Origins of the “St. Wenceslas Helmet”


In December 2016, an extraordinary sword of Petersen’s type S, known for its rich decoration, was found in Lázně Toušeň in Central Bohemia. Although swords of the type were found in locations ranging from Ireland to Russia, this specific piece is the very first example from the Czech Republic. Thanks to my cooperation with Jiří Košta and Jiří Hošek on mapping the analogies, I had the opportunity to examine the weapon by myself. This and other events of the past two years affected me greatly and made me rethink my approach to many topics. Foremost I felt the need to once again review the so-called St. Wenceslas helmet, the nose-guard and browband in particular.

The helmet known as “St. Wenceslas helmet” is very well known and curious item, which has been kept in Bohemia from the Early Middle Ages, with many publications covering the topic (most notably by Hejdová 1964Merhautová 1992Schránil 1934). Along with a chainmail, a mail cloak and other items, it is a part of the crown jewels, playing its symbolic role in the past millennium. The recent research confirmed that the oldest of these artefacts originated in the 10th century (Bernart – Bravermanová – Ledvina 2014). Nowadays, the helmet consists of a dome, a nose-guard and browband, showing many, often low-quality repairs, which suggest the helmet undergone a complicated development. It is obvious that in its current form, the helmet is a compilation was meant for occasional exhibits and was never meant to be used on the actual head. Let’s thoroughly summarise what facts we have about the helmet, and what is just an assumption.

svatovaclavkaCondition of the St. Wenceslas helmet in 1934. Click for higher resolution.
Source: Schránil 1934: Tab. XIII and XIV.

On the helmet’s base, the measurements of the inner oval are 24,4 cm × 20,9 cm, with a circumference of 70 cm. The single-piece conical dome might have been crafted in Czech lands, and due to being dated in 10th century, it could have been around during St. Wenceslas’s reign (†935) (Bernart – Bravermanová – Ledvina 2014: 179). It is thus possibly one of the oldest preserved single-piece conical helmets, of which the closest parallels can be found in the Czech Republic and Poland (Bernart 2010). The helmet dome has height of 16 cm, with the helmet weighing a total of 1 kilogram. A presumption that the helmet dome was of younger date was not confirmed. The material of the helmet is substantially inhomogenous – on the forehead, the thickness is between 1,6 and 1,9 mm, while being 0,6 to 1,9 mm on the sides (personal discussion with Miloš Bernart). In the place where the nose-guard is attached today, there was originally an integral nose-guard that was later cut off and the area surrounding it was adjusted by hammering to fit the now-present part. Hejdová suggested that the original helmet had ear and neck protection prior to the adjustment, leaving holes around the edge (Hejdová 196619671968), but a recent analysis considers these to be a remnant after helmet padding (Bernart – Bravermanová – Ledvina 2014). These two aspects should not be viewed as separated – as is suggested in case of Lednica helmet, the helmet padding could be the base of the ear and neck protection that was attached to it (Sankiewicz – Wyrwa 2018: 217-219). The dome bears signs of several repairs, which had though avoided a rather specific hole on the helmet rear most likely either caused by a weapon blow or was meant to suggest so. Further details on measurements and repairs are summarised by Hejdová and Schránil (Hejdová 1964; Schránil 1934).

jednokusSelection of single-piece helmets from the Czech Republic and Poland.
Source: Bernart 2010.

Some time following the death of St. Wenceslas, but possibly still in 10th century, the helmet received various modifications linked to its exaltation to a sacred relic. The adjustments were possibly initiated either by Duke Boleslav II. (†999), who supported the cult of St. Wenceslas, or his wife, the duchess Emma (Bernart – Bravermanová – Ledvina 2014: 181). The existence of the modified helmet was possibly reflected by author of the so-called “Legend of Kristián”, dated 992-994 AD. The legend speaks of Duke Wenceslas meeting Duke Radslav of Kouřim, who laid down his weapon after seeing a mark of the Holy Cross shining on Wenceslas’s forehead. It is possible that Kristián, being a potential brother of Boleslav II. and therefore well aware of the Přemyslid dynasty affairs at the end of 10th century, meant the shining cross as a reference to the decorated nose-guard, a newly installed decoration on the helmet. According to Merhautová, the helmet could had been unveiled at the occasion of founding the Archdiocese of Prague in 973 AD (Merhautová 2000: 91).

One of lesser modifications done during the 10th century affected the lower edge of helmet dome, where an aventail holder made of folded silver strip was riveted. Today, only fragments of the strip holder on inner and outer edge remain. This type of holder represents a very laborious and highly effective protection; there are grooves cut or sheared into the fold of the strip, to which rings holding the aventail are inserted, held in place by a metal wire. This sophisticated method is known from at least ten other Early Middle Ages helmets and helmet fragments, where the strip is made from iron, brass or gilded bronze (Vlasatý 2015). The St. Wenceslas treasure guarded in Prague also contains a chainmail. It is accompanied by a square-shaped mail cloak, which upper part (a sort of “standing collar” with dimensions 50 × 7,5 cm) is fringed with three lines of almost pure gold rings (Schránil 1934). The uppermost line of rings is again made of iron. A detailed analysis confirmed that the collar is made of identical rings as the chainmail but differs from the rest of the mail cloak. The researchers (Bernart – Bravermanová – Ledvina 2014: 180181) suggest the collar was originally a standing collar of the chainmail, only later to be removed and re-used as an aventail attached to the helmet with iron rings. The aventail was possibly removed from the helmet during reign of Charles IV and became a basis for the mail cloak, later to be expanded to the current shape. Because of the original length of 7,5 cm and use of a silver holder, it seems this part of the helmet was purely decorative.

vaclav-limecDetail of the collar with golden fringe. Source: Bernart 2010: pic. 37.

Another modification, possibly done simultaneously with the previously mentioned improvements, was an installation of the nose-guard and the browband. We shall take a deeper look at this particular change as the nose-guard has been greatly discussed by many Czech researchers, and as I will attempt to show, many of the opinions were completely misleading and based on ignorance of wider context. The nose-guard is cross-shaped with a total height of 14,7 cm, width of 18,5 cm and is thick up to 5 mm. On three of its ends, it is attached to the dome by large iron rivets. The brow part is lobated on the upper edge and represents eye-brows. The nasal itself copies the shape of a nose and is 6,3 cm long and 3,3 cm wide. From the side view, the nasal seems to be slightly bent, which Miloš Bernart claims to be caused by falling on its lower end. There is a small thorn of unknown function coming out of the middle of the lower end of the nose-guard. Due to typological similarity with a helmets from Olomouc and Lednica, we could argue the thorn was expanded to a small hook used for attaching face-protecting aventail (Sankiewicz – Wyrwa 2018: 217-219). Nearest analogy of the cross-shaped nose-guard is known from Bosnian Trnčina, which is dated to 10th-11th century (D’Amato 2015: 67, Pl. 5) and is a second specimen of single-piece helmet with additional nose-guard. Lower part of St. Wenceslas helmet’s dome is edged with a decorative brow band covering the silver aventail holder, ending beneath the nose-guard. It was attached to the helmet by rivets, together with two larger rivets on the nose-guard; the rivets fastening the band were secured by copper pads on the inner side of the helmet. Circa three-quarters of this brow band survived to present day, which got probably damaged in the past to a point where it had to be repaired by additional attachments. Decorative band on a helmet is an uncommon feature, known mostly from Eastern Europe (Holmquist Olausson – Petrovski 2007: 234-236). The nearest analogy of the band is possibly a decoration of helmet from Nemia, Ukraine, dated to 11th century (Kirpičnikov 1971: Tabl. IX).

Schematic reconstruction of the helmet circa 1000 AD.
Source: Taken from Czech Radio website.

The silver surface of both the nose-guard and browband is decorated by overlay. This method is based on cutting into the base material in various directions, to which a more expensive metal is then hammered (Fuglesang 1980: 125–126; Moilanen 2015: 276–277). In the case of the nose-guard, the base metal is cut in three directions; this fact is apparent on X-ray photos, on some spots even with naked eye. The browband is most likely decorated the same way. Silver wire or plate was used for overlay, and analysis also shows traces of copper, gold, lead and corroded zinc, though not used for decoration (personal discussion with Miloš Bernart). According to Vegard Vike, the material used for decoration was silver wire mechanically hammered to the cuts, while a copper-alloy wire might had been used for outlines which are now missing. Miloš Bernart, Petr Floriánek and Jeff Pringle agree that the outlines were originally filled with niello, which fell out over time. The nearest analogical helmets with masks decorated by overlay are from Lokrume, Gotland, and Kiev, Ukraine (Vlasatý 2016Vlasatý 2018). Furthermore, a fragment from Lokrume is decorated by identical motifs as the St. Wenceslas helmet’s browband. Overlay decoration is also commonly used on weapons and riding equipment from 950 AD to beginning of 12th century in England and Scandinavia, from where this method could had expanded to neighbour countries together with motifs achieved by this method. Like in the case of the sword find from Lázně Toušeň, it is extremely difficult to determine the point of origin, because spread of fashion also included manufacturing processes, not only the final product. Overlay method thus only indicates that the item most likely originated in Northern or Eastern Europe.

Wenceslas_noseguard-ChristDetail of the St. Wenceslas helmet’s nose-guard. Source: Vegard Vike.

I believe that motifs achieved by this method on the nose-guard can help us narrow down the place of manufacturing. To displeasure of all Czech researchers who would love to deem the character depicted on the nose-guard as Norse god Oðinn (eg. Merhautová 1992Merhautová 2000Sommer 2001: 32), it is necessary to reject this theory once and for all. In fact, it is an early depiction of crucified Jesus Christ (as was suggested by Benda, Hejdová and Schránil), that has many parallels in European area up to 12th century (Fuglesang 1981Staecker 1999). Its function on the nose-guard is clear – to represent a Christian owner, depicts a formula of Christ’s redemption and his second coming, to induce fear and awe in the enemy. If Merhautová (2000: 91) writes that „cruficied Christ neither was, nor as a winner over death could not be depicted hairless, with shouting mouth and untreated moustache (…)“, it is only a proof of ignoring archaeological material, which we need to present on the example of finds of crosses, wood carvings and militaria.

jellingEarly Scandinavian depictions of Christ. Click for higher resolution.
A stone from Jelling, cast figure from Haithabu, wooden figure from Jelling mound, pendant from Birka grave Bj 660.

krizkyDepiction of Christ from Northern and Western Europe. 9th-12th century. Click for higher resolution.
Source: Staecker 1999: Abb. 59, 61, 68, 79; Kat. Nr. 14, 43, 46, 49, 51a, 53a, 54, 60, 65, 74, 81, 86, 100, 116a.

jezis_meceFigures on sword pommels interpreted as Jesus, 11th century.
Swords from Pada, Estonia and Ålu, Norway. Source: Ebert 1914: 121 and Unimus.no catalogue.

Let us take a closer look at separate parts of the nose-guard’s decoration. Most attention was paid to head of the figure which – although not being entirely preserved – has two staring eyes, open mouth with bared teeth, untreated moustache forked in many directions and a crown of unspecifiable shape. Such features were in the past perceived as a reason why this character can not be considered crucified Jesus Christ. All of them can be though found on early Christian art of Western, Central, Northern and Eastern Europe in 9th-12th century. The closest similarity can be seen on the face of Crucified on a cross found in Stora Uppakrå, Sweden (11th century; Staecker 1999: Kat. Nr. 51). Also from 11th century, a sword found in Ålu, Norway (C36640) has pommel depicting Christ with bared teeth, moustache, stare and tri-tipped crown on head (discussion with Vegard Vike). If we attempted to specify shape of the crown, we can then point out to analogies, in which crosses, rhombuses with cross motif, Hand of God, halos or hats are depicted above head of the Crucified, with the rhombus and Hand of God seem to be the closest. Depicted features belong to angry God, which one should be afraid of – this is common for era up to 1000 AD, when Christian Europe was under constant attacks. In newly Christianised lands, Jesus Christ was just one god of the local pantheon at first (Bednaříková 2009: 94), and had to achieve his preference by force, not by gestures of friendship and humility.

hlavaHeads of the Crucified in European art, 9th-12th century.
Click for higher resolution. Source: Staecker 1999.

Also, arms wound with two pair of bracelets similar with rings were in the past considered a reason why a figure cannot be considered crucified Jesus Christ. But the period iconography is in direct contradiction – on the contrary, it seems that early depictions of Jesus Christ often show Jesus bound, not only nailed to cross (Fuglesang 1981). The rings therefore represent loops binding arms, or pleated sleeve of tunic that the figure is wearing. Position of thumbs pointing upwards is then a feature undoubtedly pointing to Jesus on cross. An X-ray screening and detailed photos also seem to show a stigma or nails. Arms appear to be broken, to which we also find analogies on a crucifix from Hungarian Peceszentmárton (12th century; Jakab 2006).

rukaHands of the Cruficied in European and Turkish art, 9th-12th century.
Click for higher resolution. Source: Staecker 1999 and the Jelling stone.

Body of the figure seems to be dressed in a tunic or coat, which is tied in the waistline area with a massive belt or rope. The coat is also decorated with opposite lines creating a herringbone motif. It is also possible to find many parallels to these details in period iconography, with a bound belt being widely used in Scandinavian art. As for the legs, their decoration is mostly fallen out, which makes any reconstruction near to impossible; it is though obvious that the figure stands with legs apart. That might seem as an uncommon feature, but still we know some analogies.

hrud-pasBody of the Crucified in European art, 9th-12th century.
Click for higher resolution. Source: Staecker 1999 and Jelling finds.

Legs of the Crucified in European art, 9th-12th century.
Click for higher resolution. Source: Staecker 1999.

Above the crown of the crucified character, there is a non-completely preserved plaited ornament, filling the area where the nose-guard narrows. This motif closely resembles a filling plait found on hilts of Petersen type L, R, S and T swords (Petersen 1919) and on spear sockets (eg. Fuglesang 1980). The plaits on the swords originating in 2nd half of 10th century are the nearest analogy, while the spear decorations evolving into more complicated forms categorised as Ringerike style can be dated between the end of 10th century and third quarter of 11th century (Fuglesang 1980: 18; Wilson – Klindt-Jensen 1966: 146).

strelka Plaited ornament on Scandinavian and Estonian weapons, 10th-11th century.
Source: Jets 2012: Fig. 1 and Unimus.no catalogue.

Above the arms and next to them are simple tri-tipped ornaments and intertwined loops. Their position on the nose-guard is symmetrical. It seems that this decoration was meant to fill in empty space that would otherwise remain there. As an analogy to tri-tipped decoration, one can mention triquetras on Jelling stone, located above arms and next to face of the Crucified. But there are more parallels: tri-tipped ornaments can also be found above arms of figure depicted on pommel of Pada sword and on Ålu sword pommel where there are two crosses next to a face of the character. Loops depicted between hands and large rivets have an analogy in a loop on sword guard from Telšiai, Latvia (Tomsons 2008: 94, 5. att), in wavy lines located beneath arms of the Cruficied on cross from Gullunge, Sweden (turn of 12th century) and Finnish Halikko (12th century). In the case of Halikko cross, the wavy lines possibly represent clouds or wind currents, as the area above the head is also filled with heavenly bodies (Moon and Sun). The whole composition might therefore depict Jesus as the lord of heavens. Some crosses in Byzantium tradition depict winged angels next to hands of the Crucified. In other cases, the area below arms is filled with text or heads of figures, and so one cannot rule out that the ornament might have a similar apotropaic meaning.

vlnovka A simple ornament: St. Wenceslas helmet, Gullunge, Halikko.
Source: Staecker 1999: Kat. Nr. 112, Abb. 96.

We can evaluate the decoration on helmet’s browband as a typical plaited ornament of Borre style, which has rich analogies in lands under Scandinavian influence – circa from Great Britain to Russia. In Scandinavia, the Borre style is dated between 1st half of 9th century and 2nd half of 10th century. In Poland, the Borre style found a wide use and became favoured and was still used during 11th century (Jaworski et al. 2013: 302). Ornaments of this kind can also be found on Lokrume helmet fragment, on several Petersen type R and type S swords, and we could possibly find it on other militaria as well. Although of different shape, intertwined loops are also present on decorative band on helmet from Nemia, Ukraine.

Emblems_1-5 Plaited ornaments used on Petersen type R and type S swords from Northern, Central and Eastern Europe.
Created by Tomáš Cajthaml.

obrouckaDecorative bands on St. Wenceslas helmet and on helmet from Nemia, Ukraine.
Source: Schránil 1934: Tab. XIII; Kirpičnikov 1971: Tab. IX.

If we were to suggest a place of manufacture of these decorated components, Scandinavia, or rather the island of Gotland definitely is the most probable (Schránil 1934Benda 1972Merhautová 2000Bravermannová 2012Bernart – Bravermanová – Ledvina 2014), although there are more possibilities. Potential candidates can also be Poland, Baltic lands, Finland, Russia or Ukraine, but definitely not Rhineland, as some suggested (Hejdová 1964196619671968). The components could have gotten to Central Europe via the Polish route, which was widely open up to 70s of 10th century thanks to a marriage of Mieszko I of Poland and Czech princess Doubrava, sister of Boleslav II. But we cannot either rule out even a later import, because as proven by Ethelred’s denarii, which were copied in Bohemia and transported back to Baltic sea, the route was also open in 80s and 90s of 10th century as well (Lutovský – Petráň 2004: 95; Petráň 2006: 168).

The St. Wenceslas helmet is a compilation of several, originally unrelated components, which was most likely put together of the initiative of Boleslav II. in order to support the growing cult of St. Wenceslas and therefore his own position. The helmet was modified and repeatedly repaired throughout the ages. Historical and cultural value of this item is incalculable. Currently, the helmet is on exhibition at Prague castle, where it receives a major attention both local and foreign visitors.

St. Wenceslas helmet with shining nose-guard.
Source: Jan Gloc, Prague castle administration.


Bibliography

Bednaříková, Jarmila (2009). Ansgar a problémy misií na evropském severu. In: Křesťanstvo v časoch sv. Vojtěcha, Kraków, 85–103.

Benda, Klement (1972). Svatováclavská přilba ve výtvarném vývoji přemyslovských Čech. In: Umění 20, no. 2, 114–148.

Bernart, Miloš (2010). Raně středověké přílby, zbroje a štíty z Českých zemí, Praha: Univerzita Karlova.

Bernart, Miloš  Bravermanová, Milena  Ledvina, Petr (2014). Arma sancti Venceslai: nová zjištění o přilbě, zbroji a meči zv. Svatováclavské. In: Časopis Společnosti přátel starožitností, Roč. 122, no. 3, 179182.

Bravermanová, Milena (2012). The so-called armour of St. Wenceslaus – a historical introduction. In: Acta Militaria Mediaevalia, VIII, Kraków – Rzeszów – Sanok 2011, 213–220.

D’Amato, Raffaele (2015). Old and new evidence on the East-Roman helmets from the 9th to the 12th centuries. In: Acta Militaria Mediaevalia, tom XI, red. Piotr N. Kotowicz, Kraków – Wrocław – Sanok, 27–157.

Ebert, Max (1914). Zu den Beziehungen der Ostseeprovinzen mit Skandinavien in der ersten Hälfte des 11. Jahrhunderts. In: Baltische Studien zur Archäologie und Geschichte : Arbeiten der Baltischen vorbereitenden Komitees für den XVI. Archäologischen Kongress in Pleskau 1914, Berlin, 117–139.

Fuglesang, Signe Horn (1980). Some Aspects of the Ringerike Style : A phase of 11th century Scandinavian art, Odense.

Fuglesang, Signe Horn (1981). Crucifixion iconography in Viking Scandinavia. In: Hans Bekker-Nielsen – Peter Foote – Olaf Olsen (eds.). Proceedings of the Eighth Viking Congress. Århus 24-31 August 1977, Odense, 73–94.

Hejdová, Dagmar (1964). Přilba zvaná „svatováclavská“.In: Sborník Národního muzea v Praze, A 18, no. 1–2, 1–106.

Hejdová Dagmar (1966). Der sogenannte St.-Wenzels-Helm (1. Teil). In: Waffen und Kostümkunde 8/2, 95–110.

Hejdová Dagmar (1967). Der sogenannte St.-Wenzels-Helm (Fortsetzung). In: Waffen und Kostümkunde 9/1, 28–54.

Hejdová Dagmar (1968). Der sogenannte St.-Wenzels-Helm (Fortsetzung und Schluß). In: Waffen und Kostümkunde 10/1, 15–30.

Holmquist Olausson, Lena – Petrovski, Slavica (2007). Curious birds – two helmet (?) mounts with a christian motif from Birka’s Garrison. In: FRANSSON, Ulf (ed). Cultural interaction between east and west, Stockholm, 231-238.

Jakab, Attila (2006). Bronzkorpuszok a nyíregyházi Jósa András Múzeum gyűjteményében (Bronze crucifixes in the collection of the Jósa András Musem). In: JAMÉ 48, 261–280.

Jaworski, Krzysztof et al. (2013). Artefacts of Scandinavian origin from the Cathedral Island (Ostrow Tumski) in Wroclaw. In: Scandinavian culture in medieval Poland, Wroclaw, 279–314.

Jets, Indrek (2012). Scandinavian late Viking Age art styles as a part of the visual display of warriors in 11th century Estonia. In: Estonian Journal of Archaeology, 2012, 16/2, 118–139.

Kirpičnikov 1971 = Кирпичников А. Н.(1971). Древнерусское оружие: Вып. 3. Доспех, комплекс боевых средств IX—XIII вв., АН СССР, Москва.

Lutovský, Michal – Petráň, Zdeněk (2004). Slavníkovci, Praha.

Moilanen, Mikko (2015). Marks of Fire, Value and Faith : Swords with Ferrous Inlays in Finland During the Late Iron Age (ca. 700–1200 AD), Turku.

Merhautová, Anežka. (1992) Der St. Wenzelshelm. In: Umění 40, no. 3, 169–179.

Merhautová, Anežka (2000). Vznik a význam svatováclavské přilby. In: Přemyslovský stát kolem roku 1000 : na paměť knížete Boleslava II. (+ 7. února 999), Praha, 85–92.

Petersen, Jan (1919). De Norske Vikingesverd: En Typologisk-Kronologisk Studie Over Vikingetidens Vaaben, Kristiania.

Petráň, Zdeněk (2006). České mincovnictví 10. století. In: České země v raném středověku, Praha, 161–174.

Sankiewicz, Paweł – Wyrwa, Andrzej M. (2018). Broń drzewcowa i uzbrojenie ochronne z Ostrowa Lednickiego, Giecza i Grzybowa, Lednica.

Schránil, Josef (1934). O zbroji sv. Václava. In: Svatováclavský sborník na památku 1000. výročí smrti knížete Václava svatého. I – Kníže Václav svatý a jeho doba, Praha, 159172.

Sommer, Petr (2001). Začátky křesťanství v Čechách: kapitoly z dějin raně středověké duchovní kultury, Praha.

Staecker, Jörn (1999). Rex regum et dominus dominorum. Die wikingerzeitlichen Kreuz- und Kruzifixanhänger als Ausdruck der Mission in Altdänemark und Schweden, Stockholm.

Tomsons, Artūrs (2008). Kuršu (T1 tipa) zobeny rokturu ornaments 11. – 13. gs. In: Latvijas Nacionālā Vēstures muzeja raksti, No. 14, 85104.

Vlasatý, Tomáš (2015). Další fragment přilby z Birky. In: Projekt Forlǫg: Reenactment a věda [online]. [quoted 2019-06-05]. Available from: http://sagy.vikingove.cz/dalsi-fragment-prilby-zbirky/

Vlasatý, Tomáš (2016). The helmet from Lokrume, Gotland. In: Projekt Forlǫg: Reenactment a věda [online]. [quoted 2019-06-05]. Available from: http://sagy.vikingove.cz/the-helmet-from-lokrume-gotland/

Vlasatý, Tomáš (2018). Přilba z Kyjeva. In: Projekt Forlǫg: Reenactment a věda [online]. [quoted 2019-06-05]. Available from: http://sagy.vikingove.cz/prilba-z-kyjeva/

Wilson, David M. – Klindt-Jensen, Ole (1966). Viking Art, London.

K původu „svatováclavské přilby“

V prosinci 2016 byl ve středočeských Lázních Toušeň nalezen výjimečný meč Petersenova typu S, vyznačující se bohatou dekorací. Ačkoli se tento typ objevuje na lokalitách od Irska po Rusko, jedná se o první exemplář v České Republice. V rámci spolupráce s Jiřím Koštou a Jiřím Hoškem, kterým jsem pomáhal zmapovat analogie tohoto meče, jsem měl možnost zbraň osobně prozkoumat. Tyto i jiné události posledních dvou let ve mne zanechaly hluboké otisky, které mne donutily přehodnotit řadu stanovisek. Předně se musím opětovně vyjádřit k tzv. svatováclavské přilbě, zejména k původu jejího nánosku a obroučky.

Přilba zvaná svatováclavská je velmi známým a pozoruhodným předmětem, který je v Čechách uchováván již od raného středověku a který byl mnohokrát publikován (nejvýznamněji Hejdová 1964; Merhautová 1992Schránil 1934). Společně s kroužkovou zbrojí, pláštíkem a dalšími exponáty tvoří korunovační poklad, který v posledních tisíci letech sehrál symbolickou úlohu. Nedávné výzkumy prokázaly, že nejstarší části těchto artefaktů pocházejí z 10. století (Bernart – Bravermanová – Ledvina 2014). Přilba se dnes skládá ze zvonu, nánosku a obroučky a vykazuje četné, mnohdy nevkusné opravy, které svědčí o tom, že prošla složitým vývojem. Je evidentní, že ve své současné podobně zamýšlena jako příležitostně vystavovaný exponát. Zrevidujme si nyní důkladně, co o přilbě skutečně víme nebo předpokládáme.

svatovaclavkaStav svatováclavské přilby roku 1934. Větší rozlišení zde.
Zdroj: Schránil 1934: Tab. XIII a XIV.

Jednokusový kónický zvon přilby, jehož ovál má při základně vnitřní rozměry 24,4 cm × 20,9 cm a obvod 70 cm, mohl být vyroben v českých zemích a vzhledem ke své dataci do 10. století mohl zažít dobu Václavova panování (Bernart – Bravermanová – Ledvina 2014: 179). Jedná se tak zřejmě o jednu z nejstarších dochovaných kónických jednokusových přileb, jejíž nejbližší paralely lze hledat v České Republice a Polsku (Bernart 2010). Výška zvonu činí 16 cm, přičemž váha kompletní přilby je zhruba 1 kg. Předpoklad, že zvon přilby je mladšího data, se nepotvrdil. Materiál přilby je značně nehomogenní : na čele je použita tloušťka 1,6–1,9 mm, zatímco na bocích 0,6–1,9 mm (osobní diskuze s Milošem Bernartem). V místě, kde je dnes připevněn zdobený nánosek, se původně nacházel integrální nánosek, který byl odřezán a prostor kolem něj byl pod údery kladiva přizpůsoben novému nánosku. Podle Hejdové měla původní přilba před úpravou ochranu uší a krku, po které zbyly otvory v obvodu (Hejdová 1966; 1967; 1968), ale nová analýza si tyto vykládá jako pozůstatky po vycpávce (Bernart – Bravermanová – Ledvina 2014). Zvon vykazuje řadu oprav, které se ovšem vyhnuly specifické díře na týlu přilby, která může souviset s úderem zbraně, anebo mohla toto zdání nabuzovat. Více detailů k rozměrům a vysprávkám poskytuje Hejdová a Schránil (Hejdová 1964; Schránil 1934).

jednokusVýběr jednokusových přileb z České Republiky a Polska.
Zdroj: Bernart 2010.

Někdy po smrti sv. Václava, avšak zřejmě ještě v 10. století, se přilba dočkala modifikací, které souvisely s jejím povýšením na relikvii. Úpravu zřejmě inicioval kníže Boleslav II. († 999), který podporoval kult sv. Václava, či možná jeho žena kněžna Emma (Bernart – Bravermanová – Ledvina 2014: 181). Existenci modifikované přilby pravděpodobně reflektoval autor tzv. Kristiánovy legendy, datované do let 992–994, příběhem o setkání knížete Václava s kouřimským knížetem Radslavem, který odhodil zbraň poté, co spatřil na Václavově čele zářící podobu svatého kříže. Právě tímto křížem může tzv. Kristián, jako potenciální bratr Boleslava II. dobře obeznámený s dynastickými poměry Přemyslovců konce 10. století, odkazovat na zdobený nánosek přilby, který byl na přilbu nově instalován. Podle Merhautové mohla být přilba odhalena při zakládání pražského biskupství roku 973 (Merhautová 2000: 91).

Jedna z menších úprav, ke kterým došlo v běhu 10. století, se podepsala na spodním okraji zvonu přilby, kam byl přinýtovaný držák barmice, tvořený přehnutým stříbrným páskem. Z tohoto držáku se dnes dochovaly pouze fragmentární proužky na vnějším a vnitřním okraji. Tento typ držáku představuje velmi pracnou a vysoce funkční ochranu; do ohybu pásku jsou vysekány nebo vystříhány zářezy, do kterých se postupně vkládají kroužky držící barmici a skrz ně se protahuje drát. Tuto sofistikovanou metodu známe u nejméně deseti dalších raně středověkých přileb, u kterých je pásek vyroben ze železa, mosazi nebo pozlaceného bronzu (Vlasatý 2015a). Součástí svatovítského pokladu střeženého v Praze je kromě jiného i kroužková zbroj. Ke kroužkové zbroji přináleží tzv. pláštík, obdélníkový pruh pletiva, jehož horní část – „stojací límec“ o rozměru 50×7,5 cm – je lemována třemi řadami kroužků z téměř ryzího zlata (Schránil 1934). Na samotném vrcholu límce se nachází jedna řada železných kroužků, která navazuje na zlaté kroužky. Detailní rozbor potvrdil, že límec je složen ze stejných kroužků jako brň, ale odlišuje se od zbytku pláštíku. Badatelé (Bernart – Bravermanová – Ledvina 2014: 180181) předpokládají, že límec mohl být ze všeho nejdříve stojacím límcem u kroužkové zbroje, ze které byl posléze sňat a byl využit jako závěs na přilbici, kde byl uchycen řadou železných kroužků, které navazují na zlaté lemování. Barmice byla z přilby sňata zřejmě za vlády Karla IV. a našla uplatnění jako základ pláštíku, ke kterému byla dopletena větší část do podoby, kterou vidíme dnes. Vzhledem k původní délce 7,5 cm a použití stříbrného držáku se zdá, že tato část přilby byla čistě dekorativní.

vaclav-limecDetail límce pláštíku se zlatým lemováním.
Zdroj: Bernart 2010: obr. 37.

Další zásah, který zřejmě proběhl současně s výše uvedenou změnou, byla instalace nánosku a obroučky. U tohoto bodu se zastavíme déle, protože nánosku se v minulosti věnovala celá řada badatelů a spousta názorů, jak se pokusím ukázat, byla zcela zavádějící a pramenila z neznalosti širších souvislostí. Nánosek má křížový tvar o výšce 14,7 cm, šířce 18,5 cm a tloušťce až 5 mm. Na třech svých koncích je uchycen velkými železnými nýty. Očnice jsou na horních okrajích lalokovitě vykrajovány a zvýrazňují obočí. Vlastní nánosek svou délkou 6,3 cm a šířkou 3,3 cm kopíruje nos. Z profilu se nánosek jeví jako prohnutý, což je podle Miloše Bernarta způsobeno pádem na spodní hranu nánosku. Uprostřed spodního okraje ochrany nosu vybíhá krátký trn neznámé funkce, dříve mohl být teoreticky rozšířen v háček, který můžeme vidět na typologicky podobné přilbě z Olomouci a který mohl být určen k zavěšení barmice chránící obličej. Křížovitý tvar nánosku má nejbližší analogii v nánosku z přilby z bosenské Trnčiny, která je datována do 10.–11. století (D’Amato 2015: 67, Pl. 5) a která je druhým exemplářem přilby s jednokusovým zvonem a dodatečným nánoskem. Spodní okraj zvonu svatováclavské přilby byl kolem dokola olemován obroučkou, která překrývala stříbrný držák barmice a která ústila pod nánoskem. Byla uchycena řadou nýtů a dvěma velkými nýty nánosku; nýty držící obroučku byly na vnitřní straně zajištěny měděnými podložkami. Do dnešního dne se zachovaly zhruba tři čtvrtiny této obroučky, která se v minulosti zřejmě rozbila natolik, že bylo nutné ji přichytit výspravkami. Dekorativní obroučky přileb jsou nepříliš běžným rysem, který známe především z východní Evropy. Nejbližší analogii obroučky tvoří zřejmě ozdoba přilby z ukrajinské Nemie, která je datovaná do 11. století (Kirpičnikov 1971: Tabl. IX).

svatovaclavska_prilbaSchématická rekonstrukce přilby kolem roku 1000.
Převzato ze stránek Českého rozhlasu.

Povrch nánosku a obroučky je zdobený metodou overlay neboli enkrustace, což je metoda užívající nasekání podkladového materiálu v několika směrech, do něhož je posléze vtepáván dražší kov (Fuglesang 1980: 125–126; Moilanen 2015: 276–277). V případě nánosku je podklad nadrážkován ve třech směrech; tento fakt je dobře patrný na rentgenových snímcích a na některých místech i prostým okem. Obroučka je s největší pravděpodobností zdobena stejným způsobem. Použitým vtepávaným materiálem byl stříbrný drát nebo plát. Analýza potvrdila také stopy mědi, zlata, olova a zinku v korozi, nikoli však ve výzdobě (osobní diskuze s Milošem Bernartem). Podle Vegarda Vikeho je použitým materiálem dochované dekorace stříbrný drát, který byl mechanicky zaklíněn do zářezů, a vypadané výplně obrysů mohl tvořit drát ze slitiny mědi. Podle Miloše Bernarta, Petra Floriánka a Jeffa Pringleho byly vypadané výplně původně vylity niellem, které postupem času vypadalo. Nejbližšími analogickými přilbami, které měly masky zdobené metodou overlay, pocházejí z gotlandského Lokrume a ukrajinského Kyjeva (Vlasatý 2015b; Vlasatý 2018). Fragment přilby z Lokrume je navíc dekorován stejnými motivy, jako obroučka svatováclavské přilby. Metoda aplikující overlay se běžně objevuje na zbraních a jezdeckém vybavení zhruba od roku 950 do počátku 12. století v Anglii a ve Skandinávii, odkud se tato metoda mohla šířit do okolních zemí spolu s motivy touto metodou dosahovaných. Stejně jako v případě nově objeveného meče z Lázní Toušeň, je extrémně složité stanovit místo původu, protože šíření módy zahrnovalo i proces výroby, nejen finální výrobky. Metoda overlay nám tedy pouze naznačuje, že tu máme co dělat s předmětem, který s největší pravděpodobností pochází ze severní nebo východní Evropy.

Wenceslas_noseguard-ChristDetail nánosku svatováclavské přilby.
Zdroj: Vegard Vike.

Věřím však, že motivy, kterými je touto metodou dosaženo na nánosku, nám mohou pomoci blíže lokalizovat místo výroby. K nelibosti všech, kteří by v postavě umístěné na nánosku chtěli vidět severského boha Óðina (např. Merhautová 1992; Merhautová 2000; Sommer 2001: 32), je nutné s konečnou platností tuto myšlenku zavrhnout. Jedná se rané vyobrazení ukřižovaného Ježíše Krista (jak tvrdili Benda, Hejdová a Schránil), které má v evropském prostoru řadu paralel až do 12. století (Fuglesang 1981; Staecker 1999). Jeho funkce na nánosku je snadno čitelná – má reprezentovat křesťanského nositele, znázorňovat formuli Kristova vykoupení a jeho druhý příchod, vzbuzovat úžas a děs nepřátel. Jestliže Merhautová (2000: 91) píše, že „ukřižovaný Kristus nebyl a jako vítěz nad smrtí ani nemohl být zobrazován holohlavý, ani s podobně řvoucími ústy a s rozježeným knírem (…)“, pak to svědčí o zásadní neznalosti archeologického materiálu, který si nyní musíme ukázat na příkladu nálezů křížků, dřevorytů i militárií.

jellingRaná vyobrazení Krista skandinávského původu. Větší rozlišení zde.
Kámen z Jellingu, odlitek z Haithabu, dřevěná figura z jellinské mohyly, křížek z hrobu 660 v Birce.

krizkyVyobrazení Krista ze severní a západní Evropy v období 9.–12. století.
Větší rozlišení zde.
Zdroj: Staecker 1999: Abb. 59, 61, 68, 79; Kat. Nr. 14, 43, 46, 49, 51a, 53a, 54, 60, 65, 74, 81, 86, 100, 116a.

jezis_mecePostavy interpretované jako Ježíš na hlavicích mečů z 11. století.
Meče z Pady (Estonsko) a Ålu (Norsko). Zdroj: Ebert 1914: 121 a katalog Unimus.no.

Rozeberme si nyní jednotlivé části dekorace nánosku. Nejvíce pozornosti bylo věnováno hlavě postavy, která – ačkoli není dobře dochována – má dvě vytřeštěné oči, otevřená ústa se čnícími zuby, husté vousy rozvětvené do několika pramenů a korunu neurčitelného tvaru. Tyto rysy byly v minulosti považovány za důvod, proč postavu nebylo možné akceptovat jako ukřižovaného Ježíše Krista. Všechny z nich však můžeme najít v raném křesťanském umění západní, střední, severní a východní Evropy 9.–12. století. Nejbližší podobnost vykazuje obličej Ukřižovaného z kříže nalezeného ve Stora Uppakrå ve Švédsku (11. století; Staecker 1999: Kat. Nr. 51). Rovněž z 11. století pochází meč nalezený v norském Ålu (C36640), který má na hlavici znázorněného Krista s vyceněnými zuby, vousy, vytřeštěným pohledem a trojcípou korunou na hlavě (diskuze s Vegardem Vikem). Pokud bychom se pokusili naznačit podobu koruny, pak můžeme poukázat na analogie, u kterých se nad hlavou Ukřižovaného nacházejí kříže, kosočtverce s motivy kříže, ruka Boží, svatozáře či čapky, přičemž tvarově nejpodobnější se zdá být kosočtverec s motivem kříže nebo ruka Boží. Naznačené rysy náleží Bohu hněvivému, ze kterého je třeba mít bázeň, což je příznačné pro období do roku 1000, kdy byla křesťanská Evropa sužována nájezdy. Ježíš Kristus byl v nově christianizovaných zemích zprvu počítán za jednoho z pantheonu (Bednaříková 2009: 94), a svoji pozici si musel vydobýt ukázkou síly, nikoli smířlivými a pokornými gesty.

hlavaHlavy Ukřižovaného v evropském umění, 9.–12. století. Větší rozlišení zde.
Zdroj: Staecker 1999.

Také paže, které jsou ovinuty dvěma páry náramkům podobným kruhů, byly v minulosti považovány jako důvod, proč postavu nebylo možné akceptovat jako ukřižovaného Ježíše Krista. Dobová ikonografie je však v přímém rozporu – naopak se zdá, že raná vyobrazení Ježíše Krista velmi často vyobrazují Ježíše přivázaného, nejen přibitého na kříž (Fuglesang 1981). Kruhy tak reprezentují smyčky poutající ruce anebo nařasené rukávy tuniky, které má postava na sobě. Pozice rukou s palci orientovanými vzhůru je pak rys neoddiskutovatelně spjatý právě s Ježíšem na kříži. Z rentgenového snímku a detailních fotografiích se navíc zdá, že se na dlaních pod palci mohla nacházet stigmata nebo hřeby. Paže se zdají být zlomené, k čemuž nacházíme nejbližší analogie na krucifixu z maďarského Peceszentmártonu (12. století; Jakab 2006).

rukaRuce Ukřižovaného v evropském a tureckém umění, 9.–12. století.
Větší rozlišení zde. Zdroj: Staecker 1999 a kámen z Jellingu.

Tělo postavy na nánosku se zdá být oděno do tuniky nebo suknice, která je přepásaná v oblasti pasu velkým poutajícím opaskem nebo smyčkou. Suknice je zdobena protilehlými čarami, které tvoří motiv rybí kosti. Rovněž k těmto detailům můžeme najít řadu paralel v dobové ikonografii, zejména svázaný pás je v severském umění rozšířený. Co se týče nohou, jejich dekorace je prakticky vypadaná, takže je není možné rekonstruovat; je však evidentní, že směřovaly od sebe, což by se mohlo jevit jako neobvyklý rys, avšak opět k němu existují paralely.

hrud-pasTělo Ukřižovaného v evropském umění, 9.–12. století.
Větší rozlišení zde. Zdroj: Staecker 1999 a nálezy z Jellingu.

Nohy Ukřižovaného v evropském umění, 9.–12. století.
Větší rozlišení zde. Zdroj: Staecker 1999.

Nad korunou ukřižované postavy se nachází neúplně zachovalý pletencový ornament, který vyplňuje plochu zužujícího se nánosku. Tento motiv nápadně připomíná výplňové propletence, jež se vyskytují na záštitách mečů typů L, R, S, T (Petersen 1919) a na tulejkách kopí (viz např. Fuglesang 1980). Proplence z mečů, které mají své těžiště v 2. polovině 10. století, jsou bližší analogií, zatímco dekorace na kopí, která se rozvíjí do komplikovanějších forem zařaditelných do stylu Ringerike, lze zařadit do konce 10. až třetí čtvrtiny 11. století (Fuglesang 1980: 18; Wilson – Klindt-Jensen 1966: 146).

strelka
Pletencový ornament na zbraních ze Skandinávie a Estonska, 10.–11. století.
Zdroj: Jets 2012: Fig. 1 a katalog Unimus.no.

Nad pažemi a vedle nich se nacházejí jednoduché trojcípé ornamenty a propletené smyčky. Jejich pozice je vůči nánosku symetrická. Zdá se, že tento dekor měl jednoduše vyplnit prázdný prostor, který by jinak vznikl. Jako analogii trojcípých ozdob můžeme jmenovat trikvetry z jellinského kamene, umístěné nad pažemi a vedle obličeje u Ukřižovaného. Paralely pokračují: trojcípé ornamenty nalezneme nad pažemi postavy na hlavici meče z Pady a vedle obličeje na hlavici meče z Ålu lze spatřit dva křížky. Smyčky, které se nacházejí mezi dlaněmi a velkými nýty na koncích očnic, mají analogii jak na smyčce vyobrazené na záštitě meče z lotyšského Telšiai (Tomsons 2008: 94, 5. att), tak ve vlnovkách, které jsou umístěné pod rukama Ukřižovaného na křížku ze švédského Gullunge (přelom 11.-12. století) a finského Halikka (12. století). V případě křížku z Hallika mohou vlnovky znázorňovat například mraky nebo vzdušné proudy, neboť prostor nad hlavou postavy je vyplněn nebeskými tělesy (Měsíc a Slunce) a celá kompozice může znázorňovat Ježíše jako pána nebes. Některé křížky byzantské tradice vyobrazují vedle rukou Ukřižovaného okřídlené anděly. V jiných případech je prostor pod rukama postavy vyplněn texty nebo hlavami postav, a tak nelze vyloučit, že by ornament mohl mít podobný apotropaický význam.

vlnovka
Jednoduchý ornament : svatováclavská přilba, Gullunge, Halikko.
Zdroj: Staecker 1999: Kat. Nr. 112, Abb. 96.

Dekoraci obroučky můžeme zhodnotit jako typický pletencový ornament stylu Borre, který má bohaté analogie v zemích, které měly co do činění se skandinávským vlivem, tedy zhruba v prostoru od Velké Británie po Rusko. Ve Skandinávii je styl Borre datován do období od 1. poloviny 9. století do 2. poloviny 10. století. V Polsku, kde se styl Borre ujal a zdomácněl, se ho užívalo k dekorování ještě v průběhu 11. století (Jaworski et al. 2013: 302). Ornament tohoto druhu můžeme spatřit jak na fragmentu přilby z Lokrume, tak na četných mečích typu R a S a zřejmě bychom jej nalezli i na dalších militáriích. Propletené smyčky, avšak jiného tvaru, lze spatřit i na obroučce přilby z ukrajinské Nemie.

Emblems_1-5
Pletencová ornamentika užitá na mečích typu R a S ze severní, střední a východní Evropy.
Vytvořil Tomáš Cajthaml.

obrouckaObroučky svatováclavské přilby a přilby z Nemie.
Zdroj: Schránil 1934: Tab. XIII; Kirpičnikov 1971: Tab. IX.

Pokud bychom měli navrhnout místo výroby těchto dekorovaných komponentů, Skandinávie, a to zejména ostrov Gotland, se rozhodně jeví jako nejpravděpodobnější (Schránil 1934Benda 1972; Merhautová 2000Bravermannová 2012; Bernart – Bravermanová – Ledvina 2014), nicméně možností je více. Potenciálním kandidátem může být také území Polska, Pobaltí, Finska, Ruska nebo Ukrajiny, nikoli však Porýní (Hejdová 1964196619671968). Do středu Evropy se mohly dostat polskou cestou, která byla do 70. let 10. století otevřená dokořán díky svazku polského Měška s českou princeznou Doubravou, sestrou Boleslava II. Avšak ani pozdější import není vyloučen, protože jak ukazují Ethelredovy denáry, které byly v Čechách kopírovány a dodávány zpět do prostoru Baltského moře, cesta přes Polsko byla prostupná i v 80. a 90. letech 10. století (Lutovský – Petráň 2004: 95; Petráň 2006: 168).

Svatováclavská přilba je kompilát několika původně nesouvisejících dílů, který byl složen nejspíše na popud Boleslava II. za účelem podpoření kultu sv. Václava. V průběhu věků několikrát změnila svoji podobu a byla opakovaně opravována. Historická a kulturní hodnota tohoto exponátu je nevyčíslitelná. V současné době je přilba vystavena na Pražském hradě, kde se těší značné pozornosti z domova i zahraničí.

Svatováclavská přilba se zářícím nánoskem.
Zdroj: Jan Gloc, Správa Pražského hradu.


Bibliografie

Bednaříková, Jarmila (2009). Ansgar a problémy misií na evropském severu. In: Křesťanstvo v časoch sv. Vojtěcha, Kraków, s. 85–103

Benda, Klement (1972). Svatováclavská přilba ve výtvarném vývoji přemyslovských Čech. In: Umění 20, č. 2, s. 114–148.

Bernart, Miloš (2010). Raně středověké přílby, zbroje a štíty z Českých zemí, Praha: Univerzita Karlova.

Bernart, Miloš  Bravermanová, Milena  Ledvina, Petr (2014). Arma sancti Venceslai: nová zjištění o přilbě, zbroji a meči zv. Svatováclavské. In: Časopis Společnosti přátel starožitností, Roč. 122, č. 3, s. 179182.

Bravermanová, Milena (2012). The so-called armour of St. Wenceslaus – a historical introduction. In: Acta Militaria Mediaevalia, VIII, Kraków – Rzeszów – Sanok 2011, s. 213–220.

D’Amato, Raffaele (2015). Old and new evidence on the East-Roman helmets from the 9th to the 12th centuries. In: Acta Militaria Mediaevalia, tom XI, red. Piotr N. Kotowicz, Kraków – Wrocław – Sanok, s. 27–157.

Ebert, Max (1914). Zu den Beziehungen der Ostseeprovinzen mit Skandinavien in der ersten Hälfte des 11. Jahrhunderts. In: Baltische Studien zur Archäologie und Geschichte : Arbeiten der Baltischen vorbereitenden Komitees für den XVI. Archäologischen Kongress in Pleskau 1914, Berlin, s. 117–139.

Fuglesang, Signe Horn (1980). Some Aspects of the Ringerike Style : A phase of 11th century Scandinavian art, Odense.

Fuglesang, Signe Horn (1981). Crucifixion iconography in Viking Scandinavia. In: Hans Bekker-Nielsen – Peter Foote – Olaf Olsen (eds.). Proceedings of the Eighth Viking Congress. Århus 24-31 August 1977, Odense, s. 73–94.

Hejdová, Dagmar (1964). Přilba zvaná „svatováclavská“. In: Sborník Národního muzea v Praze, A 18, č. 1–2, s. 1–106.

Hejdová Dagmar (1966). Der sogenannte St.-Wenzels-Helm (1. Teil). In: Waffen und Kostümkunde 8/2, s. 95–110.

Hejdová Dagmar (1967). Der sogenannte St.-Wenzels-Helm (Fortsetzung). In: Waffen und Kostümkunde 9/1, s. 28–54.

Hejdová Dagmar (1968). Der sogenannte St.-Wenzels-Helm (Fortsetzung und Schluß). In: Waffen und Kostümkunde 10/1, s. 15–30.

Jakab, Attila (2006). Bronzkorpuszok a nyíregyházi Jósa András Múzeum gyűjteményében (Bronze crucifixes in the collection of the Jósa András Musem). In: JAMÉ 48, s. 261–280.

Jaworski, Krzysztof et al. (2013). Artefacts of Scandinavian origin from the Cathedral Island (Ostrow Tumski) in Wroclaw. In: Scandinavian culture in medieval Poland, Wroclaw, s. 279–314

Jets, Indrek (2012). Scandinavian late Viking Age art styles as a part of the visual display of warriors in 11th century Estonia. In: Estonian Journal of Archaeology, 2012, 16/2, 118–139.

Kirpičnikov 1971 = Кирпичников А. Н. (1971). Древнерусское оружие: Вып. 3. Доспех, комплекс боевых средств IX—XIII вв., АН СССР, Москва.

Lutovský, Michal – Petráň, Zdeněk (2004). Slavníkovci, Praha.

Moilanen, Mikko (2015). Marks of Fire, Value and Faith : Swords with Ferrous Inlays in Finland During the Late Iron Age (ca. 700–1200 AD), Turku.

Merhautová, Anežka. (1992) Der St. Wenzelshelm. In: Umění 40, č. 3, s. 169–179.

Merhautová, Anežka (2000). Vznik a význam svatováclavské přilby. In: Přemyslovský stát kolem roku 1000 : na paměť knížete Boleslava II. (+ 7. února 999), Praha: 85–92.

Petersen, Jan (1919). De Norske Vikingesverd: En Typologisk-Kronologisk Studie Over Vikingetidens Vaaben, Kristiania.

Petráň, Zdeněk (2006). České mincovnictví 10. století. In: České země v raném středověku, Praha, s. 161–174.

Schránil, Josef (1934). O zbroji sv. Václava. In: Svatováclavský sborník na památku 1000. výročí smrti knížete Václava svatého. I – Kníže Václav svatý a jeho doba, Praha, s. 159172.

Sommer, Petr (2001). Začátky křesťanství v Čechách: kapitoly z dějin raně středověké duchovní kultury, Praha.

Staecker, Jörn (1999). Rex regum et dominus dominorum. Die wikingerzeitlichen Kreuz- und Kruzifixanhänger als Ausdruck der Mission in Altdänemark und Schweden, Stockholm.

Tomsons, Artūrs (2008). Kuršu (T1 tipa) zobeny rokturu ornaments 11. – 13. gs. In: Latvijas Nacionālā Vēstures muzeja raksti, No. 14, s. 85104.

Vlasatý, Tomáš (2015a). Další fragment přilby z Birky. In: Projekt Forlǫg: Reenactment a věda [online]. [cit. 2018-09-08]. Dostupné z: http://sagy.vikingove.cz/dalsi-fragment-prilby-zbirky/

Vlasatý, Tomáš (2015b). Přilba z Lokrume. In: Projekt Forlǫg: Reenactment a věda [online]. [cit. 2018-09-08]. Dostupné z: http://sagy.vikingove.cz/prilba-z-lokrume/

Vlasatý, Tomáš (2018). Přilba z Kyjeva. In: Projekt Forlǫg: Reenactment a věda [online]. [cit. 2018-09-08]. Dostupné z:  http://sagy.vikingove.cz/prilba-z-kyjeva/

Wilson, David M. – Klindt-Jensen, Ole (1966). Viking Art, London.