Origins of the “vegvísir” symbol

After publishing the very successful article regarding origins of the “kolovrat” symbol, I was requested to write a similar article about a symbol, which came to be known as “vegvísir” (literally “The pointer of the way”, “Wayfinder”) among those interested in Norse mythology. In this case, the situation is much simpler in comparison to other symbols. In the following article, we will take a look at various nowadays interpretations of the symbol, as well as its true origin.

Development of depictions of the “vegvísir” from 19th century till today.
Source: Foster 2013 – 2015.


Modern concept of “vegvísir”

Nowadays, “vegvísir” is famous among neo-pagans, musicians, reenactors and especially fans of TV series and other mass-production revolving around the Viking Age. We cannot omit its use in clothing industry, also often seen as a jewellery or tattoo. Reenactors tend to use it as shield decoration or costume embroidery. Among this inconsistent group of people, it is often accepted for “vegvísir” to be “a Germanic and Viking ancient magical rune symbol, which function was that of a compass and was supposed to protect the Viking warriors during seafaring, providing guidance and protection from Gods”. Such an interpretation can only be found in popular literature though, and in romantic fiction created in the past 30 years.


Vegvísir“ tattoo. Source: http://nextluxury.com/.


The origin of “vegvísir“

The symbol that we call “vegvísir” can be found in three Icelandic grimoires from the 19th century. The first and most important one of them – the Huld manuscript (signature ÍB 383 4to) – was composed by Geir Vigfússon (1813-1880) in Akureyri in 1860. The manuscript consists of 27 paper lists contains 30 magical symbols in total. The “vegvísir” is depicted at the page 60 (27r) and is marked with numbers XXVII and XXIX. It is complemented by another, further unspecified symbol and a following note (Foster 2015: 10):

Beri maður stafi þessa á sér villist maður ekki í hríðum né vondu veðri þó ókunnugur sé.”

“Carry this sign with you and you will not get lost in storms or bad weather, even though in unfamiliar surrounds.”

Among other very similar symbols which can be found in the Huld manuscript belong to the “Solomon’s sigil” (Salómons Insigli; nr. XXI) and “Sign against a thief” (Þjófastafur; nr. XXVIII).

The second grimoire known as “Book of spells” (Galdrakver) survived in a manuscript with designation Lbs 2917 a 4to. It was written by Olgeir Geirsson (1842-1880) in Akureyri during the years 1868-1869. The manuscript contains 58 pages, with “vegvísir” depicted on page 27 as a symbol nr. 27. It is accompanied by a text partially written in Latin, partially in runes:

Beri maður þennan staf á sér mun maður trauðla villast í hríð eða verða úti og eins rata ókunnugur.

“Carry this sign with you and you will not get lost in storms or die of cold bad weather, and will easily find his way from the unknown.”

Among other very similar symbols which can be found in the Huld manuscript belong to the “Solomon’s sigil” (Salómons Insigli; nr. XXI) and “Sign against a thief” (Þjófastafur; nr. XXVIII).

The third grimoire is yet another “Book of spells” (Galdrakver), this time preserved in a manuscript with designation Lbs 4627 8vo. While the author, place and time of creation are unknown, we are certain that it was written in 19th century in the Eyjafjord area, which again is close to Akureyri. The manuscript consists of 32 pages and “vegvísir” is depicted on page 17v. Within the manuscript, we can also find more similar symbols than just the “Solomon’s sigil” and “Mark against a thief”. The text accompanying this symbol is rather unique, and the following translation is the very first attempt since the exploration of the manuscript in 1993. From the text it is clear the functionality of the symbol was conditioned by true Christian faith:

At maður villist ekki : geim þennan staf undir þinni vinstri hendi, hann heitir Vegvísir og mun hann duga þér, hefir þú trú á honum – ef guði villt trúa i Jesu nafni – þýðing þessa stafs er falinn i þessum orðum að þú ei i (…) forgangir. Guð gefi mér til lukku og blessunar i Jesu nafni.”

“To avoid getting lost: keep this sign under your left arm, its name is Vegvísir and it will serve you if you believe in it – if you believe in God in the name of Jesus – the meaning of this sign is hidden in these words, so you may not perish. May God give me luck and blessing in the name of Jesus.”

 

Symbols from manuscripts ÍB 383 4to (27r), Lbs 2917 a 4to (27), Lbs 4627 8vo 17v).

Along with other symbols, the “vegvísir” came to Iceland most likely from England, where star-shaped symbols can be tracked as early as 15th century, such as “The Solomon’s testament” (Harley MS 5596, 31r). The original symbols had their meaning in Christian mysticism. A more thorough research might confirm the use of sigil magic even in earlier periods.

The first literature containing the Icelandic version of “vegvísir” symbol along with translation to German was most likely an article by Ólaf Davíðsson on Icelandic magical marks and books from 1903 (Davíðsson 1903: 278, Pl. V). The second time the symbol appeared in literature was in 1940 with Eggertson’s book about magic (Eggertson 1940: column 49; Eggertson 2015: 126). It is often incorrectly believed that “vegvísir” is also depicted in “The Book of spells” (Galdrabók). This mystification appeared at the end of 1980s, when Stephen Flowers publicised his paper The Galdrabók: An Icelandic Grimoire, in which the “vegvísir” does indeed appear (on page 88), but only in a side note on Icelandic grimoires. So how comes the symbol is so popular these days?

We believe the author Stephen Flowers played the main part in propagation of the symbol, thanks to the intense promotion of his paper during the beginning era of the Internet. That was in times of growing interest in Old Norse culture and emerging re-enactment community. Those interested in the topic, arguably due to lack of better resources than on purpose, based their research on the best available book with symbols that had a certain feel of authenticity due to being based on Icelandic origin. With its increasing popularity, the “vegvísir” also became an attractive article for online shops targeting this particular market, as well as for Icelandic tourist shops (see Tourism on Iceland), which still promote the “vegvísir” as an “authentic Viking symbol” due to commercial reasons. Another notable promoter of the symbol was the Icelandic singer Björk, who had it tattooed in 1982 and began to describe it as “an ancient Viking symbol, which seafarers painted with coal on their foreheads to find the correct way” since 1990s (gudmundsdottirbjork.blogspot.com). This caused “vegvísir” to become a part of tattoo artists’s portfolios, and at the moment the two mentioned influences intersected, the symbol became one of the most often tattooed motives in the neo-pagan, musical, re-enactment and Old Norse interest communities.

It is important to note that nowadays the circular variants, sometimes accompanied by rune alphabet, are the most used, although the original versions were of squarish shape and are without any runes.


Conclusion

The symbol known as “vegvísir” is Icelandic folk feature borrowed from continental occult magic “Solomon’s testament”. It is about 160 years old and its use is limited to the 2nd half of 19th century in an Icelandic city of Akureyri. The only literary sources we have from the Icelandic tradition are few mentions in three manuscripts, which are based on each other. The “vegvísir” is not a symbol used or originating in the Viking Age, and due to the 800 years gap should not be connected to it. The original Icelandic “vegvísir” is of square shape, with the circular variants emerging in the 20th century. Its current popularity is tied to the spread of the Internet and strong promotion in an on-line medium, that is easily accessible by the current users of the symbol.

I would love to express my thanks to my friends who inspired me towards composing this article, as well as those who provided me with the much-needed advice. My gratitude goes to Václav Maňha for the initial idea, to Marianne Guckelsberger for corrections on the Icelandic text and to René Dieken for providing me with various English sources.


Literature

Davíðsson, Ólafur (1903). Isländische Zauberzeichen und Zauberbücher. In: Zeitschrift des Vereins für Volkskunde 13, p. 150-167, 267-279, pls. III-VIII.

Eggertson, Jochum M. (1940). Galdraskræða Skugga, Reykjavík : Jólagjöfin.

Eggertsson, Jochum M. (2015). Sorcerer’s Screed : The Icelandic Book of Magic Spells, Reykjavík : Lesstofan.

Flowers, Stephen (1989). The Galdrabók: An Icelandic Grimoire, York Beach, Me. : S. Weiser.

Foster, Justin (2013 – 2015). Vegvísir (Path Guide). In: Galdrastafir: Icelandic Magical Staves. Available at:
http://users.on.net/~starbase/galdrastafir/vegvisir.htm

Foster, Justin (2015). The Huld Manuscript – ÍB 383 4to : A modern transcription, decryption and translation. Available at:
https://www.academia.edu/13008560/Huld_Manuscript_of_Galdrastafir_Witchcraft_Magic_Symbols_and_Runes_-_English_Translation

Původ symbolu „vegvísir“

Po úspěšném článku o původu symbolu „kolovrat“ jsem byl osloven, abych vytvořil obdobný článek o symbolu, který mezi zájemci o severskou problematiku proslul jako „vegvísir“ (doslova Ukazatel cesty). V tomto případě je situace daleko jednodušší než v případě jiných symbolů. V následujícím krátkém článku si ukážeme, jaké významy se dnes symbolu přičítají a jaký je jeho skutečný původ.

Vývoj zobrazování symbolu „vegvísir“ od 19. století dodnes.
Zdroj: Foster 2013 – 2015.

Moderní užití symbolu „vegvísir“

Symbol „vegvísir“ je oblíbený mezi novopohany, hudebníky, šermíři a zejména fanoušky televizních seriálů a jiné masové produkce týkající se doby vikinské. Chybět nesmí na oblečení, často jej můžeme spatřit jako přívěšek nebo jako tetování. Šermíři jej navíc často malují na štíty nebo je vyšívají na své kostýmy. Mezi touto velmi nesourodou skupinou lidí se má zato, že „vegvísir“ je „germánský a vikinský starodávný magický runový symbol, který sloužil jako kompas a který měl za úkol chránit vikinské bojovníky při mořeplavbách a zajišťovat pomoc a ochranu bohů“. Takovouto interpretaci však nalezneme pouze v populární literatuře a v červené knihovně vytvořené v posledních třiceti letech.


Tetovaný „vegvísir“. http://nextluxury.com/.

 

Původ symbolu „vegvísir“

Symbol, který takto nazýváme, se nachází ve třech islandských grimoárech z 19. století. První a nejznámější z nich, tzv. rukopis Huld (signatura ÍB 383 4to), byl sepsán Geirem Vigfússonem (1813-1880) v Akureyri roku 1860. Rukopis sestávající z 27 papírových listů obsahuje 30 magických značek. „Vegvísir“ je vyobrazen na stránce 60 (27r) a mezi symboly má číslo XXVII a XXIX. Je doprovázen dalším, blíže nespecifikovaným znakem a marginálií v tomto znění (Foster 2015: 10):

Beri maður stafi þessa á sér villist maður ekki í hríðum né vondu veðri þó ókunnugur sé.

Má-li člověk s sebou tento znak, neztratí se v bouřích ni v nečasu, i když je v neznámu.

 

Mezi další velmi podobné symboly, které bychom nalezli v rukopisu Huld, patří „Šalomounův sigil“ (Salómons Insigli; číslo XXI) a „Znak proti zloději“ (Þjófastafur; číslo XXVIII).

Druhý grimoár se označuje jako „Kniha zaříkávadel“ (Galdrakver) a zachoval se v rukopisu se signaturou Lbs 2917 a 4to. Autorem je Olgeir Geirsson (1842-1880), který jej sepsal v letech 1868-1869 opět v Akureyri. Rukopis sestává z 58 stran, „vegvísir“ je znázorněn na straně 27 jako znak č. 27. Doplňuje jej text částečně psaný latinkou, částečně runami:

Beri maður þennan staf á sér mun maður trauðla villast í hríð eða verða úti og eins rata ókunnugur.

Má-li člověk s sebou tento znak, sotva se ztratí v bouři nebo zemře podchlazením a najde cestu z neznáma.

 

I v tomto rukopisu nalezneme podobné symboly „Šalomounův sigil“ (Salómons Insigli; číslo XIX) a „Znak proti zloději“ (Þjófastafur; číslo XXIX).

Třetím grimoárem je další „Kniha zaříkávadel“ (Galdrakver), tentokráte z rukopisu se signaturou Lbs 4627 8vo. Není znám autor, místo ani přesné datum vzniku, ale je jisté, že rukopis pochází z 19. století a že vznikl v oblasti Eyjafjordu, tedy opět poblíž Akureyri. Rukopis sestává z 32 stran a „vegvísir“ je nakreslen na straně 17v. V tomto rukopisu najdeme více podobných symbolů, než jen „Šalomounův sigil“ a „Znak proti zloději“. Text, který se k symbolu „vegvísir“ vztahuje, je v tomto rukopisu unikátní a zde přiložený přepis je vůbec první od objevu rukopisu roku 1993. Z textu je patrné, že funkčnost symbolu byla podmíněna upřímnou křesťanskou vírou:

At maður villist ekki : geim þennan staf undir þinni vinstri hendi, hann heitir Vegvísir og mun hann duga þér, hefir þú trú á honum – ef guði villt trúa i Jesu nafni – þýðing þessa stafs er falinn i þessum orðum að þú ei i (…) forgangir. Guð gefi mér til lukku og blessunar i Jesu nafni.

Aby se člověk neztratil : pod svou levou rukou měj tento znak, který se jmenuje ‚Vegvísir’. Pokud v něj věříš, poslouží ti – pokud věříš Bohu ve jméně Ježíše – význam toho znaku je v těchto slovech, takže nezahyneš. Dej mi Bůh štěstí a požehnání ve jméně Ježíšově.“

 

Symboly z rukopisů ÍB 383 4to (27r), Lbs 2917 a 4to (27), Lbs 4627 8vo (17v).

Na Island „vegvísir“ společně s jinými symboly dostal zřejmě z Anglie, kde můžeme nalézt hvězdovité symboly již v 15. století, například v tzv. „Šalamounově testamentu“ (Harley MS 5596, 31r). Původní symboly měly svůj význam v rámci okultní křesťanské mystiky. Detailnější výzkum by mohl potvrdit používání sigilové magie i ve starším období.

První literaturou, do které byla islandská verze symbol zahrnuta i s překladem do němčiny, je zřejmě článek Ólafa Davíðssona o islandských magických znameních a knihách z roku 1903 (Davíðsson 1903: 278, Pl. V). Podruhé se symbol dostal do literatury roku 1940 s Eggertsonovou knihou o magii (Eggertson 1940: sloupec 49; Eggertson 2015: 126). Často se soudí, že „vegvísir“ je vyobrazen také v „Knize zaklínadel“ (Galdrabók), ale není to pravda. Tato mystifikace vznikla až na konci 80. let 20. století, kdy Stephen Flowers publikoval svoji práci The Galdrabók: An Icelandic Grimoire, v níž je sice „vegvísir“ objevuje (str. 88), ale pouze ve vedlejší kapitole věnované jiným islandským grimoárům. Proč je však symbol dnes tak populární?

Věříme, že na velký podíl na propagaci tohoto symbolu měl právě autor Stephen Flowers, který své dílo horlivě prosadil na začínajícím internetu, a to zejména v době, kdy se formoval zájem o staroseverskou látku a vznikala reenactmentová uskupení. Zájemci z těchto řad, spíše z nedostatku lepších podkladů než záměrně, využili nejlépe dostupnou knihu se symboly, které v sobě díky islandskému původu měly punc autentičnosti. Se sílící popularitou se symbolu chopily jak internetové obchody cílící na tento segment trhu, tak obchody pro turisty na Islandu (viz turismus na Islandu), které „vegvísir“ z komerčních důvodů dosud inzerují jako původní vikinský symbol. Dalším významným propagátorem tohoto symbolu byla islandská zpěvačka Björk, která si jej nechala vytetovat roku 1982 a od 90. let jej v rozhovorech popisovala jako „prastarý vikinský symbol, který si námořníci malovali uhlem na čelo, aby nalezli správnou cestu“ (gudmundsdottirbjork.blogspot.com). „Vegvísir“ se tímto dostal do portfolií tatérů, a ve chvíli, kdy se oba zmíněné vlivy protnuly, se symbol stal jedním z nejčastěji tetovaných motivů v komunitě novopohanů, posluchačů hudby, šermířů a jiných zájemců o starý Sever.

Je nutné zmínit, že v současné době se nejčastěji užívají kruhové varianty, někdy doprovázené runovovou abecedou. Původní verze však mají čtvercový nebo přibližně čtvercový tvar a nejsou doprovázeny runami.

Závěr a poděkování

Symbol zvaný „vegvísir“ je islandskou zlidovělou výpůjčkou z kontinentální okultní magie „Šalamounova testamentu“. Je starý zhruba 160 let a jeho výskyt se omezuje na 2. polovinu 19. století v islandském Akureyri. V lidové islandské tradici nemáme žádné jiné stopy nežli tří rukopisů, které ze sebe navzájem vycházejí. V žádném případě se nejedná o symbol používaný v době vikinské a kvůli rozdílu osmi set let by s tímto obdobím neměl být spojovaný. Islandský „vegvísir“ má čtvercový tvar, zatímco jeho kruhové varianty vznikly až ve 20. století. Současná popularita souvisí s rozvojem internetu a silné propagaci v online médiu, které je snadno dostupné současným uživatelům tohoto symbolu.

Poděkování si zaslouží přátelé, kteří mne inspirovali k sepsání, stejně jako lidé, kteří významným způsobem pomohly radou. Tímto děkuji Václavu Maňhovi za prvotní nápad, Marianne Guckelsberger za korekce islandského textu a Renému Diekenovi za upozornění na anglické prameny.


Literatura

Davíðsson, Ólafur (1903). Isländische Zauberzeichen und Zauberbücher. In: Zeitschrift des Vereins für Volkskunde 13, s. 150-167, 267-279, pls. III-VIII.

Eggertson, Jochum M. (1940). Galdraskræða Skugga, Reykjavík : Jólagjöfin.

Eggertsson, Jochum M. (2015). Sorcerer’s Screed : The Icelandic Book of Magic Spells, Reykjavík : Lesstofan.

Flowers, Stephen (1989). The Galdrabók: An Icelandic Grimoire, York Beach, Me. : S. Weiser.

Foster, Justin (2013 – 2015). Vegvísir (Path Guide). In: Galdrastafir: Icelandic Magical Staves. Dostupné z: http://users.on.net/~starbase/galdrastafir/vegvisir.htm

Foster, Justin (2015). The Huld Manuscript – ÍB 383 4to : A modern transcription, decryption and translation. Dostupné z: https://www.academia.edu/13008560/Huld_Manuscript_of_Galdrastafir_Witchcraft_Magic_Symbols_and_Runes_-_English_Translation