello decoration – is very well known from the Viking Age and it is obvious that this technique was very popular on Gotland during its quite extensive production of weapons in the Later Viking Age (…).’“ (Grieg 1947: 44–45)

Grieg, who quotes Gjessing, finds the analogies of the helmet fragment in the 10th century, more precisely, Saint Wenceslas helmet and Petersen type S sword from Lipphener See (Grieg 1947: 45). The most similar analogies of the motive can be found on Petersen type S swords from Poland, Czech Republic, Hungary and Ukraine.

lokrume_motiv

The reconstruction of the motive, made by Jan Zbránek.

Elisabeth Munksgaard, who wrote a paper on the helmet fragment from Tjele in 1984, mentioned the fragment from Lokrume without any detail (Munksgaard 1984: 87). Almost the same did Dominik Tweddle (Tweedle 1992: 1126), who mentioned the facts the fragment is decorated and does not have animal head terminals.

The most important work presents Die Wikingerzeit Gotlands, written by Lena Thunmark-Nylén. It consists of a detailed photo, dimensions and a commentary (WZG II: 264:1; III: 317; IV: 521–522):

Lokrume parish, GF B 1683
An eyebrow protection from a helmet; made of iron inlayed with silver and nielloed with decoration in shape of airborne braided bands and intertwined circles ; the lenght of 13.2 cm.“ (WZG IV: 521–522)

An eyebrow part of a helmet, without any knowledge of the find context, represents the only example of the Viking Age helmet on Gotland. The item is made of iron, decorated with square inlay, to which a niello band motive is placed. There are transverse bands in the other areas around eyes.“ (WZG III: 317)

Thunmark-Nylén seeks analogies within the corpus of Norwegian swords, and she comes with the conclusion that the dating to the Viking Age is more than clear and without any doubt (WZG III: 317, Note 75).

2

Taken from WZG II: 264:1.

Mattias Frisk, the author of a very good university essay on Scandinavian helmets from the Younger Iron Age (Frisk 2012), wrote the same information as Lindqvist:

„The fragment consists of eyebrows and a short, broken nasal. It is made of iron, coated with silver plate, which is inlayed with square ornaments (…).“ (Frisk 2012: 23)

To my knowledge, the last book to mention the fragment is Vikinger i Krig, written by Kim Hjardar and Vegard Vike (Hjardar – Vike 2011: 188, 190). The book presents a different lenght (12.8 cm), a quite detailed photo and a short comment:

The second stray find is the mask fragment from Lokrume, Gotland, which is decorated with an ornament, that could be dated to 950–1000 AD. (…) The mask from Lokrume is made of iron, coated with silver and inlayed with square ornament and transverse bands of copper.“ (Hjardar – Vike 2011: 188)

vikingerikrig190

Taken from Hjardar – Vike 2011: 190.

We can see that different authors hold different opinions on the method of the decoration:

  • coating/plating with silver + niello inlay (Fornvännen 1907; Lindqvist 1925; Grieg 1947; Frisk 2011; Hjardar – Vike 2011)
  • silver inlay + niello inlay (WZG IV: 521–522; WZG III: 317)

When I discussed the fragment with blacksmith and jeweller Petr Floriánek (also known as Gullinbursti), the living legend and the best knower of the Viking art in the Czech republic, he explained to me that the decoration could be made in two possible ways:

  • inlay method: grooves are cut to the surface of the item, and they are filled with contrastive material (precious metal) in a desirable shape. Grooves correspond to the motive. The example can be seen here.
  • overlay method: a grid is cut to the surface of the item, and the material is hammered to the grid in a desirable shape. Grooves of the grid do not correspond to the motive. An example can be seen here, or below.
lokrume_muzeum

The fragment, deposited in Visby Fornsal.

According to Petr Floriánek, both methods were popular in the Viking Age and they can be seen applied on many pieces of art, mostly weapons of the second part of the 10th century. The usage of niello, proposed by researchers, is not so likely, in Petr’s opinion. The reason for that is the fact that grooves (with missing material) have the uniform width, which rather suggests the usage of wire. The material could be copper, because copper is more like to fall off, since it has worse adhesion than silver. As Petr says, broad transverse bands are most likely not made by niello method.

lokrume9

The back side of the fragment. Taken from Gotlands Museums samling av fotografier och föremål.

It is important to stress that it is not known to which type of helmet the fragment belonged. Researchers tend to say it was a spectacle helmet, which seem to be a more reliable variant, judging from shapes and dimensions of analogies (Broa, Gjermundbu, Tjele, Kyiv). Petr Floriánek guess the thickness of the mask can be cca 3 mm. The usage of nasal without ocular parts is known from Saint Wenceslas helmet, which was also made on Gotland and its decoration is very similar (see here). That’s why we should not dismiss the nasal variant.

My Belarusian friend Dmitry Hramtsov (also known as Truin Stenja), a very skillful blacksmith and jeweller, made a quite interesting variation of Lokrume helmet. Me and Petr consider this version to be very well done. Dmitry used the overlay method – in photos, you can notice the cut grid with silver and copper wire hammered to the surface. The mask is hollow inside. The mask is riveted with four rivets to the dome of the helmet; two rivets are invisible and soldered with silver. The rest of the mask is based on Kyiv mask, which was made in the same period. The dome of the helmet is based on the construction of Gjermundbu helmet.

 

In the very end, I would like to thank to Dmitry Hramtsov for the chance to publish his photos. My deep respect belong to Petr Floriánek, who gave me many good advices and ideas. Finally, my thanks go to Pavel Vorinin for the photo of the back side of the fragment and to Jan Zbránek for the redrawn motive. I hope you liked this article. In case of any question or remark, please contact me or leave a comment below. If you want to learn more and support my work, please, fund my project on Patreon.


Bibliography

Fornvännen 1907 = Ur främmande samlingar 2. In: Fornvännen 2, Stockholm 1907, 205–208. Available on: http://samla.raa.se/xmlui/bitstream/handle/raa/5533/1907_205.pdf?sequence=1.

FRISK, Mattias (2012). Hjälmen under yngre järnåldern : härkomst, förekomst och bruk, Visby: Högskolan på Gotland. Available on: http://www.diva-portal.org/smash/get/diva2:541128/FULLTEXT01.pdf.

GRIEG, Sigurd (1947). Gjermundbufunnet : en høvdingegrav fra 900-årene fra Ringerike, Oslo.

HJARDAR, Kim – VIKE, Vegard (2011). Vikinger i krig, Oslo.

LINDQVIST, Sune (1925). Vendelhjälmarnas ursprung. In: Fornvännen 20, Stockholm, 181–207. Available on: http://samla.raa.se/xmlui/bitstream/handle/raa/796/1925_181.pdf?sequence=1.

MUNKSGAARD, Elisabeth (1984). A Viking Age smith, his tools and his stock-in-trade. In: Offa 41, Neumünster, 85–89.

TWEDDLE, Dominic (1992). The Anglian Helmet from 16-22 Coppergate, The Archaeology of York. The Small Finds AY 17/8, York.

WZG II = Thunmark-Nylén, Lena (1998). Die Wikingerzeit Gotlands II : Typentafeln, Stockholm.

WZG III = Thunmark-Nylén, Lena (2006). Die Wikingerzeit Gotlands III: 1–2 : Text, Stockholm.

WZG IV = Thunmark-Nylén, Lena (2000). Die Wikingerzeit Gotlands IV:1–3 : Katalog, Stockholm.

The helmet from Gjermundbu

On March 30 1943, Universitetets Oldsaksamling in Oslo gained the information that a farmer named Lars Gjermundbo found and dug into a huge mound on his land near the farm of Gjermundbu, Buskerud county, southern Norway. The place was examined by archaeologists (Marstrander and Blindheim) the next month and the result was really fascinating.

gjerm1

The plan of the mound. Taken from Grieg 1947: Pl. I.

The mound was 25 meters long, 8 meters broad in the widest place and 1.8 meters high in the middle part. The most of the mound was formed by stony soil; however, the interior of the middle part was paved with large stones. Some stones were found even on the surface of the mound. In the middle part, about one meter below the surface and under the stone layer, the first grave was discovered, so called Grav I. 8 meters from Grav I, in the western part of the mound, the second grave was found, Grav II. Both graves represent cremation burials from the 2nd half of the 10th century and are catalogized under the mark C27317. Both graves were documented by Sigurd Grieg in Gjermundbufunnet : en høvdingegrav fra 900-årene fra Ringerike in 1947.

Grav I consists of dozens of objects connected to personal ownership and various activities, including fighting, archery, horse riding, playing games and cooking. Among others, the most interesting are unique objects, like the chain-mail and the helmet, which became very famous and are mentioned or depicted in every relevant publication.

Předpokládaná rekonstrukce bojovníka uloženého v Gjermundbu, 10. století. Podle

Possible reconstruction of the gear that was found in Grav I, Gjermundbu. Taken from Hjardar – Vike 2011: 155. The shape of the aventail is the weak point of the reconstruction.

© 2016 Kulturhistorisk museum, UiO

The helmet is often described as the only complete helmet known from the Viking Age. Unfortunately, it is not true, for at least two reasons. Firstly, the helmet is not by any means complete – it shows heavy damage and consists of only 17 fragments in the current state, which means one-fourth or one-third of the helmet. To be honest, fragments of the helmet are glued onto a plaster matrix (some of them in the wrong position) that has the rough form of the original helmet. Careless members of academia present this version as a reconstruction in the museum and in books, and this trend is then copied by reenactors and the general public. I have to agree with Elisabeth Munksgaard (Munksgaard 1984: 87), who wrote: “The Gjermundbu helmet is neither well preserved nor restored.

The current state of the helmet. Picture taken by Vegard Vike.

Secondly, there are at least 5 other published fragments of helmets spread across Scandinavia and areas with strong Scandinavian influence (see the article Scandinavian helmets of the 10th century). I am aware of several unpublished depictions and finds, whose reliability can not be proven. Especially, helmet fragments found in Tjele, Denmark, are very close to Gjermundbu helmet, since they consist of a mask and eight narrow metal bands 1 cm wide (see the article The helmet from Tjele). Based on the Gjermundbu helmet, Tjele helmet fragments and Kyiv mask (the shape of the original form of Lokrume fragment is unknown), we can clearly say that spectacle helmet type with decorated mask evolved from Vendel Period helmets and was the most dominant type of Scandinavian helmet until 1000 AD, when conical helmets with nasals became popular.

gjermbu8

An old reconstruction of the helmet, made by Erling Færgestad. Taken from Grieg 1947: Pl. VI.

To be fair, the helmet from Gjermundbu is the only spectacle type helmet of the Viking Age, whose construction is completely known. Let’s have a look at it!

gjermundbu

The scheme of the helmet. Made by Tomáš Vlasatý and Tomáš Cajthaml.

My mate Tomáš Cajthaml made a very nice scheme of the helmet, according to my instructions. The scheme is based on Grieg´s illustration, photos saved in the Unimus catalogue and observations made by researcher Vegard Vike.

The dome of the helmet is formed by four triangular-shaped plates (dark blue). Under the gap between each two plates, there is a narrow flat band, which is riveted to a somewhat curved band located above the gap between each two plates (yellow). In the nape-forehead direction, the flat band is formed by a single piece, that is extended in the middle (on the top of the helmet) and forms the base for the spike (light bluethe method of attaching the spike is not known to me). There are two flat bands in the lateral direction (green). Triangular-shaped plates are riveted to each corner of the extended part of the nape-forehead band. A broad band, with visible profiled line, is riveted to the rim of the dome (red; it is not known how the ends of this piece of metal connected to each other). Two rings were connected to the very rim of the broad band, probably remnants of the aventail. In the front, the decorated mask is riveted onto the broad band.

© 2016 Kulturhistorisk museum, UiO

Since all known dimensions are shown in the scheme, let me add some supplementary facts. Firstly, four somewhat curved bands are shown a bit differently in the scheme – they are more curved in the middle part and tapering near ends. Secondly, the spike is a very important feature and rather a matter of aesthetic than practical usage. Regarding the aventail, rings have the spacing of at least 2 cm. On contrary to chain-mail, rings from the helmet are very thick and probably butted, since no trace of rivets were found. It can not be said whether they represent the aventail, and if so, what it looked like and whether the aventail was hanging on rings or on a wire that was drawn through the rings (see my article about hanging devices of early medieval aventails). Talking about the mask, X-ray showed at least 40 lines, which form eyelashes, similarly to Lokrume helmet mask (see the article The helmet from Lokrume). In spite of modern tendencies, neither traces of metal inlay nor droplets of melted metal were found. The mask shows a two-part construction, overlaped and forge-welded at each temple and in the nose area (according to the X-ray picture taken by Vegard Vike). There is a significant difference between the thickness of plates and bands and the mask; even the mask shows uneven thickness. Initially, the surface of the helmet could be polished, according to Vegard Vike.

I believe these notes will help to the new generation of more accurate reenactors. Not counting rings, the helmet could be formed from 14 pieces and at least 33 rivets. Such a construction is a bit surprising and seems not so solid. In my opinion, this fact will lead to the discussion of reenactors whether the helmet represents a war helmet or rather a ceremonial / symbolical helmet. I personally think there is no need to see those two functions as separated.

I am very indebted to my friends Vegard Vike, who answered all my annoying question, young artist and reenactor Tomáš Cajthaml and Samuel Collin-Latour. I hope you liked reading this article. If you have any question or remark, please contact me or leave a comment below. If you want to learn more and support my work, please, fund my project on Patreon.


Bibliography

GRIEG, Sigurd (1947). Gjermundbufunnet : en høvdingegrav fra 900-årene fra Ringerike, Oslo.

HJARDAR, Kim – VIKE, Vegard (2011). Vikinger i krig, Oslo.

MUNKSGAARD, Elisabeth (1984). A Viking Age smith, his tools and his stock-in-trade. In: Offa 41, Neumünster, 85–89.

Scandinavian helmets of the 10th century

In this article, we will have a short look at evidences of helmets used in Scandinavia during the 10th century. Pictures of modern replicas are added as well.

Spectacle helmets:

Nasal helmets:

Unknown types:

Russian helmets in Scandinavia:

Conclusion

Bibliography


Spectacle helmets

Gnëzdovo

Object, context A head on the sacrificial (or weaving?) knife from Gnëzdovo, Russia, mound number 74. 2nd half of the 10th century.
Description The head is rather schematic. Fechner writes, that the head is covered with a helmet that has typical hemisphere shape with spectacle mask. No visible spike on the top, no visible decoration. Sizov´s picture shows rather a head with beard.
Literature Fechner 1965; Sizov 1902: 91, Fig. 59, 60.

 

Gjermundbu

Object, context The only complete Viking Age helmet found in Gjermundbu mound 1, Norway. 2nd half of the 10th century.
Description The dome is made from 4 pieces connected with 4 quadrant ribs of semicircular section. There is a spike on the top and a plate connected to the rim of the dome. The mask is from one piece, is decorated with silvar inlay and is riveted to the plate. There are some traces of the rings on the plate, indicating that a kind of neck guard was used.
Literature Grieg 1947; Tweddle 1992: 1125-1128; Vlasatý 2016

 

Tjele

 

Object, context A mask fragment found among the forging equipment in Tjele, Denmark 2nd half of the 10th century.
Description Iron mask decorated with bronze plates. The nasal is broken. It is possible there were some rivets on the nasal, indicating the mask was made from several pieces.
Literature Kirpichnikov 1973Tweddle 1992. 1126, 1128; Vlasatý 2015b.

 

Kyiv

Object, context A mask from a helmet found in Desjatinna Church in Kyiv, Ukraine. 2nd half of the 10th century.
Description Iron mask decorated with silver and gold coating and silver inlay. The nasal is broken. It is sure there were some rivets on the nasal, indicating the mask was made from several pieces. Some people suggest reversed position of the mask.
Literature Kirpichnikov 1973Tweddle 1992. 1126, 1129; Vlasaty 2018a.

 

Nasal helmets

Middleton

Object, context A Scandinavian (Anglo-Scandinavian?) warrior depicted on the Middleton Cross B, England. 10th century.
Description The head is rather schematic. The helmet has conical shape with integral nasal. No visible decoration.
Literature Graham-Campbell 1980: cat. no. 537.

 

Prague

Object, context The so-called helmet of Saint Wenceslaus. The nasal and the rim are probably of Gotlandic origin, 2nd half of the 10th century, the dome is later addition (but the original dome might be similar).
Description Both nasal and rim are decorated with silver inlay and coating. The decoration of the rim resembles the piece from Lokrume. The figure on the nasal is important example of mixing pagan religion with Christianity.
Literature Hejdová 1964; Vlasaty 2018b.

 

Unknown types

Lokrume

Object, context A mask fragment from a helmet found in Lokrume, Gotland. 2nd half of the 10th century.
Description Iron fragment richly decorated with silver and copper inlay/overlay. The nasal is broken. It is impossible to claim whether the fragment belonged to spectacle or nasal helmets.
Literature Lindqvist 1925; Vlasatý 2015c.

 

Birka

Object, context A fragment of what could be an aventail holder. Found in the hall in Birka, 950 – 970 AD.
Description Gilded iron plate with teeth on one side. A hole for the rivet is visible. This fragment could be used as an aventail holder that can be seen on some early medieval helmets.
Literature Vlasatý 2015a.

 

Russian helmets in Scandinavia

Birka

Object, context Fragments of what could be a Russian helmet. Found in the hall of Birka. 950-970 AD.
Description Two gilded fragments decorated with birds and a flower and one tinned bronze conus. Rests of silvers and iron rivets are still present. It is impossible to claim whether these fragments belonged to one or two helmets.
Literature Holmquist Olausson – Petrovski 2007; Vlasatý 2014.

 

Conclusion

The number of the evidence is sufficient to claim there were 3 types of helmets in Scandinavia during the 10th century. Spectacle helmet was the most dominant and traditional type, nasal helmets probably represent a new Continental fashion and Russian helmets (like spectacle helmets in Gnëzdovo and Kyiv) form the evidence of close relations between Eastern Europe and Eastern Scandinavia. Spectacle helmets were used until 1000 AD, conical helmets with nasals became widespread in the 11th century (Munksgaard 1984: 88).

It has to be stressed that all examples are richly decorated – we can not find any proof of undecorated examples. Undecorated helmets used in 10th century reenactment are rather a reeenactism. Even the nasal of the Saint Wenceslaus helmet is decorated, even though there is no other proof of decorated conical helmet with a nasal. The tradition of helmet decoration has to be seen as important; it is obvious that decorated masks had been used to terrify oponents and to show exceptional status.

We can not see any cheek guards or chainmail aventails on masks – these devices were used on finds from different centuries and were not used in the 10th century.

Old Norse literature, mainly skaldic poetry, can bring some interesting facts as well. For example, Norwegian king Hákon the Good († 961 AD) was buried with his “gilded” helmet and another pieces of gear and his skald Eyvindr praises his arrival to Valhǫll, where he refuses to hand off his equipment.

Many authors claimed there is almost no evidence because of the weight of helmets. However, the true reason of this is that helmets were very expensive and were worn only by nobles and their retinues.

In case of deeper interest, I reccomend my further work, Grafnir hjálmar : A Comment on the Viking Age Helmets, Their Developement and Usage (in Czech).

Bibliography

FECHNER, Maria V. (1965). О ≪скрамасаксе≫ из Гнёздова // Новое в советской археологии, Москва, 260–262.

GRAHAM-CAMPBELL, James (1980). Viking Artefacts: A Select Catalogue, London.

GRIEG, Sigurd (1947). Gjermundbufunnet : en høvdingegrav fra 900-årene fra Ringerike, Oslo.

HEJDOVÁ, Dagmar (1964). Přilba zvaná „svatováclavská“. Sborník Národního muzea v Praze, A 18, č. 1–2, Praha.

HOLMQUIST OLAUSSON, Lena – PETROVSKI, Slavica (2007). Curious birds – two helmet (?) mounts with a christian motif from Birka’s Garrison. In: FRANSSON, Ulf (ed). Cultural interaction between east and west, Stockholm, 231–238.

KALMRING, Sven (2014). A conical bronze boss and Hedeby´s Eastern connection. In: Fornvännen 109, 1–11, Stockholm. Available at: https://www.academia.edu/6845231/A_conical_bronze_boss_and_Hedebys_Eastern_connection

KIRPIČNIKOV, Anatolij N. (1971). Древнерусское оружие: Вып. 3. Доспех, комплекс боевых средств, IX–XIII вв.// АН СССР, Москва.

LINDQVIST, Sune (1925). Vendelhjälmarnas ursprung. In: Fornvännen 20, Stockholm, 181–207. Available at: http://samla.raa.se/xmlui/bitstream/handle/raa/796/1925_181.pdf?sequence=1

MUNKSGAARD, Elisabeth (1984). A Viking Age smith, his tools and his stock-in-trade. In: Offa 41, Neumünster, 85–89.

SIZOV, Vladimír I. (1902). Курганы Смоленской губернии I. Гнездовский могильник близ Смоленска. Материалы по археологии России 28, Санкт-Петербург.

TWEDDLE, Dominic (1992). The Anglian Helmet from 16-22 Coppergate, The Archaeology of York. The Small Finds AY 17/8, York.

VLASATÝ, Tomáš (2014). Fragmenty přilby z Birky. In: Projekt Forlǫg: Reenactment a věda [online]. [cit. 2016-01-03]. Available at: http://sagy.vikingove.cz/fragmenty-prilby-z-birky/

VLASATÝ, Tomáš (2015a). Další fragment přilby z Birky. In: Projekt Forlǫg: Reenactment a věda [online]. [cit. 2016-01-03]. Available at: http://sagy.vikingove.cz/dalsi-fragment-prilby-z-birky/

VLASATÝ, Tomáš (2015b). The helmet from Tjele. In: Projekt Forlǫg: Reenactment a věda [online]. [cit. 2016-01-03]. Available at: http://sagy.vikingove.cz/the-helmet-from-tjele/

VLASATÝ, Tomáš (2015c). The helmet from Lokrume. In: Projekt Forlǫg: Reenactment a věda [online]. [quoted 2016-11-21]. Available at: http://sagy.vikingove.cz/the-helmet-from-lokrume-gotland/

VLASATÝ, Tomáš (2016). The helmet from Gjermundbu. In: Projekt Forlǫg: Reenactment a věda [online]. [quoted 2016-11-21]. Available at: http://sagy.vikingove.cz/the-helmet-from-gjermundbu/

VLASATÝ, Tomáš (2018a). Přilba z Kyjeva. In: Projekt Forlǫg: Reenactment a věda [online]. [quoted 2018-11-24]. Available at: http://sagy.vikingove.cz/prilba-z-kyjeva/

VLASATÝ, Tomáš (2018b). K původu „svatováclavské přilby“. In: Projekt Forlǫg: Reenactment a věda [online]. [quoted 2018-11-24]. Available at: http://sagy.vikingove.cz/k-puvodu-svatovaclavske-prilby/

Přilba z Lokrume

Když jsem nedávno napsal článek o vikinských přilbách a uvědomil jsem si, že jsem zatím neviděl zrekonstruovaný fragment z Lokrume, nečekal jsem, že se repliky dočkám tak rychle. Můj běloruský přítel Dmitrij Chramcov (známý též jako Truin Stenja), zručný kovář a šperkař, o jehož variaci přilby z Tjele jsem již dříve napsal, vyrobil dle mého názoru zajímavou rekonstrukci lokrumského fragmentu. Ale nejdřív se pojďme podívat na originál.

O fragmentu z Lokrume, který je dlouhodobě vystaven v muzeu ve Visby pod inventárním číslem GF B 1683, poprvé napsal časopis Fornvännen roku 1907:

„Fragment přilby (obočí a nánosník) ze železa potaženého stříbrným plechem, do něhož jsou niellem vyložené ornamenty. Předmět, který náleží Visby Fornsal a který byl nalezen v okrese Lokrume na Gotlandu, je jediným doposud nalezeným kusem přilby z doby vikinské a představuje zajímavou paralelu k o několik století starším přilbám z Vendelu. (Fornvännen 1907: 208, Obr. 8)

1

Převzato z Fornvännen 1907: 208, Obr. 8; Lindqvist 1925: 194, Obr. 97.

Roku 1925 o fragmentu napsal Sune Lindqvist ve svém pojednání o přilbách z doby vendelské (Lindqvist 1925: 192–194, Obr. 97). Doslova o něm napsal to, že je „ze železa a se vší pravděpodobností pochází z kontinentu, protože je dekorován tenkou stříbrnou vrstvou, což je umělecká technika, která se na Severu začala uplatňovat nejdříve v době vikinské“ (Lindqvist 1925: 192–193). Všímá si také faktu, že obočí není zakončeno koncovkami ve tvaru zvířecích hlav, jako je tomu například u obočí přilby z Broa (Lindqvist 1925: 194).

Při publikování nálezu z Gjermundbu na Lindqvista zareagoval Sigurd Grieg, který napsal:

V této souvislosti je zajímavé se také zmínit o tom, že z gotlandského Lokrume se zachoval fragment přilby z doby vikinské, o kterém spolu s dalšími přilbami mluví Lindquist.
Kousek se datuje do doby vikinské a jeho dekorace rovněž naznačuje, že náleží do této epochy. Skládá se z obočí a části nánosku. Tento fragment je pro nás nesmírně zajímavý, protože ornamenty vykazují podobnost s těmi, které se nacházejí na meči z Lipphener See (…).
Lindqvist předpokládá, že tento kus je vývozem z kontinentu, protože dekorace užívající potažení tenkou stříbrnou vrstvou nebyla na Severu do doby vikinské používána. Proti tomu se vyjádřil Gutorm Gjessing, který s naprostou pravdou řekl: ‚Podle našeho názoru lokrumský fragment nemůže být chápán jako předstupeň vendelských přileb, jak jej chápe Lindqvist (…). Technika potahování tenkou stříbrnou vrstvou spolu se zdobení niellem je z doby vikinské dobře známa a je nad vše jasné, že byla velmi populární při poměrně rozsáhlé výrobě zbraní na Gotlandu v mladší době vikinské (…).’“ (Grieg 1947: 44–45)

Grieg, citujíce Gjessinga, hledá analogie dekorace lokrumského fragmentu v 10. století, konkrétně u svatováclavské přilby a meče typu S z Lipphener See (Grieg 1947: 45).

lokrume_motiv

Rekonstrukce motivu. Vytvořil Jan Zbránek.

Když roku 1984 Elisabeth Munksgaardová napsala svůj článek o fragmentu z Tjele, pouze lokrumský fragment zmínila bez bližšího komentáře (Munksgaard 1984: 87). Totéž činí také Dominik Tweddle (Tweedle 1992: 1126), který pouze zmiňuje fakt, že fragment je zdobený a že není zakončen koncovkami ve tvaru zvířecích hlav.

Důležitou práci představuje Die Wikingerzeit Gotlands Leny Thunmark-Nylénové, která jako první přináší detailní fotografii, rozměry a komentář (WZG II: 264:1; III: 317; IV: 521–522):

Okres Lokrume, GF B 1683
Ochrana obočí pocházející z přilby; železo tausované stříbrem s vyrytým a niellovaným zdobením ve formě vzdušných splétaných pásek s poutky a proplétanými kruhy; délka 13,2 cm.“ (WZG IV: 521–522)

Obočí přilby, bez jakýchkoli informací o nálezové okolnosti, představuje jediný exemplář vikinské přilby z Gotlandu. Předmět je ze železa a je opatřen plošným tausováním, do něhož je na široké ploše proveden niellovaný páskový motiv. Na okolních plochách směrem k očím se nacházejí příčné pásky.“ (WZG III: 317)

Thunmark-Nylénová hledá analogie motivu na norských mečích, na jejichž základě dochází k závěru, že datace do doby vikinské je nezpochybnitelná (WZG III: 317, pozn. 75).

2

Převzato z WZG II: 264:1.

Mattias Frisk, který napsal kvalitní vysokoškolskou práci o severských přilbách z mladší doby železné (Frisk 2012), napsal o fragmentu z Lokrume prakticky totéž co Lindqvist:

Fragment se skládá z páru obočí a krátkého, odlomeného nánosku. Je ze železa a je potažen stříbrným plechem, který je vyložen plošným ornamentem (…).“ (Frisk 2012: 23)

Zatím poslední dílo, o kterém vím, že fragmentu z Lokrume věnuje větší pozornost, je kniha Vikinger i Krig od Kima Hjardara a Vegarda Vike (Hjardar – Vike 2011: 188, 190). Kromě toho, že uveřejňují rozdílnou velikost fragmentu (12,8 cm) a poměrně detailní fotografii, krátce komentují dekoraci a její dataci:

Druhým je bezkontextově nalezený nánosek z gotlandského Lokrume s ornamentem, jehož styl lze datovat do let 950–1000. (…) Nánosek z gotlandského Lokrume je vyroben ze železa, potažen stříbrem a vyložen plošným ornamentem a příčnými pásky z mědi.“ (Hjardar – Vike 2011: 188)

vikingerikrig190

Převzato z Hjardar – Vike 2011: 190.

Lze si povšimnout, že někteří badatelé zastávají rozdílné názory, pokud se týče popisu zdobných technik. Můžeme rozlišovat dvě stanoviska:

  • potažení / plátování stříbrem + vyložený niellovaný motiv (Fornvännen 1907; Lindqvist 1925; Grieg 1947; Frisk 2011; Hjardar – Vike 2011)
  • tausování stříbrem + vyložený niellovaný motivem (WZG IV: 521–522; WZG III: 317)

Když jsem tento fragment diskutoval s kovářem a šperkařem Petrem Floriánkem, bezesporu největším českým znalcem vikinského umění, vysvětlil mi, že dekorace může být vyrobena dvěma způsoby, a sice:

  • metodou inlay: na povrchu předmětu jsou vysekány drážky, které jsou vyplňovány kontrastním materiálem v určitém motivu. Drážky korespondují s motivem.
  • metodou overlay: na povrchu předmětu jsou pod úhlem vysekány drážky na způsob mřížky, do kterých je vtepáván drát v určitém motivu. Drážky nekorespondují s motivem.
lokrume_muzeum

Fragment vystavený v muzeu Visby Fornsal.

Podle Petra byly obě metody v době vikinské populární a lze je objevit na uměleckých dílech (zejména zbraních) z  2. poloviny 10. století, do které se fragment datuje. Metodu použití niella, kterou navrhuje valná část badatelů, Petr pokládá za méně pravděpodobnou, protože drážky, ze kterých je vypadaný motiv, jsou uniformní šířky, což by spíše nasvědčovalo použití drátu. Materiálem drátu mohla být měď, protože ta na povrchu drží hůře než stříbro a je náchylnější na vypadnutí. Příčných širokých pásků pak podle Petra dosti pravděpodobně nebylo dosaženo pomocí niella.

Je důležité zmínit fakt, že není známo, z jakého typu přilby fragment pocházel. Badatelé však k tíhnou z brýlové přilbě, což se na základě analogií (tvaru obočí na fragmentech přileb z Broa, Gjermundbu, Tjele a Kyjeva) zdá být uveřitelnější variantou. I rozměry masky jsou podobné rozměrům masek z brýlových přileb (šířka 12,8–13,2 cm a tloušťka, podle odhadu Petra Floriánka, kolem 3 mm). Samostatný nánosek bez očnic je znám pouze ze svatováclavské přilby, a přestože vše naznačuje, že obě masky byly vyrobeny na Gotlandu ve stejném období, tvarově se od sebe odlišují. To však neznamená, že bychom měli nánosek tvaru T ihned zavrhnout.

Replika, kterou vyrobil Dmitrij Chramcov a kterou Petr Floriánek i já považujeme za velmi kvalitní, používá metodu overlay – na některých níže přiložených fotkách si můžeme povšimnout vysekané mřížky, do které je vtepáván stříbrný a měděný drát. Maska je zevnitř dutá, stejně jako obočí přilby z Broa – přestože nám není známo, zda je dutý i původní nález. Maska je na zvon přichycena čtyřmi nýty, z nichž dva jsou zapuštěné v centrální části obočí a jsou zapájeny stříbrem, a tak nejsou na lícové straně vidět. Zbytek masky je dotvořen na základě masky z Kyjeva. Zvon přilby byl vyroben podle charakteristické konstrukce přilby z Gjermundbu.

 

Závěrem bych chtěl poděkovat Dmitrijovi Chramcovovi za možnost zveřejnit jeho fotografie a také Petru Floriánkovi, který si na mě udělal čas a podělil se se mnou o své zkušenosti a názory. Díky patří také Janu Zbránkovi, který ochotně vytvořil ilustraci s překresleným motivem.


Bibliografie:
Fornvännen 1907 = Ur främmande samlingar 2. In: Fornvännen 2, Stockholm 1907, 205–208. Dostupné z: http://samla.raa.se/xmlui/bitstream/handle/raa/5533/1907_205.pdf?sequence=1.

FRISK, Mattias (2012). Hjälmen under yngre järnåldern : härkomst, förekomst och bruk, Visby: Högskolan på Gotland [vysokoškolská práce]. Dostupné z: http://www.diva-portal.org/smash/get/diva2:541128/FULLTEXT01.pdf.

GRIEG, Sigurd (1947). Gjermundbufunnet : en høvdingegrav fra 900-årene fra Ringerike, Oslo.

HJARDAR, Kim – VIKE, Vegard (2011). Vikinger i krig, Oslo.

LINDQVIST, Sune (1925). Vendelhjälmarnas ursprung. In: Fornvännen 20, Stockholm, 181–207. Dostupné z: http://samla.raa.se/xmlui/bitstream/handle/raa/796/1925_181.pdf?sequence=1.

MUNKSGAARD, Elisabeth (1984). A Viking Age smith, his tools and his stock-in-trade. In: Offa 41, Neumünster, 85–89.

TWEDDLE, Dominic (1992). The Anglian Helmet from 16-22 Coppergate, The Archaeology of York. The Small Finds AY 17/8, York.

WZG II = Thunmark-Nylén, Lena (1998). Die Wikingerzeit Gotlands II : Typentafeln, Stockholm.

WZG III = Thunmark-Nylén, Lena (2006). Die Wikingerzeit Gotlands III: 1–2 : Text, Stockholm.

WZG IV = Thunmark-Nylén, Lena (2000). Die Wikingerzeit Gotlands IV:1–3 : Katalog, Stockholm.

Přilba z Tjele

Fragment přilby z Tjele. Fotograf: Arnold Mikkelsen, Nationalmuseet. Převzato ze stránek katalogu dánského národního muzea.

Roku 1850 nalezl mladý farmář v lese Lindum Storskov u dánského Tjele neobvyklý nález – velký soubor kovářských nástrojů. Díky místním orgánům se sada dostala do kodaňského muzea, kde byla analyzována. Nález byl publikován celkem třikrát, nejprve roku 1858 (Boye 1858), posléze roku 1939 (Ohlhaver 1939) a konečně roku 1984 (Munksgaard 1984). Teprve v posledním zmiňovaném zpracování byl zveřejněn ve své úplnosti.

Zvláště zajímavým artefaktem je fragment přilby, který byl původně považován za kování sedla. Elisabeth Munksgaardová však rozpoznala hodnotu fragmentu. I přesto se jedná o často přehlížený nález, který, pokud je mi známo, nikdy nebyl podroben detailní analýze a odborné rekonstrukci. To je také důvod, proč vznikl tento článek.

Munksgaardová podává několik důležitých informací:

Křídlovitý předmět není kováním sedla, ale obočím a nánoskem přilby, které jsou vyrobeny z železa a bronzu. (…) Bohužel nejsme schopni posoudit, jak přilba z Tjele vypadala. V nálezu nebyly objeveny stopy po kroužkovém pletivu nebo železných plátech, ze kterých by mohl být vyroben zbytek přilby. Nalezlo se však osm fragmentů tenkých železných pásků o šířce kolem 1 cm a o různé délce, které mohly sloužit ke spojení plátů.” (Munksgaard 1984: 87)

Munksgaardová se spíše než popisu fragmentu věnuje jeho srovnání s přilbou z Gjermundbu, kterou pokládá za nejbližší analogii. Z toho vyplývá, že fragment považuje za masku brýlové přilby s nízkým zvonem, který byl podle jejího názoru používán zhruba do roku 1000 (Munksgaard 1984: 88). Dataci upravuje Lundová (2006: 325, 339), která nález z Tjele zařazuje do období let cca 950–970. Myšlenku, že fragment pochází z brýlové přilby, explicitně zastává také Tweedle (1992: 1126), podle něhož lze předpokládat, že k jednokusové masce byly původně nanýtovány samostatné očnice. Tomu by nasvědčovala díra v rozšířené části nánosku.

Velikost masky není nikde explicitně uvedena, ale podle Munksgaardové a Tweedleho je pravděpodobná šířka 12 cm a výška 7 cm (Munksgaard 1984: 87, fig. 4; Tweedle 1992: 1128, fig. 561). Uprostřed obočí, přímo na úpatí nánosku, se nachází díra pro nýt. Na obočí se nachází minimálně jeden patrný bronzový pásek – tyto bronzové pásky musely být symetricky rozmístěné na obočí. Obočí tak muselo být hlavním distinktivním rysem; můžeme si povšimnout, že všechny dochované fragmenty masek vikinských přileb jsou zdobené rozličnými metodami.

Co se týče konstrukce, můžeme spekulovat o tom, že zvon mohl být vyroben ze čtyř plátů nanýtovaných na čtyři vyztužující žebra. Podobná žebra se musely nacházet i uvnitř helmy. Osm úzkých pásků, o nichž hovoří Munksgaardová, mohou představovat právě tyto výztuhy. Na spodním okraji kostry se mohl nacházet vodorovný zesilující široký pás, na nějž byla nanýtována zdobená maska.

Ač jde o pouhý fragment, význam tohoto nálezu nelze podceňovat. Rozšiřuje hranice našeho poznání, a tak můžeme udělat lepší obrázek o ochranném odění doby vikinské, jeho zdobení, tvůrcích i příjemcích. A to jak na úrovni vědeckého bádání, tak na úrovni historické rekonstrukce.

V nedávné době se dva mí přátelé pokusili o rekonstrukci přilby z Tjele. Je otázkou, nakolik je rekonstrukce možná, když zvon přilby není dochován a maska není kompletní. Na druhou stranu se domnívám, že jde o zdařilé pokusy, které vypadají uvěřitelně a které zároveň můžou rozšířit spektrum helem na našich bojištích.

Nejprve se podívejme na dílo Dmitrije Chramcova. Základem jeho pokusu byl typ zvonu, který se používá u přileb z vendelského období. Vzhledem k samostatně nanýtovaným očnicím se tato verze jeví jako možná, protože samostatné očnice jsou typické právě pro starší přilby. Použitá žebra jsou však širší než ta, o nichž píše Munksgaardová. Používá 7 bronzových pásků na obočí, celkově 14.

 

Druhý pokus tvoří přilba Konstantina Širjajeva, který umístil masku na rekonstrukci zvonu přilby z Gjermundbu. Opět jde o uvěřitelné řešení, které je podtrženo elegantním provedením. Používá 8 bronzových pásků na obočí, celkově tedy 16.


Použitá literatura:

BOYE, V. (1858). To fund af smedeværktøi fra den sidste hedenske tid i Danmark (Thiele-Fundet og Snoldelev-Fundet). In: Annaler for Nordisk Oldkyndighed og Historie, København: 191–200.

LUND, J. (2006). Vikingetidens værktøjskister i landskab og mytologi
(Viking Period tool chests in the landscape and in mythology). Fornvännen
101, Stockholm: 323–341.

MUNKSGAARD, E. (1984). A Viking Age smith, his tools and his stock-in-trade. In: Offa 41, Neumünster: 85–89.

OHLHAVER, H. (1939). Der germanische Schmied und sein Werkzeug. Hamburger Schriften zur Vorgeschichte und Germanischen Frühgeschichte, Band 2, Leipzig.

TWEDDLE, D. (1992). The Anglian Helmet from 16-22 Coppergate, The Archaeology of York. The Small Finds AY 17/8, York.